Campus Address: 494 Lucas Hall
Web Site: http://www.umsl.edu/~genderstudies/
Main Number: 314-516-5265

The Gender Studies Program has three central missions: to provide a comprehensive undergraduate and graduate gender studies curriculum, to support research on gender issues, to sponsor events and provide community outreach. Faculty engage in disciplinary and interdisciplinary scholarship to enhance our understanding of the ways in which gender, sex and sexuality, notions of race, and socioeconomic class have structured human society and experience across time and cultures. Faculty and students draw upon the rich body of interdisciplinary scholarship to investigate emerging theories and research on gender as well as constructions of femininity and masculinity. Our courses encourage a reassessment of gender roles in society and facilitate students' career goals. Gender Studies classes promote the exchange of knowledge among people of different races, genders, classes, ethnicities, sexualities and cultural conditions. Gender Studies courses enable students to broaden their educational experiences and develop new insights into their own lives and aspirations.

The Gender Studies Major

Undergraduate students may design their own major through the Bachelor’s in Interdisciplinary Studies. The Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (BIS) provides a flexible, individualized program of study for the self-directed learner. It is intended for students who have unique educational goals that cannot be met by any other UMSL degree program. Each degree program is developed by the student, with advising by faculty and a professional Student Services Coordinator. It is open to all students, including those enrolled in the Pierre Laclede Honors College. The BIS degree enables a student to combine courses from at least three different disciplines, taken at the intermediate or advanced level. This allows students to study a subject from multiple academic perspectives (for example, Gender Studies, including History, English, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Sociology, and/or Social Work), or to combine courses for a specific career goal (for example, leadership or non-profit management). Student may also receive credit for professional internships, research internships, or community service, under the supervision of a UMSL faculty member. Some BIS degree programs may be completed entirely with evening courses.

The BIS requires the student to define a personalized Area of Study of at least 36 credit hours, no more than 15 hours of which can be in one department. All courses in the Area of Study must be at the 2000-level or above, and 18 credits must be earned at UM-St. Louis after the student is admitted to the BIS program. Up to six hours may be taken as faculty-supervised professional internship, research internship, or community service, which must be approved by the faculty member in advance. In order to be admitted to the BIS, students must also have a campus grade point average of 2.0 or above. Please contact Dr. Kathleen Nigro, Gender Studies Advisor, at nigrok@umsl.edu for more information.

Gender Studies Minor

For a Minor in Gender Studies, students must take at least 12 hours of Gender Studies courses. 9 hours must include 3 core courses:

  1. GS 2102 Introduction to Gender Studies
  2. GS 3033 Sexuality and Gender Theory or other 3000-5000 level course in feminist or gender theory.
  3. Capstone experience: Students must complete a final research project or practicum. The Capstone requirement may be satisfied by GS 4352 Independent Study in Gender Studies, GS 4353 Internship in Gender Studies, or by a 4000-level Gender Studies course or other 4000-level seminar where student completes a final research and writing project that focuses on gender studies.

The remaining 3 hours may be cross-listed courses with the student’s major department or Gender Studies electives from various disciplines.

Undergraduate Certificates

Gender Studies Certificate

Requirements For Admission

Undergraduate certificate candidates must meet the University’s general education requirements. Applicants must have a cumulative G.P.A. of at least 2.5 and must maintain a minimum 2.5 G.P.A. in Gender Studies courses. Candidates for undergraduate certificates are asked to register with Gender Studies after taking one or two courses. Students will then be enrolled in the program and will be placed on our mailing list for class information and announcements of upcoming events.

Certificate Requirements

Students must take at least 18 hours in Gender Studies courses. 9 hours must include 3 core courses:

  1. GS 2102 Introduction to Gender Studies
  2. GS 3033 Sexuality and Gender Theory or other 3000-5000 level course in feminist or gender theory
  3. Capstone Experience: Students must complete a final research project or practicum. The Capstone requirement may be satisfied by GS 4352 Independent Study in Gender Studies, GS 4353 Internship in Gender Studies, or by a 4000-level Gender Studies course or other 4000-level seminar where student completes a final research and writing project that focuses on gender studies.

9 hours may be cross-listed courses with student’s major department or Gender Studies electives from various disciplines.

Gender Studies Certificate in Women’s Leadership

For the Gender Studies Certificate in Women’s Leadership, students must take at least 18 hours of Gender Studies courses. 6 hours must include 2 core components:

  1. GS 2102 Introduction to Gender Studies
  2. Capstone Experience: The capstone requirement may be satisfied by GS 4352 , Independent Study in Gender Studies, or GS 4353 , Internship in Gender Studies (which includes the Sue Shear Institute for Women in Public Life, the Women’s University Mentoring Program, the Women’s Executive Leadership Institute, or a comparable program approved by the GS director).

The remaining 12 hours may be selected from the following choices; take no more than two courses per curricular designation.

COMM 3337Male/Female Communication3
COMM 2232Effective Communication In The Organization: Tools For Leadership3
GS 2150Special Topics In Gender Studies3
MGMT/SOC 3600Management And Organizational Behavior3
MGMT 3611Advanced Management And Organizational Behavior3
MGMT 3623/PSYCH 3318Industrial And Organizational Psychology3
MGMT 3625Leadership in Organization3
MKTG 3785Women in International Entrepreneurship 13
PHIL/GS 2253Philosophy And Feminism3
POL SCI 2380The Politics of Gender in the United States3
POL SCI 3590Women and Leadership World-Wide: Breaking the Glass Ceiling3
PSYCH 2230Psychology Of Gender3
PSYCH 3316/MGMT 3623Fundamentals Of Leadership3
SOC/MGMT 3600Management and Organizational Behavior3
1

 Prerequisites: MKTG 3700 (Basic Marketing) and MKTG 3780 (International Marketing)

Gender and the Military Undergraduate Certificate

Core Courses
GS 2102Introduction To Gender Studies3
GS 2130Gender and the Military3
Electives9
Choose three of the following courses:
Sex And Gender Across Cultures
Male/Female Communication
Gender, Crime, And Justice
Violence Against Women
Work, Families, And Public Policy
Topics In Writing (Life Writing)
Veterans in America
Current Issues in Military and Veterans Studies
Sexual Ethics
Gender And The Law
The Politics of Gender in the United States
Psychology Of Gender
Psychology Of Trauma
Cross-Cultural Psychology
Families in Global Perspective
Masculinities
Gender Issues in Social Work
Capstone Requirement
GS 4352Independent Study In Gender Studies3
or GS 4353 Internship In Gender Studies
or MVS 4200 Independent Study in Military and Veterans Issues
Total Hours18

Graduate Certificate

The graduate certificate in Gender Studies is designed for students who wish to receive post-baccalaureate training in gender studies.

For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this graduate certificate program, and other important information, please visit our Gainful Employment Disclosure website: http://umsl.edu/go/BoV.

Requirements For Admission

  • Baccalaureate degree 2.75 G.P.A.
  • Official transcripts of all previous undergraduate/graduate work
  • Two letters of recommendation

If you are not currently enrolled at UMSL, you must apply through the Graduate School. This certificate is available to students with Bachelor’s or Master’s degrees and students enrolled in graduate degree programs. A student need not be enrolled in a degree program to earn the Gender Studies graduate certificate. Post B.A./B.S. students may enroll in the undergraduate or graduate certificate program.

Certificate Requirements

At least 18 hours of Gender Studies courses at the 4000, 5000, and/or 6000 level

  1. 3 hours must include a graduate feminist or gender theory course, which may be GS 5033 , Advanced Sexuality and Gender Theory, GS 5040  Feminist Critical Theory, or other theory course.
  2. 3 hours must include either a graduate internship or practicum, or final writing project, which may be an independent study GS 6452 Special Readings in Gender Studies, or a substantial research and writing project for a GS graduate seminar, which may be GS 6450 Seminar in Gender Studies, or other cross-listed, 5000 or 6000-level seminar
  3. 12 hours must be at the 5000 level or above, while up to 6 hours of 4000-level courses may be taken for graduate credit, as long as student completes graduate level work for the course.
  4. No more than 6 hours may be taken as Directed or Independent Study credit.

Most Gender Studies courses are cross-listed with other departments and count toward a department’s degree requirements we well as toward the certificate.

Courses

GS 2020 History of Women and Social Movements: 3 semester hours

Same as HIST 2020. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. This course explores the history of women and social movements in the nineteenth and twentieth century United States. It considers social and political movements such as abolitionism, women's suffrage, progressivism, the labor movement, the civil rights movement, and second wave feminism.

GS 2066 Women and Gender in African History: 3 semester hours

Same as HIST 2066. This course will explore the history of Africa, highlighting African women’s lives, experiences, and agency, and questioning the application of Western concepts of gender to an African setting.

GS 2100 Women in Contemporary Society: 3 semester hours

.

GS 2102 Introduction to Gender Studies: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC WK 2102, HIST 2102, POL SCI 2102, and SOC 2102. This core class is required for all Gender Studies Certificate earners. This class introduces students to cultural, political and historical issues that shape gender. Through a variety of disciplinary perspectives in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, the course familiarizes students with diverse female and male experiences and gendered power relationships.

GS 2130 Gender and the Military: 3 semester hours

Same as MVS 2130. This course examines the treatment of gender difference in the military and focuses on the complex intersection between military culture and social constructs of gender in the civilian world.

GS 2150 Special Topics In Gender Studies: 3 semester hours

An introduction to a particular topic area in women's and gender studies (topics will be announced prior to registration) drawing on the theories and methods of such disciplines as sociology, psychology, political science, history, philosophy, art history, and others to examine particular aspects of gender in social and cultural life. Course may satisfy the distribution requirement for humanities or social sciences depending on the topic.

GS 2224 Marriage and the Family: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC 2224. The study of patterns of close relationships, and how these relationships are influenced by larger social forces. Topics include love, dating, mate selection, cohabitation, alternative lifestyles, working families, parenting, single mothers, families in crisis, domestic violence, and divorce. Universal and variable aspects of family organization, family role systems, and changes in family social structure are considered.

GS 2230 Psychology Of Gender: 3 semester hours

Same as PSYCH 2230. Prerequisites: PSYCH 1003. Evaluation of psychological theories and research regarding physiological, cognitive, and personality gender differences and similarities, gender related problems in adjustment, and gender specific clinical interventions.

GS 2232 Psychology of Trauma: 3 semester hours

Same as PSYCH 2232. Prerequisites: PSYCH 1003. This course is designed to review the psychological effects of crime, violence, war, natural disasters, and other traumas. Particular attention is paid to the development of specific psychopathology and other negative consequences of traumatic events. The process of recovery from distress following psychological events is further emphasized. The role of gender and its relationship to victimization and the development of psychopathology and recovery are considered throughout the course.

GS 2253 Philosophy And Feminism: 3 semester hours

Same as PHIL 2253. A critical examination of what various philosophers have said about issues of concern to women. Sample topics include oppression, racism, women's nature, femininity, marriage, motherhood, sexuality, pornography, the ethics of care.

GS 2290 Gender and the Law: 3 semester hours

Same as POL SCI 2290. This course examines the ways in which laws and interpretations of laws affect gender equality in the United States. Emphasizing how traditional roles impact both women and men historically and currently, the course highlights major pieces of legislation and court rulings related to employment, economics, education, sexual harassment, pornography, rape, reproductive rights, and domestic relations. The course stresses the impact of federal and state institutions and non-governmental influences on equality. It also addresses gender representation in the legal profession admits effect on judicial decisions. This course satisfies State requirements in American History and Government.

GS 2380 Politics of Gender in the United States: 3 semester hours

Same as POL SCI 2380. Prerequisites: POL SCI 1100 or consent of instructor. This course examines the role of gender in political institutions, practices and policy in the United States, past and present. It focuses on various movements for political equality, the relationship between gender and political participation, vote choice, and public opinion, and how legislative, executive, and judicial offices are gendered at the national, state, and local levels.

GS 2410 Work, Families, and Public Policy: 3 semester hours

Same as ECON 2410. Prerequisites: ECON 1000 or ECON 1001. This course compares the economic behavior of women and men in both the labor market and the household. Topics include: the family as an economic (production) unit, gender differences in labor force participation, occupations and earnings; the effectiveness of human capital theory and labor market discrimination in explaining the male-female wage gap; remedies for reducing the wage gap; family structure and economic well-being; and alternative policies to alleviate poverty. Students who have completed ECON 3400 may not take 2410 for credit.

GS 3031 History Of Women In The United States: 3 semester hours

Same as HIST 3031. Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of the instructor. Development of women's economic, political, and social role in the United States with special emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; women and work; women and the family; women and reform movements; women and education; feminist theories and activists; images of women.

GS 3224 Families in Global Perspective: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC 3224. Prerequisites: SOC 1010 or consent of instructor. This course presents research from the fields of demography, sociology, economics, and public policy in order to develop a broader understanding of the causes and consequences of population aging, one of the major demographic changes faced by social institutions worldwide. Attention to the global diversity of human experiences by age, gender, socioeconomic status.

GS 3250 Sociology Of Victimization: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC 3250. Prerequisite: SOC 1010. This course examines the role of social factors in a wide range of kinds of victimization--crime, violence, natural disasters, accidents, disease, etc. The topic of social reactions to various kinds of victimization is also covered. Sociological theories of victimization are emphasized.

GS 3350 Special Topics in Gender Studies: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: GS 2102 or consent of instructor Special topics in women's and Gender Studies. Topics vary by semester.

GS 3352 Independent Studies In Gender Studies: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing; two courses in Women's and Gender Studies, including GS 2102; and consent of the instructor and the Institute. Directed independent work in selected women's and gender studies topics through readings, research, reports and/or conferences. Course may satisfy the distribution requirement for the humanities, social sciences, or math/science depending on topic.

GS 3376 Gender In The Visual Arts: 3 semester hours

Same as ART HS 3376. Prerequisites: Minimum of one 2000-level course in ART HIST and ENGL 3100, or consent of instructor. Selected topics in the role of gender difference in the production and reception of works of visual art and culture. This course will consider examples of historical and contemporary works through gender theories and the analysis of cultural and social factors that contribute to the construction of sexualities and genders.

GS 3590 Women and Leadership World-Wide: Breaking the Glass Ceiling: 3 semester hours

Same as POL SCI 3590. Prerequisites: POL SCI 1500 or consent of instructor. Compares women's day-to-day leadership and participation patterns across a wide variety of political-economic contexts, emphasizing their performance as elective and executive office holders. It examines the experiences of individual female leaders, the effect of country- specific nomination and recruitment strategies, party dynamics, and the larger political opportunity structure hindering or promoting the balanced participation of women and men in national leadership. Understanding how gender (the socially constructed meanings related to biological sex) operates within these specific contexts is a major concern.

GS 3700 Diversity And Social Justice: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC WK 3700. Prerequisites: PSYCH 2160 or SOC 2160; and SOC WK 3100 taken prior or concurrently. Analyzes the structure, dynamics, and consequences of social and economic injustice, and the impact on diverse groups in American society. Examines theoretical models and practice principles for work with diverse groups.

GS 4100 Introduction to Feminist and Gender Theory: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC 4100. Prerequisites: GS 2102. This class serves as an initial intellectual investigation into gendered ideologies (such as the effects of race, ethnicity, nationality, socioeconomic class, sexuality, and religion) and functions as a bridge to later advanced gender theory and methods courses. Topics include interdisciplinary feminist theories (with a focus on gender equality), including masculinity theory, queer theory, muted group theory, and other evolving frameworks.

GS 4320 Gender, Sexuality & Aging: 3 semester hours

Same as GERON 4320. Prerequisites: Junior/senior undergraduate or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor or program director. This course examines advancing age through a gender lens. Men and women experience aging differently based on a host of genetic, biological, psychological, sociocultural and personal identity factors. This course challenges students to consider aging from various perspectives, including cultural expectations and norms, couple and family relationships, health and function, work life and retirement, sexuality, sexual orientation, gender identity, concerns of LGBT elders, and veterans' issues.

GS 4325 Gender, Crime And Justice: 3 semester hours

Same as CRIMIN 4325 and SOC 4325. Prerequisites: CRIMIN 1110, CRIMIN 1120, CRIMIN 2130, CRIMIN 2210, CRIMIN 2220, ENGL 3100 or consent of instructor. Analysis of the role of gender in crime and in the justice system. Emphasis on gender differences in crime commission, criminal processing, and the employment of women in criminal justice agencies. Fulfills criminology diversity requirement.

GS 4330 Violence Against Women: 3 semester hours

Same as CRIMIN 4330. Prerequisites: Junior Standing, CRIMIN 1110, CRIMIN 1120, CRIMIN 2130, CRIMIN 2210, CRIMIN 2220, and ENGL 3100, or consent of instructor. This course examines the nature, extent, causes and consequences of various types of violence against women, including rape, sexual assault, stalking, and intimate partner violence. Criminal justice policy and practice regarding violence against women are also examined.

GS 4335 Gender and Body Image in Media and Culture: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: GS 2102, GS 4100, and six additional hours of GS courses. Through the lens of feminist and gender theory, this course engages students in conversations pertaining to gender, media, body image, and culture. Students will read and analyze fiction and non-fiction texts in order to realize the multidisciplinarity of gender and body image as themes and motifs. Students are required to participate in Service-Learning in order to deepen their understanding of how these issues affect day-to-day lives within their communities.

GS 4350 Special Topics in Gender Studies: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: GS 2102 or consent of instructor. Special topics examined from a gender perspective in the fields of anthropology, art history, criminology, economics, English, foreign language, history, philosophy, political science, psychology, social work, sociology, business, or others. Topics and departments vary by semester. Course may be repeated by permission of Director of the Center.

GS 4352 Independent Study In Gender Studies: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: GS 2102 or consent of instructor. Independent, directed readings and research in a women's gender related topic, to be determined in consultation with instructor.

GS 4353 Internship In Gender Studies: 3 semester hours

.

GS 4360 Sociology Of Minority Groups: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC 4360. Prerequisites: SOC 1010 and junior standing or consent of instructor. The study of dominant-subordinate group relations. Religion, ethnicity, race, and gender as factors in the unequal distribution of power.

GS 4452 Feminism And Science: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 4452. Prerequisites: Six hours of philosophy, graduate standing, or consent of instructor. This course will explore major themes and issues in feminist science scholarship, a body of research that focuses on the relationship between science and gender. Feminist research in the philosophy and history of science, and in the biological sciences, are emphasized. Issues include: the nature of objectivity, evidence, and truth; the factors that contribute to the acceptance or rejection of research hypothesis and theories; the nature and consequences of science's cognitive authority; and the relationship between science and values.

GS 4520 The Aging Body: 3 semester hours

Same as GERON 4520. Prerequisites: Geron or Soc 2170 or 2000 level or higher Geron, Soc, Psych, Soc Wk, or Nurse course or consent of instructor. This course focuses on the aging body with respect to health and function. Physiologic and cognitive concerns of older men and women are reviewed. Contextual factors (e.g., relationships, socio-cultural, spiritual, environmental) and issues in service delivery are also addressed.

GS 4600 Masculinities: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC 4600. Prerequisites: GS 2102 or consent of instructor. This course examines men and masculinities through a critical lens, looking carefully at an institutionalized system of gender relations and practices that is assumed to be a natural phenomenon that is culturally universal. The course explores various masculine behaviors, myths, ideologies, and experiences so that students can consider the relationship between masculine practice and social power and delineate choices for future directions. The course is necessarily interdisciplinary and may utilize tools and methods from the social sciences and the humanities. Satisfies GS gender theory requirement.

GS 4610 Intimate Partner Violence: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC WK 4610. Prerequisites: SOC WK 3510. Focuses on theoretical and empirical understanding of domestic violence in US society and social work practice with battered women and their families. Addresses direct services, community organizing, and public policy changes to help end violence against women. Relationships between violence against women and other forms of oppression (e.g., racism, economic exploitation, heterosexism and social class) are explored.

GS 4630 Gender and Social Issues: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC WK 4630. Prerequisites: SOC WK 3700, GS 2102 or graduate standing. This course will help students become more sensitive to social and welfare concerns based on gender. Topics may include work, education, family responsibilities, violence against women, and special health and mental health service needs. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how social action can be used to bring about positive change.

GS 4920 Gender, Power, and the Environment: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: GS 2102, or consent of instructor. This course will examine how gendered observations about nature create, support, and/or dispute particular cultural and social attitudes toward the environment. Students will consider debates in feminist pedagogy, ecofeminism, and social constructivism about the relationship of gender to nature.

GS 4925 Feminism and Witchcraft: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: GS 2102, or consent of instructor. This class will examine literary and historical treatments of witchcraft through a cross-cultural, feminist theoretical framework. Students will read primary historical documents as well as fictional, dramatic, and poetic representations of witches and witchcraft. The course will consider changing perspectives toward witches in contemporary gender theory, spiritualist discourse and popular media.

GS 4930 Studies In Gender And Literature: 3 semester hours

Same as ENGL 4930. Prerequisites: Students must satisfy English prerequisites for 4000-level courses or obtain permission of instructor. The course examines the role of gender in literature, including the transformation of literary genres by women writers, writings by women during a particular historical period, and gender relations in literature. Specific topics vary from semester to semester. The course may be repeated for credit with departmental approval.

GS 4931 English Women Writers, 1300-1750: 3 semester hours

Same as ENGL 4931. Prerequisites: Students must satisfy English prerequisites for 4000-level courses or obtain permission of instructor. Works will be read ranging in scope from closet drama and romance to lyrics to personal, political, and religious writing by women, such as Margery Kempe, Mary Sidney, and Amelia Lanyer who wrote during a period when reading and writing were not the female norm.

GS 4932 Female Gothic: 3 semester hours

Same as ENGL 4932. Prerequisites: Students must satisfy English prerequisites for 4000-level courses or obtain permission of instructor. The course examines the historical development of the female gothic, a genre which employs narrative strategies for expressing fears and desires associated with female experience. From the late 18th century to the present, we will trace the persistence of the Gothic vision in fiction and film.

GS 4933 Female Novel Of Development: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Students must satisfy English prerequisites for 4000-level courses or obtain permission of instructor. The course covers the development of the female Bildungsroman from the late 18th century to the present. We will consider how temporary and current theories of female development help us read these novels within their particular cultural contexts.

GS 4934 Austen And The Brontes: 3 semester hours

Same as ENGL 4934. Prerequisites: Students must satisfy English prerequisites for 4000-level courses or obtain permission of instructor. This course covers the novels of the major 19th century British writers Jane Austen and the three Bronte sisters, Anne, Emily, and Charlotte. The course will be devoted to Austen's romantic comedies and the historical/cultural contexts that inform the novels, as well as the darker romanticism of the Brontes, along with the biographical, cultural, philosophical, and religious contexts of their work.

GS 5320 Gender and Aging: 3 semester hours

Same as: GERON 5320. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. This course examines advancing age through a gender lens. Men and women experience aging differently based on a host of genetic, biological, psychological, sociocultural and personal identity factors. This course challenges students to consider aging from various perspectives, including cultural expectations and norms, couple and family relationships, health and function, work life and retirement, sexual orientation, gender identity, concerns of LGBT elders, and veteran’s issues.

GS 5350 Topics In Women's And Gender Studies: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and at least one Women's and Gender Studies course. This course will focus on a particular aspect of gender (to be announced prior to registration) and will draw upon recent theoretical and methodological work from a variety of disciplines.

GS 5450 Special Topics In Gender Studies: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Special topics at the Graduate level examined from a gender perspective in the field of anthropology, art history, criminology, economics, English, foreign language, history philosophy, political science, psychology, social work, sociology, business, or others. Topics and departments vary by semester.

GS 5500 Foundations Of Human Behavior In The Social Environment: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC WK 5500. Prerequisites: SOC WK 3150 or equivalent or admission to the MSW program. Focuses on theoretical and empirical understanding of human behavior in the social environment using a life-span perspective Introduces biological, behavioral, cognitive, and sociocultural theories of individuals, families, and small groups, and their implications for the professional social worker's understanding of socioeconomic status, gender, disability, ethnicity, race, and sexual orientation.

GS 5635 Social Work Practice With Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Populations: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC WK 5635. Prerequisites: SOC WK 5100 and SOC WK 5500. This advanced practice course focuses on developing the theoretical and empirical knowledge and practice skills necessary for effective social work practice with lesbian, gay male, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons and their families. This course aims to explore deeper understanding of LGBT identities, families, health and mental health challenges, and issues of political advocacy.

GS 5700 Diversity, Social Justice And Social Practice: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC WK 5700. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Analyzes the structure, dynamics, and consequences of social and economic injustice, and the impact on diverse groups in American society. Examines theoretical models and practice principles for work with diverse groups.

GS 5940 Seminar In Gender And Literature: 3 semester hours

Same as ENGL 5940. Gender studies in literature of different periods, types, and genres; satisfies area requirement (1-6) appropriate to its period, national literature, and genre.

GS 6350 Gender, Language and Identity: 3 semester hours

Same as TCH ED 6350. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. An interdisciplinary look at the ways gendered and racial identities get developed and shaped through language and culture. Readings will address the complex, yet sometimes invisible, ways that identity, language and gender intersect, creating and assigning roles, responsibilities, and possible selves to individuals and groups in a global world.

GS 6353 Graduate Internship In Gender Studies: 1-6 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of director. Provides an opportunity for the Graduate Women's and Gender Studies student to acquire "real world" experience working in a non-profit, political, economic, or social service organization with a gender focus.

GS 6410 Gender, Sexuality, and Mental Health: 3 semester hours

Same as PSYCH 6410. Prerequisites: Admission to the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology or consent of the instructor. This course will focus on contemporary theory and research on gender and sexuality as they pertain to mental health issues. Gender differences and similarities in the presentation, etiology, and treatment of sexual health problems and other mental illnesses will be discussed.

GS 6450 Seminar In Gender Studies: 3 semester hours

.

GS 6452 Special Readings In Gender Studies: 3 semester hours

.

Kathleen Butterly Nigro
Director and Associate Teaching Professor
Ph.D., Saint Louis University
Sociology, Gerontology, and Gender

Lynn M. Staley
Assistant Director and Advisor
Ph.D., Saint Louis University
English

Elizabeth Eckelkamp
Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and Teaching Professor of Japanese
M.A., Washington University

Alan Heisel
Professor of Communications
Ed.D., West Virginia University

Vicki Sauter
Professor of Business Administration
Ph.D., Northwestern University

Therese Macan
Professor of Psychology
Ph.D., Rice University

Brenda Bredemeier
Associate Professor of Education
Ph.D., Temple University

Angela Coker
Associate Professor of Education
Ph.D., Union Institute University

Sarah Lacy
Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Ph.D., Washington University

Suellynn Duffey
Associate Professor of English
Ph.D., Ohio State University

Lauren Obermark
Assistant Professor of English
Ph.D., Ohio State University

Thomas Meuser
Associate Professor of Gerontology and Director of Graduate Gerontology Program
Ph.D., University of Missouri-St. Louis

Deborah Cohen
Associate Professor of History
Ph.D., University of Chicago

Laura Westhoff
Associate Professor of History and Education
Ph.D., Washington University

Zoe Peterson
Associate Professor of Psychology
Ph.D., University of Kansas

Bettina Casad
Assistant Professor of Psychology
Ph.D., Claremont Graduate University

Jacqueline Thompson
Assistant Professor of Theater
M.F.A., University of Louisville

James Craig
Associate Teaching Professor, Military & Veterans Studies
M.P.A., Harvard University

Lori Curtis
Associate Teaching Professor of Social Work
M.S.W., Washington University

Courtney McDermott
Associate Teaching Professor of Social Work
M.S.W., St. Louis University

Anita Manion
Associate Teaching Professor
Ph.D., Saint Louis University
Political Science

Maria Balogh
Associate Teaching Professor of Spanish
M.A., Southern Illinois University - Carbondale
M.F.A., University of Missouri St. Louis

Jill Delston
Assistant Teaching Professor of Philosophy
Ph.D., Washington University

Kimberly Baldus
Associate Teaching Professor Pierre Laclede Honors College
Ph.D., Northwestern University

Patricia Rosenthal
Clinical Professor of Social Work
M.S.W., Washington University

Jerry Dunn
Clinical Associate Professor of Psychology and Director of Children's Advocacy Center
Ph.D., University of Missouri-St. Louis

Deana L. Smith
Clinical Associate Professor of Psychology and Associate Director of CPS
Ph.D., University of Missouri-St. Louis

Malaika Horne
Director of Executive Leadership Consortium
Ph.D., St. Louis University

Vivian Eveloff
Director

Lynn Voss
Assistant Director
MA, CPP
Sue Shear Institute

Sally Ebest
Professor Emerita

Carol Peck
Professor Emerita
Ph.D., University of California-Los Angeles
Optometry

Jayne Stake
Professor Emerita
Ph.D., Arizona State University
Psychology

Nanora Sweet
Professor Emerita
Ph.D., University of Michigan
English

Zuleyma Tang Martinez
Professor Emerita
Ph.D., Biology

Kathy Gentile
Associate Professor Emerita
Ph.D., University of Oregon
English

Virginia Navarro
Associate Professor Emerita
Ph.D., Washington University