Campus Address: 574 Clark Hall
Web Site: http://www.umsl.edu/gerontology/
Main Number: 314-516-5421
Fax Number: 314-516-7235

Overview

Gerontology is the study of aging from perspectives of the individual, family, community and collective bodies (e.g., governments). Gerontologists understand key social, psychological, biological, medical and functional aspects of the aging process, and they apply this knowledge in various professional settings from direct service to public policy. The Gerontology Program - part of the Department of Sociology, Gerontology & Gender (SGG) -  welcomes students interested in the rich lived experiences of older adults in the US and across the globe. We offer flexible plans of study toward specialized careers in aging, as well as opportunities for personal learning and enrichment.

The Gerontology Program is unique in our applied practice emphasis and inter-professional focus in the classroom. Our goal is to train “generalist gerontologists” with competencies in theory, research and evidence-based practice. Our Master of Science in Gerontology (MSG) degree is our flagship offering and a “must have” credential for higher level professional work in this growing field. Our Graduate Certificate in Gerontology (GCG) is often paired with another graduate degree to add an aging specialization (e.g., MSW + GCG for a Gerontological Social Worker). Our Undergraduate Certificate in Gerontological Studies (UCGS) is designed to support entry level employment in a variety of aging service settings. Finally , our Minor in Gerontology provides many learning options for those interested in forming a general competence.

We are an evening program, primarily, for live instruction and our footprint of online offerings continues to grow. The Minor in Gerontology can be completed 100% online and makes a great add-on for just about any Major at UMSL. We emphasize teamwork and cross-disciplinary practice in our courses, and train students in critical skills (communication, interviewing, screening for common problems in aging, intervention, referral) to be successful practitioners and change agents. Community-based practicum experiences build professional competence and connections for later employment.

Degree Options

  • Master of Science in Gerontology (36 credit hours; minimum 4 consecutive semesters full-time)
  • Graduate Certificate in Gerontology (18; 2)
  • Undergraduate Certificate in Gerontological Studies (18; 2)
  • Minor in Gerontology (15; 2)

Career Outlook

Americans are living longer and maintaining high quality of life and productive engagement are top priorities for most aging adults today. The post WW2 "baby boom" population are now moving into older age and bringing new perspectives and vigor on what it means to be old. The career outlook for gerontology is strong and will continue to be for decades to come.

All of our degree options have applicability to entry level and up to higher level positions. Our graduates work in various direct service, program coordination, administrative, public policy, analytic and education roles with respect to aging. Well trained professionals are always needed in social services and community development. Many local governments now employ Gerontologists to address the needs of their senior residents. This is also true for corporations and banks who serve and target those in the aging marketplace.

The long-term care industry is growing rapidly, and gerontologists find good paying positions in marketing, social services for residents, health promotion, and administration (among other roles). We are lucky in the greater St. Louis area to have a strong infrastructure for aging services: government, not-for-profit, and for-profit. Geriatric Care Management is a growing field and well-suited to the skills of our graduates. Hospice is another popular career area. As time goes on, new opportunities in technology, media and product development will emerge. This is already happening, in fact, and many social and business entrepreneurs are interested in the aging marketplace.

Faculty Overview

Gerontology is a multi-disciplinary field of study and professional practice. No single professional can cover all aspects of aging, so teamwork and coordination are keys to success in this field. Gerontologists are trained to see the "big picture"  for aging adults and navigate the system to address their unique needs and highlight their many current and potential contributions. Our regular and adjunct faculty have backgrounds in psychology, social work, optometry, health economics, sociology, hospice, anthropology, nursing, geriatric care management, business, and other relevant fields and professional disciplines. Many are known nationally for their work in such areas as driving safety and aging, reminiscence and life review, caregiver health and well-being, Alzheimer's disease, productive engagement, medical anthropology, etc. Students learn from the best, and that makes a difference in their education and professional prospects afterwards.

Minor in Gerontology

Students have many courses to choose from to create a personalized plan of study. All students must take a 3-credit introductory course – Aging in America: Concepts & Controversies (GERON 2170). At least 6 of the remaining 12 credits must be from courses at the 4000 level (see below).  Students wishing to designate a course for capstone for the BLS must coordinate this with Program Director for Gerontology prior to starting the course.

Required Course
GERON 2170Aging in America: Concepts & Controversies3
Electives
Choose Four Courses (with at least 6 credits at 4000 level):12
Human Growth And Development
Special Topics In Gerontology
Bioethics
Medicine, Values, And Society
Social & Community Services for an Aging Population
GERON/PSYCH 2280
Medical Anthropology
Aging, Culture & Globalization
Families in Global Perspective
Interviewing Older Adults And Life Review
Gerontological Practice with Aging Veterans
Gender, Sexuality & Aging
Human Learning And Memory
Social Gerontology
Mental Health And Aging
Aging, Chronic Illness & Disability
Directed Readings
Physiology & Pharmacology of Aging
Dying, Grief & Death in Older Adulthood
Successful Aging: Individual & Societal Perspectives
Ageless Arts: Creativity in Later Life
Introduction to Gerontological Practice
Total Hours15

Undergraduate Certificate in Gerontological Studies

Opportunities and challenges of human aging intersect with most academic and professional disciplines. Older adults receive a range of health, social, economic and other support services (e.g. through government programs, medical centers, senior centers, long-term care facilities, not-for-profit agencies) in order to age successfully at home or elsewhere.

The proportion of older adults in the US population will grow substantially in coming decades. The 18 credit hour Undergraduate Certificate in Gerontological Studies (UCGS) is designed to prepare students for entry level, service-oriented positions in this growing marketplace.

The UCGS adds a tangible credential for future work with and for older adults, and it can be pursued with any major area of study with proper planning.  Please contact the Director of the Gerontology Program to learn more and for an advising appointment.

Required
GERON 2170Aging in America: Concepts & Controversies3
GERON/SOC 2300Social & Community Services for an Aging Population3
Choose Four Courses:12
Medical Anthropology
Aging, Culture & Globalization
Interviewing Older Adults And Life Review
Gerontological Practice with Aging Veterans
Gender, Sexuality & Aging
Social Gerontology
Mental Health And Aging
Aging, Chronic Illness & Disability
Physiology & Pharmacology of Aging
Dying, Grief & Death in Older Adulthood
Introduction to Gerontological Practice
Successful Aging: Individual & Societal Perspectives
Ageless Arts: Creativity in Later Life
Total Hours18

Master of Science in Gerontology

The Master of Science degree in gerontology (MSG) is a multidisciplinary program of study and hands-on/service learning designed to prepare students for program management or direct service positions working with, and on behalf of, older adults and their family members. The program of study includes courses from a variety of departments including anthropology, nursing, psychology, sociology, social work, public policy administration, and optometry. Courses are offered primarily in the evening to accommodate part­-time as well as full­-time students.

Learning Outcomes

  • A detailed appreciation for the aging process with respect to successful aging, health status, physical functioning, cognition and capacity, psychosocial involvement, diversity, cultural influences and competence, and public policy;
  • An ability to integrate theoretical perspectives on aging with the practical needs and concerns of individuals in various living environments;
  • An ability to interpret and appropriately utilize research findings to inform daily practice, especially with respect to screening, assessment, intervention, and referral activities;
  • Professional competence in the areas of ethical practice, participation in multidisciplinary teams, communication with clients and families, assessment and intervention.

Admission Requirements

Program applicants must have the following:

  • Baccalaureate degree.
  • 3.0 or B average (students with exceptions should contact the director of the gerontology program).
  • Official transcripts of all previous undergraduate/graduate work.
  • Three letters of recommendation (from former instructors preferred; from professional associates acceptable).

In addition, students must meet the other general requirements for admission to the Graduate School as explained in the Graduate Study section of the Bulletin.

Admission Requirements

Program applicants must have the following:

  • Baccalaureate degree.
  • 3.0 or B average (students with exceptions should contact the director of the gerontology program).
  • Official transcripts of all previous undergraduate/graduate work.
  • Three letters of recommendation (from former instructors preferred; from professional associates acceptable).

In addition, students must meet the other general requirements for admission to the Graduate School as explained in the Graduate Study section of the Bulletin.

Degree Requirements

The students are required to complete 36 credit hours, including 30 hours in gerontology and related courses and 6 hours of statistics/research courses. The required core courses and elective options are listed below. Limited course substitutions may acceptable to meet degree requirements. Substitution decisions are made at the discretion of the Program Director. 

Gerontology Distribution Requirements

Core
GERON/ANTHRO 5440Sociocultural Aspects of Aging3
GERON 5376Psychopathology And Aging3
GERON 6441Aging And Health Behavior3
GERON/SOC WK/P P ADM/POL SCI 6444Seminar In Public Policy And Aging3
GERON/SOC WK 6450Gerontological Assessment3
Practica in Gerontology
GERON 6495Practicum In Gerontology3
Select one of the following:3
Advanced Practicum In Gerontology
Practicum in Geronotological Research
Research and Statistics
GERON 5420Research Methods and Analysis I3
GERON 5450Research Methods and Analysis II3
Electives9
Select three courses (9 credit hours) offered in Gerontology at the 4000 level or higher. Students should consult with the Program Director for approved courses.
Total Hours36

Program Administration Option

Students interested in emphasizing program administration qualifications as part of the MSG may request to apply their 9 elective credits towards earning a Certificate in Nonprofit Management & Leadership offered through Public Policy Administration. Students interested in this option must meet with the Certificate Director and request admission by the end of their second semester in the MSG Program. If admitted, the Director of Gerontology and the Certificate Director will work cooperatively to arrange a joint plan of study to meet objectives of both degrees within the 36 credits required for the MSG. Both practicum courses (GERON 6495 & GERON 6496) must emphasize program administration as part of this plan.

Graduate Certificate in Gerontology

The graduate certificate in gerontology is designed for students who wish to receive post-baccalaureate training in gerontology. The certificate can be taken by itself or in conjunction with pursuit of a graduate degree in another field. Eighteen credit hours are required.

For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this graduate certificate program, and other important information, please visit our Gainful Employment Disclosure website: http://umsl.edu/go/Bo3

Admission Requirements

Program applicants must have the following:

  • Baccalaureate degree.
  • 3.0 grade point average (students with exceptions should contact the director of the gerontology program).
  • Official transcripts of all previous undergraduate/ graduate work.
  • Two letters of recommendation.

Students already enrolled and in good standing in another masters or doctoral degree program at the University of Missouri – St. Louis should consult with the director of the gerontology program concerning streamlined admission options. Limited course substitutions may acceptable to meet degree requirements. Substitution decisions are made at the discretion of the Program Director. 

Core Curriculum
GERON 5376Psychopathology And Aging3
GERON/ANTHRO 5440Sociocultural Aspects of Aging3
GERON 6441/SOC WK 6443/P P ADM 6444/POL SCI 6444Aging And Health Behavior3
GERON 6444/SOC WK 6443/P P ADM 6444/POL SCI 6444Seminar In Public Policy And Aging3
GERON/SOC WK 6450Gerontological Assessment3
Practicum
GERON 6495Practicum In Gerontology3
Total Hours18

Courses

GERON 2003 Careers in Health and Medicine: 1 semester hour

Same as ANTHRO 2003, INTDSC 2003, SOC 2003. In this course, students will learn about occupations in such fields as medicine, the allied health professions, health non-profit organizations, and global healthcare delivery. Students will understand the education and skills necessary for various careers and for application to medical, professional, and graduate schools, and will become familiar with majors, certificates and minors that are available at UMSL. They will learn about employment opportunities in the healthcare industry in the St. Louis metropolitan area, and will be introduced to members of the local community who give guest lectures. Students will gain practical experience by shadowing a healthcare professional in their job.

GERON 2170 Aging in America: Concepts & Controversies: 3 semester hours

Same As SOC 2170. This course examines the major theoretical and service issues connected to the study of older adults and their families, using multidisciplinary perspectives. Students are provided with an introduction to the field of aging through an examination of current social issues and controversies. This course emphasizes student involvement through class discussion and applied activities, and is appropriate for students in the arts and sciences, business, communication, education, and nursing.

GERON 2220 Special Topics in Gerontology: 3 semester hours

Selected topics dealing with various aspects of gerontology. The specific contents of this course will vary from semester to semester. The course may be repeated with permission from the Gerontology director.

GERON 2256 Bioethics: 3 semester hours

Same as PHIL 2256. An examination of ethical issues in health care practice and clinical research and in public policies affecting health care. Topics include: abortion, euthanasia, health care, experimentation, informed consent and the right to health care.

GERON 2300 Social & Community Services for an Aging Population: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC 2300. This service-learning course is designed for students interested in working with and for the benefit of older adults in various settings. Students attend classes on campus and participate in defined volunteer placements with local agencies (e.g., St. Louis County Older Residents Program). The course introduces the range of social and community services available to seniors and their families today, while also exploring trends and technologies for the future. Public, for-profit and not-for-profit service models are examined, including common organizational, management, and staffing approaches. The important roles of volunteers-including peer to peer supports-are discussed. Attention is also given to how limited resources are allocated and the importance of program evaluation to ensure service quality and efficacy.

GERON 3212 Medical Anthropology: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 3212 and SOC 3212. Prerequisites: ANTHRO 1011 or GERON 2170 or PSYCH 1003 or SOC 1010 or consent of instructor or program director. An examination of the growing interaction between anthropology and medicine, and the increasing use of anthropologists in medical and health-care settings. In addition to teaching current theory in medical anthropology, the course focuses on anthropologically-based skills essential to those working in health-related fields.

GERON 3215 Aging, Culture & Globalization: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 3215 and SOC 3215. Prerequisites: ANTHRO 1011 or GERON 2170 or PSYCH 1003 or SOC 1010 or consent of instructor or program director. This course examines the wide-ranging variability in the roles of older people across different cultures and the effects these have on older people, their families, and their societies.

GERON 3280 Psychology of Death and Dying: 3 semester hours

Same as PSYCH 3280. Prerequisite: PSYCH 1003 or consent of the instructor. An exploration of end-of-life issues integrating the scholarly, social, and individual dimensions of death and dying. This course provides a solid grounding in theory and research, as well as practical application to students' lives.

GERON 4130 Interviewing Older Adults and Life Review: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC 4130. Prerequisites: Junior/senior undergraduate or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor or program director. This course combines training in interviewing techniques with video editing/production. Students will learn how to conduct life review interviews with older adults, and then take these skills into the community by interviewing older adults living in various settings. Students will learn how to use a digital video camera and edit video clips on the computer. Student-conducted interviews will be viewed by the instructor and classmates, issues associated with aging will be discussed, and constructive feedback provided. Some of the video clips developed in the course will become part of an educational video clip library.

GERON 4200 Gerontological Practice with Aging Veterans: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior/senior undergraduate or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor or program director. Aging veterans often demonstrate different social, health and psychological support needs. This practice-oriented course reviews and frames gerontological interventions for different veteran subpopulations, including those residing at home, in senior housing, and under Veterans Administration (VA) care. The impacts of age cohort, gender, service during war or peacetime, post-traumatic stress status, substance abuse and addiction, military culture, and pension and service-connected compensation are studied. Special opportunities and challenges for social service providers in the VA health system are also reviewed.

GERON 4320 Gender, Sexuality & Aging: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 4320. Prerequisites: Junior/senior undergraduate or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor or program director. This course examines advancing age through a gender lens. Men and women experience aging differently based on a host of genetic, biological, psychological, sociocultural and personal identity factors. This course challenges students to consider aging from various perspectives, including cultural expectations and norms, couple and family relationships, health and function, work life and retirement, sexuality, sexual orientation, gender identity, concerns of LGBT elders, and veterans' issues.

GERON 4361 Social Gerontology: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC 4361. Prerequisites: SOC 1010 and junior standing or consent of instructor. Topics include sociological theories of aging, technological and social change and its effects on the environment of older people, and prejudice and discrimination against the elderly.

GERON 4376 Mental Health and Aging: 3 semester hours

Same as PSYCH 4376 and SOC WK 4376. Prerequisites: 9 hours of psychology, graduate standing, or consent of instructor or program director. This course provides a survey of theory and research in mental health issues for older populations, focusing on psychological and social aspects of mental health and impairment. The course details approaches to understanding prevalence, etiology, assessment, and treatment of the psychological disorders most commonly experienced by older adults, including anxiety, depression, delirium, and dementia, among others.

GERON 4430 Ethnicity, Dementia and Caregiving: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC 4430. Prerequisites: Geron or Soc 2170 or 3000 level Geron, Soc, Psych or Anthro course or consent of instructor. An examination of the caregiving experience with respect to progressive dementia (e.g., Alzheimer's disease) and related socio-cultural influences. Special focus on the importance of cultural competence in the provision of health and social services to dementia patients and family caregivers from diverse national and ethnic backgrounds.

GERON 4445 Aging, Chronic Illness & Disability: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior/senior undergraduate or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor or program director. This course will examine the consequences of chronic illness and disability in aging for individual well-being, social roles, family dynamics, and the functioning of society. Chronic illness and disability are presented as medical concerns that have psychosocial and functional impacts for both individuals with these conditions and their caregivers. These impacts are shaped by the changing age structure of society. This course also reviews typologies of chronic illness and relevant state and federal policies intended to support both adults with chronic illness and disability and caregivers. Although the main focus of the course is on aging in the US, population aging is a worldwide phenomenon and global comparisons will be included.

GERON 4490 Directed Readings: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Directed reading and research or field work. May be repeated for a maximum of three hours.

GERON 4500 Physiology & Pharmacology of Aging: 3 semester hours

Same As PSYCH 4500. Prerequisites: Junior/senior undergraduate or graduate standing, or consent of the instructor or program director. This course examines functional health in advancing age and the impacts of common disease processes on the aging body. Symptom presentations, diagnostic considerations, treatment and management issues are discussed. A special emphasis is placed on pharmacology, especially how the aging body responds to different medication types, risks for drug-drug interactions, and challenges associated with polypharmacy. The course emphasizes a "whole person" approach to health and well-being, and targets the learning needs of those wishing to work with older adults in health, social and community service settings.

GERON 4520 The Aging Body: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 4520. Prerequisites: Geron or Soc 2170 or 2000 level or higher Geron, Soc, Psych, Soc Wk, or Nurse course or consent of instructor. This course focuses on the aging body with respect to health and function. Physiologic and cognitive concerns of older men and women are reviewed. Contextual factors (e.g., relationships, socio-cultural, spiritual, environmental) and issues in service delivery are also addressed.

GERON 4620 Dying, Grief & Death in Older Adulthood: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior/senior undergraduate or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor or program director. This course examines trajectories to death in older age, the dying process, influences of medical and aging-related conditions, euthanasia and suicide, life extension and longevity, personal beliefs and existential responses, how individuals and families cope, ethical concerns, and strategies for supportive intervention. Topics are addressed from clinical, supportive care, and interdisciplinary perspectives. Ideal for those planning to work with older adults in counseling, health care, hospice, and/or community support settings.

GERON 4680 Introduction to Gerontological Practice: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC WK 4680. Prerequisites: Junior/senior undergraduate or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor or program director. This course introduces key concepts and practices in the evaluation and care of older adults. It is intended for students considering aging-focused careers in the social service or healthcare fields. Topics include developmental and health-related theories of aging, functional and psychosocial aspects of aging, working with older adults in various service settings, multi and interdisciplinary team approaches, and basic standards of professional conduct that apply across professions.

GERON 4700 Successful Aging: Individual & Societal Perspectives: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior/senior undergraduate or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor or program director. This course addresses key components of successful aging, including avoidance of disease, maintenance of good mental and physical function, and sustained engagement in life. Students become familiar with the different intra- and extra-personal determinants of successful aging and learn to distinguish between the concepts of successful and productive aging. Also discussed is the impact of societal, economic and political context on success in aging (e.g. health care delivery, entitlement programs, technology, globalization, volunteerism, and culture).

GERON 4720 Ageless Arts: Creativity in Later Life: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC 4720. Prerequisites: Junior/senior undergraduate or graduate standing, or permission of the instructor or program director. This course examines how the lives of older adults are enriched through engagement in artistic, creative activities. Key approaches to creative aging are explored, with emphasis on benefits to physical health, emotional well-being, and interpersonal connection. Influencing factors are examined, including ageism, generativity, family and personal networks, environmental resources, sensory and cognitive deficits, and other health and physical changes of aging. The works of historical and current artists - painters, novelists, filmmakers, playwrights, musicians and others - are surveyed with an emphasis on products from later in the life course. Finally, the therapeutic benefits of creativity are examined through evidence-based research and the personal narratives of successful senior artists.

GERON 5361 Advanced Social Gerontology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. An examination of sociological theories of aging, technological and social change and its effects on the environment of older people, and prejudice and discrimination against the elderly.

GERON 5376 Psychopathology and Aging: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Recent theory and research in mental health issues for older populations. The primary focus is on major psychological disorders prevalent among older adults and in assessment and treatment approaches for aging populations.

GERON 5420 Research Methods and Analysis I: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admission to the MSG Program or graduate standing. The first of a two-course sequence designed to provide students with the knowledge base and skills for using the scientific method to advance gerontological knowledge, theory and evidence-based practice. Focuses on research methods employed in aging-related studies, with a special emphasis on the critical evaluation of academic studies and the evidentiary basis of key findings. Covers quantitative and qualitative approaches, research design, sampling procedures, measurement, use of results, impact of research, and ethical considerations.

GERON 5440 Sociocultural Aspects of Aging: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 5440. Prerequisites: Graduate status or consent of the instructor or program director. Focuses on the variety of solutions encountered in different sociocultural contexts for dealing with the problems, challenges and opportunities of growing old. It is organized around topics that are of concern to both anthropology and social gerontology: the status of the aged, intergenerational relations, aging in modernizing societies, ethnic dimensions of aging in complex societies, health in later life, death and dying. Both in-depth case studies and cross-cultural comparisons are examined in an effort to arrive at a culturally informed assessment of factors affecting aging and the aged in the United States.

GERON 5450 Research Methods and Analysis II: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: GERON 5420 or equivalent. An advanced course focused on the framing and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data to advance gerontological knowledge, theory, and evidence-based practice. Students learn to use and interpret various statistical procedures for analyzing qualitative and quantitative data (including bivariate and multivariate analyses). Students apply various analytic techniques using computer software applications.

GERON 6120 Theory and Practice with Older Adults: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC WK 6120. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Examines theory and empirically-based assessment and intervention models for work with the elderly. It includes the life circumstances of older adults and how that differs from younger adult populations; how ethnicity, gender, social class, and sexual orientation interact with age and create special intervention issues; discussion of ethical and value issues (e.g. client autonomy, rationing of health care); examination of family and community resources in providing care; and interventions with physically or mentally disabled elders and elders in residential settings.

GERON 6441 Aging and Health Behavior: 3 semester hours

Same as PSYCH 6441. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course examines sociocultural influences on health care practices of older adults. The role of social support and other social resources in the health behavior of older adults is emphasized. Topics include self care decisions, formal service utilization, family caregiving, and planned interventions for older adults.

GERON 6443 Health Care Policy: 3 semester hours

Same as P P ADM 6430, POL SCI 6443, and SOC WK 6443. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Survey course examining current issues in health policy that face the nation. Policies are placed in a historical context to show how issues have been influenced by different political and economic conditions. Secondary consequences and limitations of current trends in health policy are explored.

GERON 6444 Seminar in Public Policy and Aging: 3 semester hours

Same as P P ADM 6444, and POL SCI 6444. The study of specialized issues and methods related to federal, state, and local policies that affect the elderly. Potential policy areas to be covered include: housing, taxation, mental health, transportation, etc. May be repeated for credit, provided the subject matter is different.

GERON 6449 Issues In Retirement: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. This course examines macro and micro issues of retirement in the United States--its processes, causes, and consequences--in relation to economic market conditions, demographic changes, and programs and policies that are targeted to support the elderly (e.g., Social Security). It also examines issues relating to older women and retirement.

GERON 6450 Gerontological Assessment: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC WK 6450. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course provides an overview of psychosocial assessment with older adults and their family caregivers. major areas of gerontological assessment practice are considered, including dementia, mood disorders, suicide, grief, alcoholism, elder abuse/neglect, family caregiving, and interdisciplinary team issues.

GERON 6470 Epidemiology of Aging: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. This course reviews the distribution and determinants of health-related conditions and functional concerns in older populations. An emphasis is placed on key concepts and methodological considerations for conducting epidemiological studies. Students learn abut the epidemiology of selected diseases, syndromes and conditions common to older age, including various trajectories of physical and cognitive decline. Also discussed are the roles that epidemiological data play in the development of interventions to control and prevent age-related disease and inform public health decision-making and evidence-based geriatric practice.

GERON 6490 Directed Study: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. Designed to give the student an opportunity to pursue a more in-depth study of a problem area in gerontology than is normally covered in more formal courses. May be repeated for a total of six credit hours.

GERON 6495 Practicum in Gerontology: 3 semester hours

This course provides supervised work experience in an agency that serves older adults. Students are required to complete a minimum of 150 clock hours at the practicum site.

GERON 6496 Advanced Practicum in Gerontology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: GERON 6495 and consent of instructor This course provides advanced practicum experience beyond GERON 6495. Students must complete a minimum of 150 clock hours of supervised field work (service or research) with older adults.

GERON 6497 Interdisciplinary Geriatric Care: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Same as VIS SCI 6497. Interdisciplinary approaches that address the medical, social, instrumental and functional needs of older adults will be examined. Information about geriatric care management and social issues affecting the well-being of older adults will be provided. Clinical, theoretical, and educational perspectives will be presented.

GERON 6498 Advanced Seminar In Gerontology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course will provide in-depth analysis of specialized topics in gerontology which are not covered in required courses. (Course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits, assuming topics are different.).

GERON 6500 Practicum in Geronotological Research: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: GERON 6495 and consent of the instructor. A supervised social science research experience involving a combination of two or more of the following activities: literature review, hypothesis generation, study design and proposal, IRB application, participant recruitment, data collection, data management, data analysis, and report/article generation.

GERON 6510 Directed Research in Aging: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor. Designed to give the student an opportunity to explore a question of interest from a qualitative and/or quantitative research perspective. This supervised experience may include one or more of the following activities (depending on enrolled hours): literature review, hypothesis generation, study design and proposal, IRB application, participant recruitment, data collection, data management, data analysis, and report/article generation.

Thomas M. Meuser
Professor and Clinical Psychologist
Ph.D., University of Missouri - St. Louis
Sociology, Gerontology & Gender

Ann M. Steffen
Professor and Clinical Psychologist
Ph.D., Indiana University
Psychological Sciences

Margo Lea Hurwicz
Associate Professor and Medical Anthropologist
Ph.D., University of California-Los Angeles
Sociology, Gerontology & Gender

Shirley L. Porterfield
Associate Professor and Health Economist
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
Social Work

Huei-Wern Shen
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Michigan
Social Work