Social Work

Campus Address: 121 Bellerive Hall
Web Site: http://www.umsl.edu/~socialwk/
Main Number: 314-516-6385
Fax Number: 314-516-6416

General Information

Degrees and Areas of Concentration

The Social Work program offers courses leading to a bachelor of social work (B.S.W.), a master of social work (M.S.W.), and a minor in social work. The B.S.W. and the M.S.W. programs are fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. The programs stress the critical, empirical, and applied aspects of social work, incorporating a liberal arts perspective throughout the curriculum. There is a strong accent on community and agency field work as an integral part of the program. Professional social work education enables students to integrate the knowledge, values, and skills of the profession into competent practice.

Students must apply for admission into the B.S.W. and the M.S.W. programs. After admission, undergraduate social work majors and Master's students should obtain a copy of the Student Handbook (available on the School of Social Work's web page). Students in both programs must meet with a social work adviser for advisement each semester, and must set up an appointment with the practicum office and attend a series of pre-practicum orientation sessions one semester prior to enrolling in the practicum.

Career Outlook

The bachelor of social work program prepares persons for entry-level employment in social welfare agencies, schools, hospitals, correctional institutions, social action and community organizations, and day care, geriatric, or rehabilitation and residential centers. The master of social work program prepares professionals for advanced social work practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Individuals currently working in social welfare can develop skills and increase employment and job advancement opportunities with the B.S.W. and M.S.W. degrees.

Undergraduate Studies

Objectives of the BSW Program

The BSW program has the following educational outcomes. Students who graduate with a BSW will be generalist practitioners who:

  • Identify as professional social worker and conduct themselves accordingly.
  • Understand the values and ethics of the social work profession and the relationship between personal beliefs and values, professional values and ethics, and professional social work practice.
  • Utilize critical thinking, capacity building, analytical and communication skills to synthesize and analyze information to inform social work practice.
  • Understand the importance of diversity, difference, power, and privilege in shaping life experiences for diversity competent practice.
  • Possess the knowledge and skills to fight effectively against human oppression, discrimination, and social inequity and to formulate and foster social change initiatives to advance social and economic justice.
  • Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research to evaluate professional practice and /or the professional practice of others.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment to guide assessment and intervention.
  • Understand major social and welfare policies and analyze and formulate policies to advocate for social and economic justice.
  • Use leadership skills to respond to the changing context of social work practice.
  • Utilize skills of engagement, assessment, intervention and evaluation, including theory and practice skills, across all levels of practice.

General Education Requirements

Majors must satisfy the university and college general education requirements, although proficiency in a foreign language is recommended but not required.

Courses required for the B.S.W. degree may not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis except SOC WK 4800 and SOC WK 4850.

Admission Requirements

Students entering UMSL as freshman and as transfer students should indicate a pre-social work major. Students must apply to the program concurrently with SOC WK 3100. Admission to the program is conditional upon the successful completion of all necessary requirements.

Requirements for Admission to the Social Work program:

  • Junior standing
  • Have a GPA of 2.75 or higher in social work related areas.
  • Submission of:
    • Application for admission to the social work program.
    • Two letters of reference: one from a college or university professor and one other from a work or volunteer experience supervisor.
  • Completion of SOC WK 2000, SOC WK 2001, and SOC WK 2200 or their equivalents or completion of an A.A. in Human Services.
  • Satisfactory completion of all courses listed as prerequisites for , SOC WK 3210, and SOC WK 3510.

Applicants may be asked to meet with the social work Admissions Committee.

Bachelor of Social Work

Students must have a minimum GPA of 2.5 in social work and related-area requirement courses to enter field practicum. Candidates for this degree program must complete the core requirements including the following social work courses:

SOC WK 2000Social Work And Social Issues3
SOC WK 2001Social Work and Social Issues Lab1
SOC WK 2200Social Welfare As A Social Institution3
SOC WK 3100Introduction To Strategies for Social Work Practice3
SOC WK 3210Social Issues And Social Policy Development3
Select one of the following:3
Research Design In Social Work
Research Methods
Research Methods
Research Methods In Criminology And Criminal Justice
SOC WK 3510Human Behavior In The Social Environment3
SOC WK 3700Diversity And Social Justice3
SOC WK 4110Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families, and Groups3
SOC WK 4300Social Work Practice with Communities3
SOC WK 4350Human Service Organizations3
SOC WK 4800
  & SOC WK 4850
Supervised Field Experience In Social Work I
   and Supervised Field Experience In Social Work II
8
SOC WK 4801
  & SOC WK 4851
Integratve Field Experience Seminar I
   and Integrative Field Seminar II
4
Total Hours43

A minimum of 43 hours or a maximum of 50 hours must be taken in social work. A minimum of 30 hours is required in related area departments.

Evaluation of social work transfer credits will be done by a social work adviser on an individual basis.

Related Area Requirements

The following courses, or their alternatives, are required:

ECON 1000Introduction To The American Economy3
or ECON 1005 Family Economics and Household Development
POL SCI 1100Introduction To American Politics3
PSYCH 1003General Psychology3
Biology
Select one of the following:3-4
Human Biology
Human Physiology And Anatomy I
Human Physiology And Anatomy II
Environmental Biology
Sociology
SOC 1010Introduction To Sociology3
SOC 2160Social Psychology3
Select one of the following:3-4
Social Statistics
Psychological Statistics
Statistical Analysis In Criminology And Criminal Justice
At least 9 additional hours must be taken in social work, sociology, political science, psychology, gender studies, anthropology, criminology and criminal justice, or economics at the 2000 level or above. 9
Total Hours30-32

Hours taken in social work will apply toward the maximum of 50 hours that may be taken in social work courses. The Social Work program may require students to pass a placement test to enroll in the next level course, provided this test or its equivalent is administered to all students seeking to enroll in that course.

Social work majors must have a grade of C- or better and maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or better in all course work specifically required for the major, with satisfactory grades in practicum.

Note: Anthropology, biological sciences, economics, and Spanish courses are strongly recommended by graduate schools of social work.

Requirements for the Minor in Social Work

Candidates must complete the following social work courses:

SOC WK 2000Social Work And Social Issues3
SOC WK 2200Social Welfare As A Social Institution3
SOC WK 3100Introduction To Strategies for Social Work Practice3
SOC WK 3210Social Issues And Social Policy Development3
Select one additional social work course at the 3000 level or above.3
Total Hours15

Graduate Studies

Goals of the Master of Social Work

The goals of the M.S.W. program of the University of Missouri- St. Louis are consistent with the land-grant public service mission of the University, the MSW feasibility study, and the educational policy statement of CSWE and are to:

  • Prepare students with the professional knowledge, skills, values and ethics for effective social work practice.
  • Prepare students to utilize critical thinking and capacity building skills at all levels of social work practice.
  • Prepare students to analyze and address dynamic issues and challenges facing diverse populations and to promote social justice and positive social change.
  • Prepare students to conduct and utilize research to respond effectively to dynamic social contexts, issues and problems found in social work practice.
  • Assist and support faculty in the advancement of social work knowledge, teaching and service.
  • Develop and participate in collaborative activities with social agencies, communities, organizations, and governments that will enhance student learning, enrich faculty research and teaching, and promote human and societal well-being.

Master of Social Work

Admission Requirements

Admission to the M.S.W. Program requires admission to the University of Missouri-St. Louis Graduate School and acceptance by the School of Social Work. Applicants to the program must meet the following requirements to be considered for admission:

  • Completion of a bachelor's degree from a college or university accredited by a recognized regional accrediting organization.
  • Completion of a liberal arts education including courses in the humanities, the social and behavioral sciences, and the physical sciences. These courses must include one in human biology and one in statistics.
  • Attainment of a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale for all undergraduate course work and a grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale in the major field.
  • Submission of the following documents by the admission deadline:
  • A completed application to the UMSL Graduate School and a completed M.S.W. supplemental application
  • Three written essays.
  • Three letters of reference. – One from a professor in your major field of study, and one from a work or volunteer supervisor or other professional reference. Letters from employees/supervisees, friends, and family may not be used.
  • Official transcripts from all colleges and university attended.
  • Applicable fees.

Application Deadline

The deadline for application to the MSW program is February 15 for admission in the following fall semester. See School of Social Work's website, for more details.

Admissions to the Advanced Standing Program

Applicants with a B.S.W., B.A.S.W., or B.S.S.W., from an accredited social work program may be given up to 24 credit hours of advanced standing for foundation social work courses. Admission to the advanced standing program is available to applicants who meet the general admission requirements and who:

  1. have earned a bachelor's degree in social work from a program accredited by the Council on Social Work Education within five years of applying to the M.S.W. Program, and
  2. have earned a grade point average of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale in the social work foundation curriculum, and no less than a B in all courses that are applicable.

Course Waivers

A student who does not have a bachelor's degree in social work but who can document successful completion (with at least a B) of foundation courses from an accredited B.S.W. program within the last five years will be given course waivers and be allowed to replace these courses with electives.

Students from non-accredited B.S.W. programs or students who have taken comparable course work in other undergraduate programs may take place-out examinations for select foundation courses; waivers will be given if students successfully pass place-out examinations. The waiver does not provide graduate credit; it is a mechanism for allowing elective courses to be substituted for required foundation courses.

Academic credit cannot be given for life experience and/or previous work experience, in whole or in part, in lieu of field practicum or foundation year courses.

Degree Requirements

The M.S.W. is a two-year program comprising a foundation year and a concentration year. All students are required to take the foundation year courses. These provide a common base of knowledge across all practice settings and populations. Beyond the general requirements of the Graduate School, the department requires a minimum of 60 semester hours of course work, of which 48 must be at the 5000 or 6000 level and 48 must be in social work or cross-listed with social work, including the following foundation courses:

SOC WK 5100Generalist Social Work Practice3
SOC WK 5200Social Policy And Social Services3
SOC WK 5300Community Practice And Social Change3
SOC WK 5350Social Work And Human Service Organizations3
SOC WK 5410Social Work Research Methods And Analysis I3
SOC WK 5450Social Work Research Methods And Analysis II3
SOC WK 5500Foundations Of Human Behavior In The Social Environment3
SOC WK 5700Diversity and Social Justice for Social Work3
SOC WK 5800Graduate Field Practicum I4
SOC WK 5801Foundation Field Practicum Seminar2
Total Hours30

Upon completion of the 30 credits of foundation year requirements, students move into a year of specialization, called the concentration. The concentration year requires 30 hours of course work that includes up to 12 hours of elective graduate-level courses approved by the adviser. Students plan their degree program to reflect their career interests in the following concentration areas:

  • Family Practice
  • Social Work Leadership and Management 
  • Gerontology

The MSW program has organized courses into areas of emphasis which are suggested courses based on interest. 

To remain in good standing, students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.

The field practicum is an integral part of the concentration year. Students will complete 300 hours (20 hours of full-time work each week) of M.S.W. supervised practice in an agency during the second semester of the foundation year, and 600 hours total (20 hours of full-time work per week) in the concentration year. A student must receive a grade of B or better in the first-year field practicum course in order to be eligible to enter the second year field practicum. S/U grades are given for the concentration practicum.

Part Time Status

Students who enter the program as part-time students complete the foundation year in two years and the concentration course work in an additional two years.

All students must complete the M.S.W. in four years.

Sample Four Year Plan

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
BIOL 10123General Education6
SOC 10103ECON 1000 or 10053
ENGL 11003BIOL 11023
PSYCH 10033Elective or minor3
General Education3 
 15 15
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
SOC WK 20003SOC WK 22003
SOC WK 20011PSYCH 21603
POL SCI 11003Social Science elective13
MATH 1020 or 10303General Education3
General Education3Elective or minor3
Elective or minor3 
 16 15
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
SOC WK 31003SOC WK 32103
ENGL 31003SOC WK 37003
Social Science elective13SOC WK 41103
SOC WK 35103SOC WK 3410, CRIMIN 2210, or PSYCH 22193
SOC 3220, CRIMIN 2220, or PSYCH 22013-4Social Science Elective13
 15-16 15
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
SOC WK 43003SOC WK 48504
SOC WK 43503SOC WK 48512
SOC WK 48004Elective or minor9
SOC WK 48012 
Elective or minor3 
 15 15
Total Hours: 121-122
1

 Nine hours must be taken in SOC WK, SOC, PSYCH, POL SCI, CRIMIN, ANTHRO, ECON or GS at the 2000 level or above.

Please Note: This plan is an example of what a four year plan could look like for a typical student. Placement exam scores in math as well as the completion of coursework may change the plan. It should not be used in the place of regular academic advising appointments. All students are encouraged to meet with their advisor each semester. All requirements are subject to change

Courses

SOC WK 2000 Social Work And Social Issues: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC 1010 or PSYCH 1003 Examination of the network of social programs and services developed in response to social problems in modern urban communities and the various roles and functions performed by the helping professions. Students will be introduced to basic values, skills, and training involved in a helping relationship as well as the characteristics of clients seeking help and professionals engaged in the helping process.

SOC WK 2001 Social Work and Social Issues Lab: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: Simultaneous with SOC WK 2000. The lab session will be used for field trips to social agencies which will allow students to better understand the many roles social workers are involved in This course is required for social work majors.

SOC WK 2102 Introduction To Gender Studies: 3 semester hours

Same as HIST 2102, SOC 2102, and GS 2102. This core class is required for all Women's and Gender Studies Certificate earners. This class introduces students to cultural, political and historical issues that shape gender. Through a variety of disciplinary perspectives in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, the course familiarizes students with diverse female and male experiences and gendered power relationships.

SOC WK 2200 Social Welfare As A Social Institution: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: SOC WK 2000 or consent of instructor. A study of the: 1) development of social welfare service and the philosophy underlying the present practices and systems, 2) present social welfare programs with particular emphasis given to public income maintenance provisions, 3) special welfare needs of the black, elderly, women, indian and hispanic americans, and 4) Development of social work as a profession. This course may be taken by non-social work majors.

SOC WK 2201 Social Welfare As A Social Institution Laboratory: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: Simultaneous with SOC WK 2200. The lab session will be used for field trips to social agencies. This course is required for all Social Work majors.

SOC WK 2330 Asians In Migration: 3 semester hours

This course is a comparative analysis of the social and cultural diversity of the peoples of East, South, and Southeast Asia. Study focuses on their reasons for migration and the extent and quality of the social and cultural connections they maintain to their homelands. Implications of these cultures for students in a variety of disciplines are explored. This course satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

SOC WK 3100 Introduction To Strategies for Social Work Practice: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 2200, SOC 1010 and PSYCH 1003 or permission of instructor. A presentation of basic knowlege, skills, and theory used for entry-level professional practice, such as problem assessment, interviewing skills, crisis intervention and referral procedures. The course objectives will also be to teach students how to help clients negotiate systems effectively, and to use resources, services, and opportunities.

SOC WK 3210 Social Issues And Social Policy Development: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 2200, POL SCI 1100, and ECON 1000. The identification of issues concerning governmental provisions to meet contemporary social needs, with analysis of the principles and values underlying alternative solutions. A study of the processes by which citizen opinions and public policies evolve and are implemented in areas such as income maintenance, crime and delinquency, employment, family and child welfare, and public mental health.

SOC WK 3410 Research Design In Social Work: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Satisfaction of Math Proficiency requirement and either SOC 3220, CRIMIN 2220, or PSYCH 2201. Students explore research concepts and procedures (hypothesis testing, sampling, measurement, and design) emphasizing issues in social work research. Students learn to collect, analyze and present data.

SOC WK 3510 Human Behavior In The Social Environment: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: BIOL 1012 and SOC 2160 or PSYCH 2160 or permission of instructor. This course will focus on the normative stages in the life span, and specifically, how human development is affected by the physical environment and social status characteristics. Empirical information and theoretical views onhuman development will be included. Human development will be viewed as a complex interaction of individual developmentalstages with family, social, and community systems.

SOC WK 3700 Diversity And Social Justice: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 3700. Prerequisites: PSYCH 2160 or SOC 2160; and SOC WK 3100 taken prior or concurrently. Analyzes the structure, dynamics, and consequences of social and economic injustice, and the impact on diverse groups in American society. Examines theoretical models and practice principles for work with diverse groups.

SOC WK 4110 Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families, and Groups: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 3100, SOC WK 3510, and SOC WK 3700 taken prior to or concurrently. This course continues the presentation of basic knowledge and practice skills for entry level professional practice begun in SOC WK 3100. It builds on the generalized helping model, incorporating specialized skills for working with specific groups of clients (e.g., children, aged, mentally ill, and physically handicapped), with families and small groups.

SOC WK 4300 Social Work Practice with Communities: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 3210 taken prior to or concurrently, senior standing. Continuation of basic practice skills with emphasis given to analysis and intervention at the community level. Includes assessment of community assets and needs and the development of community-level interventions. Emphasis is also placed on helping the practitioner evaluate the impact of intervention.

SOC WK 4350 Human Service Organizations: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: POL SCI 1100; PSYCH 2160 or SOC 2160 and admission to the BSW program or consent from instructor. This course seeks to help develop knowledge of organizational functioning and an understanding of organizational history, principles and philosophy of effective administration. Students develop theoretical and empirical understanding of groups and organizations, including concepts such as power and authority, organizational structure, goals, membership, leadership, motivation, technology and organizational culture. They will learn to develop a budget and to submit proposals for grant funding. Using a systemic perspective with organizations as settings for practice students learn to function in and through organizations.

SOC WK 4376 Mental Health And Aging: 3 semester hours

Same as GERON 4376 and PSYCH 4376. Prerequisites: 9 hours of psychology, graduate standing, or consent of instructor. (MSW students normally take all foundation courses prior to enrolling in this course.) This course provides a survey of theory and research in mental health issues for older populations, focusing on psychological and social aspects of mental health and impairment. The course details approaches to understanding prevalence, etiology, assessment, and treatment of the psychological disorders most commonly experienced by older adults, including anxiety, depression, delirium, and dementia, among others.

SOC WK 4398 Child Maltreatment: A Multidisciplinary Approach: 3 semester hours

SAME AS PSYCH 4398 and CAST 4398. Focuses on clinical aspects of child abuse with attention to identification, reporting, intervention and prevention. Perspectives from the disciplines of psychology and social work are provided.

SOC WK 4601 Abused And Neglected Children: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 3510 or equivalent. This course explores the major concepts necessary for understanding abused and neglected children and their families. Emphasis is placed on (1) defining the problem, including societal stresses which contribute to the abuse and neglect; (2) examining existing practice methods; and (3) understandin the role of the social worker on interdisciplinary teams.

SOC WK 4610 Intimate Partner Violence: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 4610. Prerequisites: SOC WK 3510. Focuses on theoretical and empirical understanding of domestic violence in US society and social work practice with battered women and their families. Addresses direct services, community organizing, and public policy changes to help end violence against women. Relationships between violence against women and other forms of oppression (e.g., racism, economic exploitation, heterosexism and social class) are explored.

SOC WK 4620 Addictions: Assessment And Intervention In Social Work Practice: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 4110 or SOC WK 5100 or equivalent, (or are taking concurrently), or consent of instructor. This class examines the interface of psychological, physical, social, and spiritual aspects of addiction. This practice class is designed to deepen students' abilities to address clients' issues related to addictions and addictive behaviors, including: prevention, assessment, and intervention. It builds on the generalized helping model within a systems perspective, and it introduces specialized skills for working with individuals, with specific groups of clients, with families, and with small groups.

SOC WK 4630 Gender Issues in Social Work: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 4630. Prerequisites: SOC WK 3700, GS 2102, or graduate standing. This course will help students become more sensitive to the social and welfare concerns based on gender. Topics may include work, education, family responsibilities, violence against women, and special health and mental health service needs. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how social action can be used to bring about positive change.

SOC WK 4641 Crisis Intervention: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: SOC WK 4110 or SOC WK 5100 or equivalent (or are taking concurrently), or consent of instructor. This course introduces students to the theoretical framework as well as the skills needed to understand and engage in effective crisis intervention. Students will learn a specialized model for assessment and intervention with people in crisis and will have an opportunity to apply this model to a variety of case situations.

SOC WK 4642 Non-Violent Crisis Intervention: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: Senior or Graduate Standing. Nonviolent Crisis Intervention is a nonharmful behavior management system designed to aid human service professionals in the management of disruptive and assaultive people. These techniques are used to reduce tension in agitated people, control anxiety during interventions, determine alternative approaches if a person becomes violent. Students will learn how to use nonverbal, paraverbal, verbal and physical intervention skills to maintain the best care and safety for clients.

SOC WK 4643 Social Work Practice with Individuals with Development Disabilities: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: Senior Standing This evidence based course exposes students to the diverse issues related to the services and support needed by individuals with development issues. Students will explore the complex social contexts in which this population lives and the appropriate interventions to meet the unique challenges facing these individuals.

SOC WK 4645 Social Work in Mental Health: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 3510 and SOC WK 4110 or the equivalent. The role of social work in the field of behavioral health has evolved over the last thirty years as the setting for service activity has shifted from inpatient facilities to community-based care and treatment. This course will integrate the basic components of good social work practice with the contemporary role of the social worker in the field of behavioral healthcare. This course will focus on practical applications of social work in the context of working with individuals and families dealing with mental health and/or addiction disorders with an emphasis on consumer empowerment and recovery.

SOC WK 4670 Cross Cultural Perspectives On Social Policy: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 3210 or equivalent. This course examines social policies in different countries, which may include social insurance, social assistance, health care, and social services. Using a comparative framework, the course examines the nature of government involvement, and public and private sector relations. It examines adequacy, equity, inclusiveness, comprehensiveness, effectiveness, and efficiency of social policies in the countries being studied.

SOC WK 4680 Introduction to Gerontological Practice: 3 semester hours

Same as GERON 4680. Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate or graduate standing. This course introduces key concepts and practices in the evaluation and care of older adults. It is intended for students considering aging-focused careers in the social service or healthcare fields. Topics include developmental and health-related theories of aging, functional and psychosocial aspects of aging, working with older adults in various service settings, multi and interdisciplinary team approaches, and basic standards of professional conduct that apply across professions.

SOC WK 4800 Supervised Field Experience In Social Work I: 4 semester hours

Prequisite: SOC WK 3100, SOC WK 4110. SOC WK 4110 must be taken prior to or concurrently with SOC WK 4801; consent of instructor. This course provides students practice experience in social service agencies. Students work at the agencies approximately 20 hours per week. The purpose of this experience is to familiarize students with agency operations. Selection of the agency is based on student education needs.

SOC WK 4801 Integratve Field Experience Seminar I: 2 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and concurrent registration in SOC WK 4800. This seminar provides an opportunity for students to integrate previous course work with their experience in social work agencies. Classroom discussion will emphasize direct practice issues.

SOC WK 4850 Supervised Field Experience In Social Work II: 4 semester hours

Prerequisite: SOC WK 4800, SOC WK 4801 and consent of instructor this is a continuation of agency practice experience. Students work at the agency approximately 20 hours per week and continue at the same agency as SOC WK 4800 or change agencies with the consent of the instructor.

SOC WK 4851 Integrative Field Seminar II: 2 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and concurrent registration in SOC WK 4850. This seminar is a continuation of SOC WK 4801. Classroom discussion will emphasize adminstration and community organization issues.

SOC WK 4900 Special Study: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Independent study through advanced readings in method and philosophy on a topic of particular interest, or field research in an agency.

SOC WK 5100 Generalist Social Work Practice: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 4110 or equiv or admission to MSW program Using a problem-solving approach, students develop theoretical and empirical understanding and practical application of generalist social work methods. Students gain knowledge and skills that include interviewing, assessment, crisis and shortterm intervention, contracting, resource development, and case documentation needed for competent direct practice with diverse populations.

SOC WK 5200 Social Policy And Social Services: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 3210 or POL SCI 2420 or POL SCI 3460 or equivalent or admission to the MSW program Covers the history and development of social welfare policies, legislative processes, and existing social welfare programs. Examines frameworks for social policy analysis, analyzes how social and economic conditions impact the process of social policy development and implementation, and introduces policy practice in social work.

SOC WK 5300 Community Practice And Social Change: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 3300, or SOC 3344, or equivalent or admission to the MSW program Focuses on economic, social, and political theory and research on communities and social change. Examines conceptual models of community practice within the generalist model and develops skills in organizing, advocacy, and planning.

SOC WK 5350 Social Work And Human Service Organizations: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 3510 and SOC WK 4300 or PSYCH 3318 or BUS AD 3611 or equivalent or admission to the MSW program. Students develop theoretical and empirical understanding of groups and organizations, including concepts such as power and authority, structure, goals, membership, leadership, motivation, technology and organizational culture. Using organizations as settings for social work practice and as targets for change, students learn strategies and skills for assessment and intervention.

SOC WK 5410 Social Work Research Methods And Analysis I: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 3410 or SOC 3230 and SOC 3231 or equivalent and SOC 3220 or equivalent or admission to MSW program. The first of a two-course sequence designed to provide students with the knowledge base and skills for using scientific method to advance social practice, knowledge, and theory. Focuses on research methods at different levels (e.g., individual, group, organization, and community) and critical analysis and synthesis of academic literature necessary for effective, evidence-based social work practice. Covers quantitative and qualitative methods, research design, sampling, measurement, use of results, impact of research, and ethical considerations.

SOC WK 5450 Social Work Research Methods And Analysis II: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 5410 or equivalent. Advanced course, focusing on analysis of qualitative and quantitative data to advanced social work practice, knowledge, and theory. Students learn to use and interpret various statistical procedures for analyzing quantitative data, including bivariate and multivariate analysis, and content and statistical analysis for qualitative data. Students apply these analytic techniques to social work case material using computer software applications.

SOC WK 5500 Foundations Of Human Behavior In The Social Environment: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 5500. Prerequisites: SOC WK 3510 or equivalent or admission to the MSW program. Focuses on theoretical and empirical understanding of human be havior in the social environment using a life-span perspective Introduces biological, behavioral, cognitive, and sociocultural theories of individuals, families, and small groups, and their implications for the professional social worker's understanding of socioeconomic status, gender, disability, ethnicity, race, and sexual orientation.

SOC WK 5610 Mechanisms Of Aging I: The Aging Body: 1 semester hour

Same as GERON 5610 and PSYCH 5610. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and BIOL 1102 or equivalent (MSW students normally take all foundation courses prior to enrolling in this course.) Introduces students with a social science/humanities background to the normal changes in the biology and chemistry of the aging human body and how these changes affect behavior.

SOC WK 5611 Mechanisms Of Aging II: The Aging Brain: 1 semester hour

Same as GERON 5611 and PSYCH 5611. Prerequisites: SOC WK 5610, GERON 5610, PSYCH 5610 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. (MSW students normally take all foundation coruses prior to enrolling in this course.) Provides students with a social sciences/humanities background a basic introduction to the biology and chemistry of the aging human brain and nervous system and how these systems impact behavior.

SOC WK 5612 Mechanisms Of Aging III: Diseases Of Aging: 1 semester hour

Same as GERON 5612 and PSYCH 5612. Prerequisites: SOC WK 5610 and SOC WK 5611, or GERON 5610 and GERON 5611, or PSYCH 5610 and PSYCH 5611 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. (MSW students normally take all foundation courses prior to enrolling in this course.) Provides students with a social sciences/humanities background with information on how diseases associated with aging exacerbate the effects of aging on the human body, mind, and behavior.

SOC WK 5620 Dying, Grief & Death in Older Adulthood: 3 semester hours

Same as GERON 5620. Prerequisite: Six hours of graduate level gerontology, psychology, counseling and/or social work coursework, or special approval from the instructor. Undergraduates in their senior year may also request approval for entry from the Director of Gerontology. For those planning to work with older adults in counseling, healthcare, hospice and/or community support settings. Will examine trajectories to death in older age, the dying process, influences of medical and aging-related conditions, euthanasia and suicide, life extension and longevity, personal beliefs and existential responses, how individuals and families cope, ethical concerns, and strategies for supportive intervention. Topics are addressed from clinical, supportive care, and interdisciplinary perspectives.

SOC WK 5635 Social Work Practice with Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Populations: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 5635. Prerequisites: SOC WK 5100 and SOC WK 5500. This advanced practice course focuses on developing the theoretical and empirical knowledge and practice skills necessary for effective social work practice with lesbian, gay male, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons and their families. This course aims to explore deeper understanding of LGBT identities, families, health and mental health challenges, and issues of political advocacy.

SOC WK 5700 Diversity and Social Justice for Social Work: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 5700. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. Analyzes the structure, dynamics, and consequences of social and economic injustice, and the impact on diverse groups in American society. Examines theoretical models and practice principles for work with diverse groups.

SOC WK 5800 Graduate Field Practicum I: 2-4 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. Provides integrative field experience in generalist social work practice. May be taken for 2-4 hours' credit depending on time in agency during semester, 75 contact hours = 1 credit hour. May be repeated once. A maximum of 4 credit hours will apply to the M.S.W. degree.

SOC WK 5801 Foundation Field Practicum Seminar: 2 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. Integrates academic content from foundation course work and experiential learning in field placements. Goals are to conceptualize the problem solving process in field practice, synthesize theory into a social work approach that encourages creative use of self, and underscore ethics and service to diverse groups in practices.

SOC WK 6120 Theory And Practice With Older Adults: 3 semester hours

Same as GERON 6120. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Examines theory and empirically-based assessment and intervention models for work with the elderly. It includes the life circumstances of older adults and how that differs from younger adult populations; how ethnicity, gender, social class, and sexual orientation interact with age and create special intervention issues; discussion of ethical and value issues (e.g. client autonomy, rationing of health care); examination of family and community resources in providing care; and interventions with physically or mentally disabled elders and elders in residential settings.

SOC WK 6130 Interviewing Older Adults and Life Review: 3 semester hours

Same as GERON 6130. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. This course combines training in interviewing techniques with video production. Students will learn how to conduct life review interviews with older adults, and then take these skills into the community by interviewing older adults living in various settings. Students will learn how to use a digital vide camera and edit video clips on the computer. Student-conducted interviews will be viewed by the instructor and classmates, issues associated with aging will be discussed, and constructive feedback provided. Some of the video clips developed in the course will become part of an educational video clip library.

SOC WK 6150 Theory And Practice With Families: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 5100 or equivalent, graduate standing and departmental approval. This course will examine theoretical approaches to scocial work with families, including the impact of the social environment. Skills will include assessment and multi-disciplinary intervention with multi-problem families. Special emphasis will be given to poverty, chemical dependency, intra-familial violence, physical and mental illnesses, and working with family members of diverse cultures, socioeconomic backgrounds, races, sexual orientation, and ability. Values and ethics will be emphasized.

SOC WK 6160 Advanced Social Work Practice Across the Life Span: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 5100 or equivalent or consent of instructor Examines theory and empirically-based assessment and intervention strategies for diverse populations across the life span. Students will gain basic mastery of behavioral, cognitivebehavioral, brief therapeutic and supportive psychotherapeutic techniques and their appropriate use with children, adolescents, and young, middle and older adults. The course will also consider the effects of family, peers, and societal context (e.g. poverty, racism, and ageism) in understanding psycho-social stressors particular to each life era, including academic failure and delinquency, substance abuse, physical and mental illness, family disruption and instability, and grief and loss issues.

SOC WK 6200 Family Policy: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 5200 or equivalent or consent of instructor and graduate standing. Examines policy development, implementation and impact of social policies on children, youth, and families. International national, and state policies that affect basic family needs will be the focus, including topics such as economic support, health care, child care and protection, and child and youth development. Intended and unintended consequences of existing policies on the family will be examined as well as future policy directions.

SOC WK 6250 Social And Economic Development Policy: 3 semester hours

Same as POL SCI 6418. Prerequisites: SOC WK 5200 or eqivalent or consent of instructor and graduate standing. Examines major trends and alternatives in social and economic development policy and practice in state, national, and international perspectives. Students will develop skills in policy analysis and development.

SOC WK 6300 Leadership and Management in Nonprofit Organizations: 3 semester hours

Same as P P ADM 6300 and POL SCI 6300. Prerequisites: Graduate standing required. Addresses the role and scope of the independent sector in the United States, as well as the leadership and management of nonprofit organizations within that sector. Topics include the economic and political scope of the independent sector, the role of volunteerism in a democratic society, and the role and scope of philanthropy. Topics in voluntary organization management and leadership include the dynamics, functions, and membership structure of NPOs, especially staff-board and other volunteer relations; governance and management of NPOs; resource mobilization; and program development management and evaluation.

SOC WK 6310 American Philanthropy and Nonprofit Resource Development: 3 semester hours

Same as P P ADM 6310. Prerequisites: Graduate standing required. This course addresses the history, philosophy, roles and scope of philanthropy in the United States, including its role in the nonprofit, voluntary sector. It further examines the contemporary forces which impact philanthropy and charitable giving, both by institutions and individuals. The course examines the effective planning and management of development programs (e.g., annual giving), fund raising vehicles (e.g., mail solicitations) and the fund raising process, form planning through donor relations.

SOC WK 6311 Staff Management Issues in Nonprofit Organizations: 1 semester hour

Same as P P ADM 6311. Prerequisites: Graduate standing required. This course addresses issues involved in managing staff in nonprofit organizations. The course will cover the following topics: fundamentals of staff supervision; balancing supervisory processes with counseling and coaching; selecting, hiring, evaluating, and terminating staff' legal issues that affect these processes.

SOC WK 6312 Legal Issues in Managing Nonprofit Organizations: 1 semester hour

Same as P P ADM 6312. Preequisites: Graduate Standing required. This course addresses legal issues involved in managing and governing nonprofit organizations. The course will cover the following topics: The Board as steward of the organizaton; Director and officer liability; tax laws concerning charitable giving; legal issues in managing staff and volunteers (e.g., hiring, evaluating, and terminating employees); Missouri nonprofit law.

SOC WK 6313 Financial Issues in Managing Nonprofit Organizations: 1 semester hour

Same as P P ADM 6313. This course addresses financial issues involved in governing and managing nonprofit organizations. The course will cover the following topics: Cash flow analysis; budgeting; fund accounting; cost accounting (determining costs for programs and services); understanding and using standard financial statements, including balance sheets, cash flow statements, statements of activity, and operating and capital budgets.

SOC WK 6400 Practice And Program Evaluation: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 5410 and SOC WK 5450 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Provides specialized knowledge in the use of qualitative and quantitative research skills to evaluate the effectiveness of social work practice. Topics will include single system design, group designs, and program evaluation. Students will design and conduct a research project associated with their advanced social work practicum. Results will be presented to the class and the agency. Value and ethical issues, particularly those relevant to client race and gender will be emphasized as students develop and conduct their research.

SOC WK 6443 Health Care Policy: 3 semester hours

Same as POL SCI 6443, P P ADM 6430, GERON 6443. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and consent of instructor. (MSW students will normally take the social policy foundation course prior to enrolling in this course.) Survey course examining current issues in health care policy that face the nation. Policies are placed in a historical context to show how issues have been influenced by different political and economic conditions. Secondary consequences and limitations of current trends in health policy are explored.

SOC WK 6449 Human Resources In The Public Sector: 3 semester hours

Same as POL SCI 6449 and P P ADM 6490 Prerequisites: P P ADM 6600 or consent of instructor. Presents an overview of personnel & labor relations in the public sector. Particular emphasis placed on issues which are unique to the public sector, such as the merit system, the questions of representative bureaucracy and the constraints of personnel in the nonprofit sector. The topics include personnel reforms in the federal sector, equal employment and affirmative action policies, testing, selection, hiring, comparable worth, job evaluation, and labor relations including grievance arbitration and collective bargaining.

SOC WK 6450 Gerontological Assessment: 3 semester hours

SOC WK 6491 Strategic And Program Planning For Nonprofit Organizations: 3 semester hours

Same as POL SCI 6490 and P P ADM 6550. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing or consent of Instructor. Strategic and program planning enable an organization to concentrate on efforts and set priorities guided by a mission, vision, and an understanding of its environment. Focus is on preparing a strategic plan and a program plan for a nonprofit organization and analyzing an organization's ability to deliver goods and/or services to its constituents in today's economic, social and political climate.

SOC WK 6601 Evid Bsd Approaches in Direct SW Practice: Cog & Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy Models: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: SOC WK 5100 and SOC WK 6160 or consent of instructor and graduate standing. This course examines theory and evidence based practices through use of the Cognitive Behavioral and Rational Emotive Behavioral therapy models. Students will utilize these theories to conduct hands on intervention practices of assessment, treatment planning, interventive strategies, and termination when working within a family or direct practice setting. Student-conducted interventions through the use of role-plays will be videotaped and viewed by the instructor and classmates at each stage of the therapeutic process. This course will include integration and application of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders through the psychotherapeutic process.

SOC WK 6602 Evid Bsd Approaches in Dir SWork Practice: Sol Focused Therapy Model: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: SOC WK 5100 and SOC WK 6160 or consent of instructor and graduate standing. This course examines theory and evidence based practices through use of the Solution Focus therapy model. Students will utilize this theory to conduct hands on intervention practices of assessment, treatment planning, interventive strategies, and termination when working within a family or direct practice setting. Student-conducted interventions through the use of role-plays will be videotaped and viewed by the instructor and classmates at each stage of the therapeutic process. This course will include integration and application of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders through the psychotherapeutic process.

SOC WK 6603 Evid Bsd Approaches in Dir SWork Practice: Play and Interactive Models: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: SOC WK 5100 and SOC WK 6160 or consent of instructor and graduate standing. This course examines theory and evidence based practices through use of the Play and Interactive therapy models. Students will utilize these theories to conduct hands on intervention practices of assessment, treatment planning, interventive strategies, and termination when working within a family or direct practice setting. Student-conducted interventions through the use of role-plays will be videotaped and viewed by the instructor and classmates at each stage of the therapeutic process. This course will include integration and application of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of MentalDisorders through the psychotherapeutic process.

SOC WK 6604 Introduction to Motivational Interviewing: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: SOC WK 5100 and SOC WK 6160, or consent of instructor, and graduate standing. This course focuses on skill development in Motivational Interviewing (MI), a specific style of interaction used to help clients/patients increase internal motivation to change behavior. The course will include theoretical underpinnings of MI, including a review of research establishing MI as an evidence-based intervention for a number of behavior areas. The course will also review a model of learning MI and provide specific opportunities for students to practice the skill. The broad objective of this course is to provide social work students an overview of Motivational Interviewing and its application to various domains of social work.

SOC WK 6630 Diagnosis And Related Pharmacology For Social Work Practice: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 5100 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course is designed for social work students, and will provide an overview of the development and treatment of selected mental health disorders classified by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. In particular, the course will examine, from a systems perspective, the psychological and neuropsychological etiologies of mood, psychotic, personality and other disorders and their preferred pharmacological treatment.

SOC WK 6640 School Social Work Practice in Public Schools: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 5100 or equivalent or graduate standing and consent of instructor. Examines the role of the social worker in school settings and includes work with youth, families, and communities in relation to the child or adolescent's functioning in school.

SOC WK 6645 Hospital Social Work: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 5100 and SOC WK 5500 or equivalent. This course focuses the key issues and practices of providing social work services through an interdisciplinary model in a large academic urban hospital setting. Practice issues will include discharge planning (housing, transportation, insurance and finances, medications and social/community supports) with focus on cultural competence and health literacy. The course will also review the following aspects of hospital social work: inpatient medicine, inpatient psychiatry, forensic social work, emergency department social work, transplant social work and clinic social work. Class discussions will integrate information concerning current health care economics.

SOC WK 6800 Graduate Field Practicum II: 2-6 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 5800 and SOC WK 5801. Provides integrative field experience in student's graduate social work practice concentration. May be taken for 2 to 6 hours credit depending on time in agency during semester, 55 contact hours = 1 credit hour. May be repeated once and/or taken concurrently with SOC WK 6850.

SOC WK 6850 Graduate Field Practicum III: 2-6 semester hours

Prerequisites: SOC WK 6800 Provides advanced integrative field experience in students' graduate social work practice concentration. May be taken for 2 to 6 hours of credit depending on time in agency during semester, 55 contact hours = 1 credit hour. May be repeated once and/or taken concurrently with SOC WK 6800.

SOC WK 6900 Directed Study In Professional Social Work: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. Independent graduate-level study on a topic of particular interest through readings, reports, and field work under faculty supervision.

Lois Pierce
Professor and Director
Ph.D., Washington University

Sharon Johnson
Professor
Ph.D., Washington University

Uma Segal
Professor
Ph.D., Washington University

Margaret Sherraden
Professor
Ph.D., Washington University

Baorong Guo
Associate Professor
Ph.D., Washington University

Thomas Meuser
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Missouri-St. Louis

Joseph Pickard
Associate Professor
Ph.D., Washington University

Shirley Porterfield
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin - Madison

Huei-Wern Shen
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., University of Michigan

Kristin Wagner
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., Washington University

Sha-Lai Williams
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., Washington University

Patricia Rosenthal
Clinical associate professor
M.S.W., Washington University

Lori Curtis
Associate Teaching Professor
M.S.W., Washington University

Linda Wells-Glover
Associate Teaching Professor
M.S.W, Washington University

Courtney McDermott
Lecturer
M.S.W, Saint Louis University

Diane O'Brien
Lecturer
M.S.W., Washington University

Linda Vawter
Lecturer
M.S.W., Washington University

Norman Flax
Associate Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., Saint Louis University

Joan Hashimi
Associate Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., Washington University

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