History

Courses

HIST 1000 Introductory Topics in History: 3 semester hours

This course covers various special topics in history to be determined by the field, availability of instructors and interest of students. The course may be repeated for credit with the consent of the instructor.

HIST 1001 American Civilization to 1865 (MOTR HIST 101): 3 semester hours

This course considers the development of the Americas and the United States from the pre-Columbian era to the Civil War, with emphasis on the ideas and institutions that shaped U.S. Americans' experiences. Students will work with primary sources and additional materials to deepen understanding of the relationship between the U.S. and the world. Assignments further develop students' written communication skills. Course fulfills American History and Government General Education requirement.

HIST 1002 American Civilization 1865 to Present (MOTR HIST 102): 3 semester hours

This course examines the development of the modern United States from Reconstruction through the present. It considers the ideas, institutions, economic and social changes that shaped Americans' experiences. Students work with primary sources and additional materials to deepen understanding of the relationship between the U.S. and the world. The course further develops students' written communication skills. Course fulfills the American History and Government General Education requirement.

HIST 1003 African American History: 3 semester hours

This course will selectively survey the experiences of African Americans from the period of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade to the late twentieth century. Topics may include the development of the slave trade and the institutionalization of slavery, slave culture and resistance, the role of African Americans during the Civil War and Reconstruction period, the rise of segregation and the disfranchisement of African Americans, the Depression and WWII eras, and recent protest movements. Course fulfills American History and Government General Education Requirement.

HIST 1007 Introduction to African and African American Studies: 3 semester hours

This course draws from history, literature, sociology, art, and economics to survey the impact of African migrations on the Americas. It highlights the movements, conditions, and experiences that have shaped the development of African American history, culture, and society. Course fulfills American History and Government General Education Requirement.

HIST 1010 U.S. Business History: 3 semester hours

This course explores key developments in the business and economic history of America from the founding to the present. It offers foundational knowledge of the history of American business, connecting it to key issues in American history.

HIST 1030 Ancient Greece and the Roman Empire: 3 semester hours

This course surveys the history of ancient Greece and Rome in the context of the larger Mediterranean world. Topics may include politics and economy, war and society, and culture. The chronological span is from the establishment of the Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations (2000-1500 BCE) to the fall of the Western Roman Empire in the fifth century CE.

HIST 1031 From the Middle Ages to the Age of Revolutions (MOTR WCIV 101): 3 semester hours

This course covers the development of western European societies and traditions from the fall of the Western Roman Empire in the fifth century CE, through the Middle Ages to the Renaissance, and the Enlightenment to the end of the French Revolution in 1799. Themes may include politics and economy, war and society, and culture.

HIST 1032 Topics in European Civilization: 1715 to the Present (MOTR WCIV 102): 3 semester hours

This course covers the development of western European societies and traditions from 1715 to the present. Themes may include politics and economy, war and society, and culture.

HIST 1034 Introduction to Ancient Egypt and Its Civilization: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 1034. This course will survey ancient Egyptian history and culture from predynastic times to Greco-Roman rule, roughly 3000 BCE to 30 BCE. Students will discuss archaeological sites, mummification, religion, architecture, texts, and more. Through comparing ancient Egyptian culture with our own, students will explore what has changed in the world and what has endured for millennia.

HIST 1037 The Wonders of Greece: Introduction to Greek History and Culture: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 1037. Our democracy and culture have been heavily influenced by Greek civilization. This course will introduce students to the culture and civilization of Greece in order to provide a better understanding of our own society. The course will cover the political and military history, art, literature, philosophy, and science of Greece from prehistoric to modern times, with special emphasis on Greek civilization's enduring democratic and cultural ideals. The course will include screening of films and use of online resources.

HIST 1041 East Asian Civilization: 3 semester hours

The development of Asian civilization from earliest times to the Manchu conquest.

HIST 1043 Topics in East Asian History and Culture: 3 semester hours

This course introduces students to historical and cultural issues in different areas of East Asia, especially Japan, Korea, and China. Topics may include a survey of history, as well as more specialized areas of politics, culture, literature, art, gender or more contemporary issues. The regional emphasis is determined by the instructor. It may be taken more than once, provided the course topic is different.

HIST 1062 Modern Africa: From Colonies to Nations: 3 semester hours

This course uses film, fiction, music, and historical sources to explore the history of twentieth century Africa, focusing on African experiences of the colonial and postcolonial periods.

HIST 1075 World History to 1500: 3 semester hours

A survey of the history of humankind to 1500 including the beginnings of civilization Mesopotamia, Africa, Asia and the Americas, the rise of Classical civilizations and the development of major transnational social, economic, political and religious networks.

HIST 1076 World History Since 1500: 3 semester hours

A survey of the history of humankind since 1500, emphasizing the growing interdependency of regional economic, political, and social systems. Topics will include imperialism, industrialization, and globalization.

HIST 1111 Reacting to the Past: 4 semester hours

Reacting to the Past is a series of historical simulations built around key moments and texts from the past. In each simulation, students are assigned a role and develop that character. The course offers students a rigorous academic experience in which they conduct historical research, speak, and write extensively. Because this course requires extensive writing, it fulfills the requirement for Freshman Composition.

HIST 1901 Capitalism in American History: 3 semester hours

Same as POL SCI 1901. This course offers students the opportunity to approach America's political economy with tools different from those offered by more quantitative economic constructs. Students will analyze market processes through a three dimensional approach that focuses not just on market competition but also on relationships of command-the exercise of power in firms, among nations, and between social groups-and on processes of historical change from the late colonial era through the twentieth century.

HIST 1999 Big History: From the Big Bang to the Present: 3 semester hours

Same as INTDSC 1999. An introduction to the humanities, social science, and science disciplines through a sweeping overview of natural and human history from the Big Bang to the present. Course will include lectures from faculty in various Arts and Sciences units, films, and group discussions.

HIST 2000 Selected Topics in History: 3 semester hours

This course covers various special topics in history to be determined by the field, availability of instructors and interest of students. The course may be repeated for credit with the consent of the instructor.

HIST 2002 Introduction to Latinx Studies: 3 semester hours

This course introduces the experiences and conditions of U.S. Latinx of Caribbean, Latin American, and, especially, Mexican descent. Students will examine how people from Hispanic- and Indo-America are both incorporated into American culture, history, and occupational life and often marginalized as either outsiders or foreigners. The course studies how historical forces push and pull people from Latin America to the United States, where they create new U.S. ethnic, racial and local identities. Using films, novels/memoirs, music, and art as windows, students will identify patterns of identity formation, ethnic culture, community politics, labor struggles, and social mobility, and will map the heterogeneous mosaic of Latin American and Caribbean migrations and communities.

HIST 2004 The Civil War Era: Slavery, Emancipation, and the Greater Reconstruction: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. This course examines one of the most significant experiences in U.S. history across three chronological units: American slavery and debates over it; historical explanations for U.S. slavery's demise; and the broader meaning and legacies of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Students pay particular attention to Civil War St. Louis. This is a hands-on course with field trips and community engagement. Course fulfills the American History and Government General Education Requirement.

HIST 2005 Becoming Modern America: From the Gilded Age to the Great Depression: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing or consent of the instructor. This course explores the economic, political, cultural, and social transformations of the emerging industrial United States from 1877 through the Great Depression of the 1930s. Students will use historical sources, such as memoirs, film, images, newspapers, literature, and historians' accounts to consider how the United States changed during these crucial decades. This course fulfills the American History and Government General Education requirement.

HIST 2008 History of St. Louis: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or the consent of the instructor. This course will provide an overview of the history of the St. Louis metropolitan region. Topics may include the St. Louis region before the Europeans, forces leading to the founding of the city, St. Louis as an "urban frontier," the Age of Steam on water and rail, the questions of slavery and the Civil War, St. Louis in the Gilded Age, the World's Fair, early efforts at city planning, impact of the automobile, St. Louis during the Depression and World War II, post-war suburbanization, urban renewal, and 21st century prospects. This is an experiential course requiring field trips and community engagement.

HIST 2017 African American History: From Civil Rights to Black Power: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. This seminar focuses on the activities, ideas, movement centers, and personalities that created the Civil Rights and Black Power movements in the U.S. from the 1950s through the 1970s. Some familiarity with the broad contours of U.S. History is presupposed. Special attention will be devoted to the roles of the African American masses, college students, and women, and to the points of conflict, cooperation, and intersection between African America and the larger American society.

HIST 2020 Women and Social Movements in U.S. History: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 2020. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. This course explores the role of women in social movements that transformed the United States during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It asks broad questions about how ideas, experiences, and laws regarding gender and sexuality have shaped ordinary people's lives, as well as U.S. institutions, and have been touchstones for social change movements. It considers abolitionism, suffrage, progressive reforms, labor, civil rights, and second wave feminism, among other movements.

HIST 2021 War and Violence in Modern Times: 3 semester hours

Same as MVS 2021. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. This course examines the connections between warfare and resistance, gangs and poverty, and state and non-state officials as enactors of violence. It explores the effects of war and violence on the poor in Brazil and the United States, prisoners of war in Asia, and resistance fighters in Latin America and northern Africa. Students will watch films/short videos, read academic and newspaper articles, and listen to short podcasts to grapple with the issues underlying structures of violence.

HIST 2025 U.S. Foreign Relations and Military History: 3 semester hours

Same as MVS 2025. This course surveys the development of American land, sea, air, space, and cyber power from the start of the colonial era to the present, with an emphasis on the interrelationship between U.S. foreign and military policies and between diplomacy and force.

HIST 2026 Baseball and the Making of Modern America: 3 semester hours

This course uses the lens of baseball to aid in the development of a deeper understanding of the United States. It explores how social, cultural, economic, and political forces shaping the U.S. after the Civil War were reflected in the national past time. In the study of key trends and events in baseball history, students will learn how broader themes in U.S. history, such as industrialization and urbanization, race and ethnicity, imperialism, war, gender, and business impacted and were influenced by the sport.

HIST 2028 Sex, Drugs, and Rock 'n Roll: The 1960s in Song, Fashion, Dating, and Protest: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. This course examines the turbulent 1960s and the period's identification with sex, drugs, and rock 'n roll by looking historically at drugs, music, and changes in gender roles. It uses these histories to explore the cultural and political movements of the 1960s (1955 through 1973)-civil rights, black power, new left, antiwar, and feminist movements-along with the emergence of the counterculture, hallucinogenic drugs, the sexual revolution, and the whole hip scene. The class is discussion-based. There is a mid-term exam and several assignments, including a class presentation and papers on readings, music, and movies.

HIST 2030 U.S. Immigration: 1790 to the 21st Century: 3 semester hours

This course examines the history of free and forced newcomers to the U.S. and the laws that shaped their ability to immigrate. It looks at the conditions that newcomers faced and their subsequent struggles for political, social, and economic rights and freedoms. It explores the legal foundations that grounded the admission of certain newcomers and the exclusion or marginalization of others.

HIST 2050 Introduction to Public History: 3 semester hours

This course introduces students to the foundations, theory, and practice of public history, which is the study of whose history is preserved, remembered, and celebrated in American society. It explores how everyday people engage with history, the diverse venues in which history is presented and produced, and the efforts public historians must make in order to respectfully represent the histories of underrepresented groups. Students will acquire a knowledge about the practices of public history and its professional opportunities, as well as the challenges faced by public historians today.

HIST 2066 Women and Gender in African History: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 2066. Using documentaries, popular culture, graphic histories, and more conventional sources, this course explores the history of Africa, highlighting African women's lives, experiences, and agency, and questioning the application of Western concepts of gender to an African setting.

HIST 2067 African History through Fiction and Film: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. This course will examine modern African history with literature and film, focusing on works that have poignantly captured important events in African history such as slavery, colonialism, and independence.

HIST 2068 Aiding Africa: 3 semester hours

This course examines the history of economic development on the African continent. Students will learn about the local and the international encounters that development has fostered; they will explore how Africans have experienced and reformulated development in different contexts and time periods; and they will study the changing international policies on development, which have deeply shaped the lives of Africans. This course satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.

HIST 2082 Christianity: From Jesus to Martin Luther: 3 semester hours

This course orients students in the scholarship about the Christian Church in the Western tradition as an institution. Open discussion is encouraged, and all traditions will be respected in the interest of expanding our knowledge of the past as well as communities today.

HIST 2083 Europe in Early Middle Ages: Paganism to Christianity: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. The end of the Roman Empire as a universal entity; the successor states of the Mediterranean and Northern Europe; the emergence of a Western Christendom under the Franks; the development of feudal states; the Gregorian reforms; the Crusades; the revival of education and learning in the twelfth century.

HIST 2084 Crusades and Plagues: Europe in the High and Late Middle Ages: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Medieval society at its political, economic, and intellectual zenith; the crisis of the later Middle Ages; the Papal schism and the development of national particular churches within Catholicism; and the rise of estate institutions.

HIST 2085 Medieval England: From Arthur to Richard III: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. A brief summary of the Anglo-Saxon heritage and the impact of the Norman Conquest, followed by an investigation of the institutional, social, and legal evolution of the realm of England. English development will be viewed in its European context.

HIST 2100 Careers with a History Degree: 1 semester hour

This course is an orientation to career opportunities for history majors. It is recommended for majors and minors and is open to students who are considering the field. It explores careers directly related to history and other sectors for which the degree is valuable, including business, law, education, communication and more. Students engage in activities that help them to identify their professional goals, network in the region, and become familiar with internships, minors, and certificates that enhance their degree.

HIST 2102 Introduction to Gender Studies: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 2102, SOC WK 2102, POL SCI 2102, and SOC 2102. This core class is required for all Gender Studies Certificate earners. This class introduces students to cultural, political and historical issues that shape gender. Through a variety of disciplinary perspectives in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, the course familiarizes students with diverse female and male experiences and gendered power relationships.

HIST 2112 Democracy, Freedom, and Equality: Historical Role Playing Games: 3 semester hours

This course uses historical game simulations built around key moments and texts from the past that explore issues of democracy, freedom, and equality in the U.S. In each simulation, students are assigned a role and develop their character for game sessions. The course offers students a rigorous academic experience in which they conduct historical research, work collaboratively, speak, and write extensively. It can be repeated with different historical topics and games.

HIST 2117 Greek History and Culture: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 2117. Greek civilization has had a deep impact on contemporary society in art; social, political, and economic organization; philosophy; law; medicine; and science. This course covers major aspects of Greek history and culture from antiquity to the present. It considers the major political and military events of Greek History, as well as important aspects of Greek culture, including sports and the history of the Olympic Games, literature, philosophy, and mythology.

HIST 2120 Global Girl Cultures: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 2101. This course explores themes of identity and gender construction, media representation, and cultural production found in a spectrum of historic and modern international and US girl cultures. 1950s British Teddy Girls, 1970s Japanese Takanokozoku, 1990s American Riot Grrrls, 2000s Mexican American Cholas, and other girl cultures teach us about the many strategies teens and young women use to construct their own forms of identity through music, language, zines, fashion, and other diverse activities. This course satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.

HIST 2160 Introduction to American Studies: 3 semester hours

Same as ENGL 2160. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. This course introduces students to the multidisciplinary nature of American Studies and is a required course for those who wish to complete the minor in American Studies. It reviews the discipline from its origins in the 1930s, and it introduces students to St Louis' rich resources for American Studies.

HIST 2185 Introduction to Religious Studies: 3 semester hours

Same as PHIL 2185. This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary study of religion. With an emphasis on research methods and perennial philosophical and historical topics, students will develop tools for investigating the various dimensions of worldview and gain exposure to many different religious traditions.

HIST 2420 Maiko, Maids, and Masako: Women in Japanese Cultural History: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 2420. This course offers perspectives on famous Japanese women who have captured the public eye at various historical junctures. Students will learn to critically assess representations of these mythological, religious, occupational, and subcultural figures, as well as their linkage to notions of nationhood and modernity. This course satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

HIST 2425 Food and Drink in Japan: A Cultural History: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 2425. This course explores food and drink as core aspects of intimate and public life in Japan and as key elements of nationalism. It examines distinct class, ethnic, and regional dimensions of food and drink that have their own unique histories. Students will learn how food and drink encode a spectrum of historical meanings as well as great cultural hybridity. This course satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.

HIST 2430 Ghosts, Goblins, and Godzillas: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 2430. This course explores the spirits, ghouls, and animal tricksters who populate the historic and modern Japanese imagination. Students will learn about the supernatural beings, and the exceptional humans who interact with or control them, who are found in centuries of Japanese religion, folklore, literature, and art, and are also frequent themes in modern art, film, anime and manga. This course satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.

HIST 2800 History of American Economic Development: 3 semester hours

Same as ECON 2800. Prerequisites: ECON 1000 or ECON 1001 or consent of instructor. Uses economic concepts to explain historical developments in the American economy, beginning with the hunter gatherers who crossed the Bering land bridge around 12,000 BC. Main topics include the Native American economies, European exploration and conquest, the colonial economies, indentured servitude, the American Revolution, the US Constitution, westward expansion, transportation, the Industrial Revolution, state banking and free banking, slavery, the Civil War, post-bellum agriculture, the rise of big business and antitrust, banking panics, the Federal Reserve Act, the First and Second World Wars, the New Deal, and the growth of government in postwar economy.

HIST 3000 Special Topics in History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. This course covers various special topics in history to be determined by the field, availability of instructors and interest of students. The course may be repeated for credit with the consent of the instructor.

HIST 3032 Modern China: From the Decline of the Qing Empire to the Global Age: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Junior Standing or consent of instructor. The economic, social, and political development of modern China.

HIST 3035 Gender and Sexuality in Modern U.S. History: 3 semester hours

This course will examine how gender has been historically constructed in the United States during the 20th and 21st centuries. It considers how women and men have understood their place in society, what social and cultural forces informed their understandings, and how these concepts changed over time. Students will critically engage with the categories of gender and sexuality as historical and cultural productions within the context of 20th century US politics, culture, and social movements.

HIST 3043 History of Crime and Justice: 3 semester hours

Same as CRIMIN 3043. Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor. The analysis, development, and change in philosophies and responses to crime. Emphasis on major forms and definitions of crime, the emergence of modern policing, the birth of the prison, and the juvenile court system.

HIST 3065 From Ivory to Oil: Mining and Extraction in African History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. This course focuses on mining and its effects on economic and human development in twentieth century Africa. It examines specific case studies, which may include oil, diamonds, uranium, copper, and ivory to understand how African states and economies have been affected by valuable resources.

HIST 3092 War and Upheaval in Europe, 1900-1950: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of the instructor. This course is a social, political, economic, and cultural survey of Europe during the eras of two world wars. Topics may include the "Belle Epoque," the cataclysm of World War I, peace treaties, the rise of communism and fascist states, the Great Depression and collapse of democracy, World War II, the Holocaust, and the efforts at a postwar settlement.

HIST 3093 Europe in Peace and Prosperity, 1950-Present: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor. This course surveys the main social, economic, political, military, and cultural trends in Europe from the end of World War II. Topics may include the postwar settlement, the development of the social welfare state, the establishment, development, and collapse of communism, and the various phases of the European Union.

HIST 3199 Introduction to Historical Inquiry: 4 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 (may be taken concurrently). This course is designed to develop historical thinking and research skills. Students will read historical sources, exploring the rhetoric of history, identifying perspectives in historical sources, and the process of formulating historical questions, and building research plans. Other topics covered may include proper citation procedures and historiography. The course is writing intensive and will involve primary source research at libraries and archives.

HIST 3214 Writing Systems of the World: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 3214. This course studies the writing systems from around the world leads to appreciation for one of humankind's most important technological inventions. Students will explore the origins and development of writing systems over time, the linguistic classification of writing, and the transmission of writing across languages and cultures. This course satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.

HIST 3218 Visual and Material Culture of Japan: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 3218. This course offers students the opportunity to research Japanese visual genres and material artifacts, from the iconography of Buddhism and fifteenth century pottery to postwar political cartoons, advertising posters, and etiquette comics. Students will discover how artifacts and images provide a means for communicating cultural meaning, while also reflecting aesthetics, humor, and cultural norms. This course satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.

HIST 3999 Internship: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of supervising instructor and institution offering the internship. This supervised practicum in a museum, historical agency, or other institution offers an opportunity for hands-on experience in public history. Contact the History Department undergraduate advisor for information on arranging an internship.

HIST 4001 Special Readings: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Independent study through readings, reports and conferences.

HIST 4002 Collaborative Research: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Faculty-student collaboration on a research project designed to lead toward the publication of a jointly-authored article. The faculty member will direct the research.

HIST 4014 World History for the Secondary Classroom: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: TCH ED 3310 or consent of the instructor. This course is required for Social Studies certification. It adapts the themes and subject matter of World History to the secondary classroom and trains teachers in techniques particularly designed to maximize the use of primary sources, foster critical inquiry, and encourage knowledge of subject matter. This course cannot be counted towards the minimum 33-hour history major requirement, but does count towards the 45 hour maximum and for Social Studies Certification.

HIST 4142 Inquiries in U.S. History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: HIST 2999. This course will develop historical thinking and writing skills through investigation in topics in National History.

HIST 4143 Inquiries in World History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: HIST 2999. This course will develop historical thinking and writing skills through investigation in topics in World History.

HIST 4999 Senior Seminar: 5 semester hours

Prerequisites: HIST 3199, presentation of three examples of formal written work submitted in prior upper-division courses in history, and consent of department. This course studies in historical methodology and historiography. Directed readings, research, and writing leading to the production of an original piece of historical scholarship. An exit interview is required. This course is required for majors seeking Degree with Distinction. It may not be taken for graduate credit.

HIST 5000 Advanced Selected Topics in History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Special topics in history. The course may be repeated for credit with consent of the instructor.

HIST 5142 Advanced Inquiries in U.S. History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course will develop historical thinking and writing skills through investigation in topics in United States history.

HIST 5143 Advanced Inquiries in World History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course will develop historical thinking and writing skills through investigation in topics in World history.

HIST 5592 The History of the Visual Arts in American Museums: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 5592 and ART HS 5592. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. This course is an introduction to selected topics in the history of museology, focusing on art and anthropology museums as sites for the interpretations of art and culture, and as contested meeting grounds for various views of history and culture.

HIST 6000 The Historian's Craft: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. This course will introduce incoming students to graduate work, both in the field of history generally and to the M.A. program at UM-St. Louis in particular. It will familiarize them with the fields of historical study and the UMSL faculty who teach them, protocols of the profession, and methodologies of historical research, writing, and analysis. It will also help students learn about and prepare for careers outside the academy and/or Ph.D. programs in the field. Students may be required to attend colloquia off campus.

HIST 6001 Introduction to Public History and Cultural Heritage: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. This seminar will introduce students to the theory and practice of public history and cultural heritage. Readings will acquaint students with these fields of study and offer commentary on a variety of strategies for making the past relevant for contemporary audiences.

HIST 6002 Material Culture in Historical Context: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. This course will present various theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of material culture. It will explore how the interpretation of objects has contributed to the understanding (or misunderstanding) of past and present cultures. The course will also examine contemporary museum practice in the display of material culture. Students will be expected to make on-site observations at different types of local museums, and will conduct research into a category of material culture that appeals to their individual interests.

HIST 6003 Economics of Museums and Heritage: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor. This course introduces students to the financial history of museums and heritage, explores debates about economic strategies for museums and heritage, and empowers museum professionals to work effectively with the chief financial/administrative officer of their museum or heritage site. Topics include: government policies toward museums and heritage, the economics of blockbuster exhibitions, debates concerning collections as an economic resource for museums and cities, daily financial management, best practices for using financial resources to achieve institutional mission and priorities, long-term strategic planning, the history and development of public-private partnerships, cultural philanthropy and donations.

HIST 6004 Writing for Museums: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of Museum Studies program director. This course will develop skills for professionals working in museum settings who need to communicate effectively with multiple audiences through various platforms. Topics will include writing for proposals, object descriptions, interpretive texts, and digital storytelling.

HIST 6014 World History for the Secondary School Classroom: 3-6 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. The intent of this course is to adapt the themes and subject matter of World history to the secondary classroom and to train teachers in the methodology of the Socratic symposium, techniques designed to maximize the use of sources, foster critical inquiry, and encourage knowledge of subject matter. Particular emphasis will be placed on defining the broad and connecting themes of World history, on expanding bibliography, and on methods for choosing primary sources for use in an interactive classroom.

HIST 6115 Historical Thinking in Research and Practice: 3 semester hours

Same as TCH ED 6115. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing or consent of instructor. In this hands-on course, students examine current research and effective teaching strategies that facilitate historical thinking while also broadening content knowledge. Students further design, implement, and assess educational materials and practices that foster historical thinking, reading, and writing.

HIST 6116 Historical Thinking in Theory and Practice II: 3 semester hours

Same as TCH ED 6116. Prerequisites: HIST 6115 / TCH ED 6115 or consent of instructor. Building upon HIST 6115 / TCH ED 6115, this course emphasizes the design, implementation, and assessment of teaching materials and practices that foster historical thinking and reading. In this hands-on, action research course, students will focus on their own teaching materials and practices to improve their capacity to teach and assess students' historical thinking.

HIST 6121 Directed Readings: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of a member of the Doctoral Faculty. Directed research at the graduate level.

HIST 6122 Collaborative Research: 3-6 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and consent of instructor. Faculty-student collaboration on a research project designed to lead toward the publication of a jointly-authored article. The faculty member will direct the research.

HIST 6123 Thesis Seminar: 1-6 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. Thesis research and writing on a selected topic in history.

HIST 6124 Graduate Internship: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of supervising instructor and institution offering the internship. Supervised practicum in a museum, historical agency, and other instituion offering an opportunity for hands-on experience in public history.

HIST 6125 Practicum in Public History and Cultural Heritage: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. In collaboration with a designated community partner, students will research and interpret the past for contemporary audiences. The course will combine traditional classroom sessions with hands-on training.

HIST 6126 Museum Studies Internship: 1-4 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. Professionally-supervised work experience in a museum setting. Requires a minimum of 50 hours of on-site attendance per credit hour and submission of a final paper.

HIST 6127 Museums and Communities: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of the Director of Museum Studies. As museums and heritage institutions have sought to attract new audiences, they have tried to re-present their collections with new stories, address topics of concern to the denizens of their cities, and provide a broader range of programming than ever before. This course considers how to identify community characteristics and needs, create entry points for multiple audiences at museums, and build strong, long-term relationships with local partners. We consider difficult histories, conflict, and strategies to create space for diverse perspectives; the role of communications technologies in soliciting participation and promoting dialogue; and networks and the organizational skills for community development. Students will examine case studies of community-based museum programming, and develop an engagement strategy around an exhibit.

HIST 6129 Emerging Museum Practices: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate students in Museum Studies or Public History or consent of the Director of Museum Studies. This course examines emerging trends and models in the museum field. The museum's educational role in society is quickly changing. Learning is not only more collaborative but also more accessible beyond the walls of the museum. Through readings, activities, and exercises, students will explore the mechanics of partnerships with cultural organizations, creative individuals, and the local community, while considering how museums should function in society today. We will examine interdisciplinary programming via collaboration with the creative class; creating social/participatory experiences; making collections personally relevant to audiences; and engaging in the sharing city. We pay particular attention to the museum's responsibility to civic duty and sustainable practices.

HIST 6131 Museum Origins and Evolution: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of Director of Museum Studies Program. This course traces the social and cultural history of museums from their origins in curiosity cabinets, princely collections, freak shows, and exhibitions, through their late 19th and early 20th century institutionalization, to present-day developments such as blockbuster exhibitions, community collaborations, masterpiece architecture, and the spread of museal and heritage institutions around the globe. Topics include colonialism, modernity, and the production of taxonomical knowledge; museums and nationalism; theories of culture, patrimony, and ownership; manufacture, marketing, and museums; the relationships between museums and academia; identity politics and culture wars; community-based initiatives; and virtual and digital museum spaces.

HIST 6132 Digital Video for Museums and Community History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of Director of Museum Studies Program. This course covers basic production and post-production in digital video, and examines how digital video has been and can be used for community history projects and museum installations. Students will learn basics of shooting, lighting, sound, scripting, and non-linear editing; interviewing and observational footage; and produce a series of documentary shorts. Readings will include the special characteristics of the cinematic medium and case studies of digital video for community-based research, advocacy, and museum audiences.

HIST 6133 Museums and History in the Digital Age: 3 semester hours

This course introduces and explores the key issues, analyses, critical debates, opportunities and potential drawbacks for museums and public historians using digital media to engage with communities. Students will gain facility in implementing digital strategies for museum and public history initiatives, including how to plan, manage, and assess the success of media projects.

HIST 6134 History Curatorship: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. Principles and practices of curatorship, with a focus on historical collections. Curatorial responsibilities for object care. Role of curator in exhibit research, design, and implementation. Issues of inclusivity and shared authority. Historical shifts in curatorial practice, collecting, and museum missions.

HIST 6138 Museum Studies Master's Project: 5 semester hours

Same as ART HS 6038 and ANTHRO 6138. Prerequisites: Consent of Director of Museum Studies Program. Research and writing/exhibit development on a selected topic.

HIST 6139 Practicum in Exhibit and Program Development: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and graduate standing. Development of exhibits and related education programs. Students work as teams with museum professionals to develop and implement an exhibit concept that integrates design, education, and marketing from the onset. Methods in planning, flow charting, budgeting, team dynamics and related skills.

HIST 6142 Readings in U.S. History: 3-5 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. Directed readings and writing in selected topics and areas in United States History.

HIST 6143 Readings in World History: 3-5 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. Directed readings and writing on selected topics and areas in World History.

HIST 6145 Topics in Environmental History: 3-5 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the interactions people have had with the land and sea, the biophysical environment, over time. Satisfies the elective requirement outside the Biology Department for the Tropical Biology and Conservation Graduate Certificate Program. May be repeated provided the topic is different.

HIST 6152 Directed Readings in U.S. History: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of a member of the graduate faculty. Directed readings and research at the graduate level.

HIST 6153 Directed Readings in World History: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of a member of the graduate faculty. Directed readings and research at the graduate level.

Laura M. Westhoff
Professor and Chair
Ph.D, Washington University

Laura Miller
Eiichi Shibusawa-Seigo Arai Endowed Professor of Japanese Studies and Professor of History
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles

Lara Kelland
Des Lee Endowed Professor in Museum Studies and Community History
Ph.D. , University of Illinois-Chicago

Kevin J. Fernlund
Professor
Ph.D., University of New Mexico

Andrew J. Hurley
Professor
Ph.D., Northwestern University
Certificate in Public History and Cultural Heritage

Minsoo Kang
Professor
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles

Deborah Cohen
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Chicago

Priscilla Dowden-White
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Indiana-Bloomington

Kara Moskowitz
Associate Professor
Ph.D., Emory University

Peter Acsay
Teaching Professor
Ph.D., Saint Louis University

John Hoover
Adjunct Professor and Direcor, St. Louis Mercantile Library
M.A., University of Missouri-Columbia

Robert Bliss
Founders Professor
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison

Jay Rounds
Founders Professor
Ph.D., University of California-Los Angeles

Mark A. Burkholder
Curators' Professor Emeritus
Ph.D, Duke University

John R. Gillingham
Curators' Professor Emeritus
Ph.D, University of California, Berkeley

Richard H. Mitchell
Curators' Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin

Gerda W. Ray
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

Blanche M. Touhill
Professor Emeritus and Chancellor Emerita
Ph.D., St. Louis University

Jerry M. Cooper
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin

Paul Corby Finney
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., Harvard University

Louis Gerteis
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison

Steven C. Hause
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., Washington University

Charles P. Korr
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles

William S. Maltby
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., Duke University

Steven W. Rowan
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D. , Harvard

Carlos A. Schwantes
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., University of Michigan

J. Frederick Fausz
Associate Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., William and Mary

Winston Hsieh
Associate Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., Harvard University