The College of Education at the University of Missouri-St. Louis is comprised of two departments: the Department of Educator Preparation, Innovation, and Research (EPIR) and the Department of Education Sciences and Professional Programs (ESPP). Teacher educator and educational administrator preparation and certification occur in EPIR, whereas ESPP supports these efforts via educational foundations, psychological development, educational technology, and research methods and evaluation courses and offers assorted undergraduate and professional graduate degrees that include the Bachelor of Educational Studies degree, four Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs-accredited (CACREP) Counseling programs, and a National Association of School Psychologists-approved (NASP) School Psychology Program.

The following degrees and programs are available through the Department of Education Sciences and Professional Programs:

Bachelor of Educational Studies

Master of Education:

  • Adult & Higher Education with an emphasis in
    • Higher Education
  • Clinical Mental Health Counseling (CACREP-accredited)
  • Educational Psychology with an emphasis in
    • Character and Citizenship Education
    • Educational Research and Program Evaluation
  • Elementary School Counseling (CACREP-accredited)
  • Secondary School Counseling (CACREP-accredited)

Educational Specialist:

  • School Psychology (NASP-approved)

Doctor of Education

  • Assorted Learning Communities

Doctor of Philosophy in Education with an Emphasis in:

  • Counseling (CACREP accredited)
  • Educational Psychology

Graduate Certificate and Certification Programs:

  • Character and Citizenship Education
  • Community College Leadership
  • Program Evaluation in Education
  • Social Justice in Education
  • Student Affairs Administration & Leadership

Bachelor of Educational Studies (BES)

The Bachelor of Educational Studies (BES) is perfect for students excited about education, but looking for challenges outside the traditional classroom. The BES will prepare you for a career as an educator in many agencies.  Many institutions emphasize informal learning and many different settings. Employers at these institutions are eager to hire people who have training and relevant experience in education, management, marketing, and technology. This degree is designed to be a creative, flexible, and inter-disciplinary bachelor’s degree that emphasizes practical skills in multiple settings.

Bachelor of Educational Studies

The B. E. S. is a  professional degree designed for individuals who wish to study Education as a  scholarly discipline in preparation for a career in one of four areas:

(1) Early Childhood Education

(2) Exercise Science  

(3) Park and Museum Programs (pending CBHE approval)

(4) Youth and Adult Development (pending CBHE approval)

Students follow the University's General Education Requirements, Mathematical Skills, Advanced Expository Writing, American History and Government, and Cultural Diversity Requirements. Due to prerequisites of required courses all students must take PSYCH 1003 and POL SCI 1100. Students pursuing the Exercise Science emphasis area must take BIOL 1012, BIOL 1013, and MATH 1030.

Foundations (Required Courses)

EDUC 1001Early Clinical Experience: Community Agency1
TCH ED 2000Becoming a Professional Educator1
EDUC 2222Interpretation: Connecting Audiences and Meaning3
EDUC/PHY ED 2136Facilities Management3
EDUC 3170Grant Proposal Writing for Educators3
ED FND 3251Black Americans In Education3
ED FND 4330History of American Education through the Lens of Social Justice3
ED PSY 2212Child and Adolescent Development3
or PSYCH 2272 Developmental Psychology: Adulthood And Aging
ED REM 4730Program Assessment and Evaluation3
ED TECH 4302Educational Technology Instruction in Educational Agencies3
or ED TECH 4436 Computer-Mediated Teaching and Learning in Education
MKTG 3721Introduction to Digital Marketing Strategies3
THEATR 3362Storytelling3
Total Hours32

Early Childhood Education Specialty Courses

Required Courses
ECH ED 3302Introduction to Inclusive Early Childhood Education3
ECH ED 3303Curriculum And Practice Laboratory: Infant/Toddler1
ECH ED 3304Curriculum And Practice Laboratory: Preschool1
ECH ED 3313Curriculum And Practice: Infant/Toddler2
ECH ED 3314Curriculum And Practice: Preschool Education2
ECH ED 3332Literacy, Learning and Instruction For The Young Child3
ECH ED 3350Family and Professional Partnerships within School/Community3
ECH ED 4317Implementation, Evaluation, and Assessment in Early Childhood Education3
SPEC ED 3318Inclusive Classrooms3
Total Hours21
Clinical Experiences
EDUC 4989Internship I3
EDUC 4990Internship II6
EDUC 4991Internship III6
Suggested Courses
MEDIA ST 2211Introduction To Digital Multimedia Production3
MEDIA ST 2222Convergence and Digital Media3
MGMT 3600Management And Organizational Behavior3
or SOC 3600 Management and Organizational Behavior
SOC WK 2000Social Work And Social Issues3
HLTH PE 3380Introduction to Nutrition for Health and Performance 3
Total Hours15

Exercise Science Specialty Courses

Required Courses
PHY ED 1124Principles & Practice In 1St Aid & Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation1
HLTH PE 3280Human Anatomy And Physiology5
HLTH PE 3285Safety and Emergency Care for Health & Physical Education3
HLTH PE 3284Physiology Of Human Exercise3
HLTH PE 3380Introduction to Nutrition for Health and Performance 3
HLTH PE 3434Teaching of Health and Wellness4
PHY ED 2134Personal Physical Fitness3
PHY ED 3287Seminar In Exercise Science1-3
PHY ED 3283Kinesiology3
PHY ED 3330Designing Physical Activity Programs3
PHY ED 3931Adult Exercise Leadership3
Total Hours32-34
Clinical Eperiences
EDUC 4989Internship I3
EDUC 4990Internship II6
EDUC 4991Internship III6
Total Hours15
Suggested Courses
MEDIA ST 2211Introduction To Digital Multimedia Production3
MEDIA ST 2222Convergence and Digital Media3
GERON 4130Interviewing Older Adults And Life Review3
GERON 4445Aging, Chronic Illness & Disability3
MGMT/SOC 3600Management And Organizational Behavior3
Total Hours15

Park and Museum Programs Specialty Courses

Program Requirements

Students must complete the requirements for one Academic Minor chosen in consultation with the advisor. The minor and electives in a related area must total 21 hours.

Suggested Minors

Suggested Courses
MEDIA ST 2211Introduction To Digital Multimedia Production3
MEDIA ST 2222Convergence and Digital Media3
MGMT 3600Management And Organizational Behavior3
or SOC 3600 Management and Organizational Behavior
SOC WK 2000Social Work And Social Issues3
HLTH PE 3380Introduction to Nutrition for Health and Performance 3
Total Hours15

 Youth and Adult Development Specialty Courses

Program Requirements

Students must complete the requirements for one Academic Minor chosen in consultation with the advisor. The minor and electives in a related area must total 21 hours.

Suggested Minors

Suggested Courses
MEDIA ST 2211Introduction To Digital Multimedia Production3
MEDIA ST 2222Convergence and Digital Media3
MGMT/SOC 3600Management And Organizational Behavior3
SOC WK 2000Social Work And Social Issues3
HLTH PE 3380Introduction to Nutrition for Health and Performance 3
Total Hours15

Master of Education in Adult & Higher Education

The M.Ed. in Adult & Higher Education is intended for

  1. faculty and other educators who want to improve their adult teaching skills;
  2. persons who occupy and seek to advance into administrative or management positions in a variety of educational settings; and
  3. others who work with adults in a variety of agencies.

The degree program includes courses in foundations, curriculum and teaching (including distance learning), organization and administration, research, and electives so that students can create an emphasis area to fit their career goals. To help address student interests, special topic seminars are offered from time to time. An internship in the student’s emphasis area is a required exit experience. Students elect either the adult education or higher education emphasis area.

Admission Requirements

This degree program follows the policies of The College of Education and the Graduate School relating to admissions, academic standards, residency, transfer credit, time limitations, and thesis options (see Graduate Study in the Bulletin). The minimum number of hours required for the M.Ed. degree is 32 credit hours.

Education Requirements

Foundation Courses
Select a course focusing on the learner from the following:3
The Adult Learner
The College Student
Select a course in historical foundations from the following:3
History Of Adult Education
History And Philosophy Of American Higher Education
Select a course on the improvement of instruction from the following:3
Improvement Of Instruction In Adult Education
Curriculum In Higher Education
Teaching For Learning In The University
Select one of the following:3-6
Philosophical Foundations Of Adult Education
and Curriculum Theory And Development In Adult Education 1
Organization And Administration Of Higher Education
Adult and Higher Education Electives
Select a minimum of 12 hours from the following:12
Adult Learning And Development
Survey Of Adult Distance Education
Multicultural Issues In Adult Education
Assessment In The Adult Classroom
Developing Intercultural Competence
Survey Of Human Resource Development And Adult Education
Teaching In The Community College
Directed Readings In Adult Learning
Problems In Adult Education
Seminar In Adult Education Research
Comparative International Adult and Higher Education
Current Issues In Higher Education
Student Affairs Administration
Seminar
Financial Issues In Higher Education
Governance Of Higher Education
Legal Issues in Student Affairs
Ethics in Higher Education Administration
Policy Analysis Of Higher Education
The Community College
Administration Of Adult And Community Education
Programming In Community And Adult Education
Psychology Of Education
Selection And Utilization Of Educational Multimedia
Teaching & Learning With Technology: Graphical Representational Tools
Computer-Mediated Communication In Education
Distance Learning Via Networks And Telecommunications
Educational Multimedia Design
Instructional Video Production
Research Course(s)
Select 3-6 hours from the following:3-6
Classroom Measurement And Evaluation
ED REM 6709
Educational Research Methods and Design 2
Exit Requirement
Select one of the following taken during the last 9 semester hours of the program:3
Internship (3 credit hours)
Internship
Total Hours30-36

 

1

Both classes are required for Adult Ed program

2

Required for Higher Education

Admission

In addition to meeting the general admission requirements of the Graduate School, applicants to the M.Ed. must complete the Departmental application in addition to the application to Graduate School, have three completed references on file, must have an undergraduate GPA of 3.0, and must take CNS ED 6000, Personal and Professional Development in Counseling, in their first semester. Admissions will be conducted twice a year. The deadlines for application are May 1 for the fall semester and October 1 for the spring semester.

Since it is the objective of the counseling faculty to identify students with low potential for competent practice as early as possible and to initiate the necessary procedures for dealing with such students, faculty of the counseling program reserve the right to review students at any stage of their coursework. A U (Unsatisfactory) in any clinical course or any grade less than a B in any core counseling course(CNS ED 6000, Personal and Professional Development in Counseling; CNS ED 6010: Theories of Counseling; CNS ED 6270 School Counseling Practicum; CNS ED 6370, Clinical Mental Health Counseling Practicum I; CNS ED 6375: Clinical Mental Health Counseling Practicum II; CNS ED 6280 School Counseling Field Experience; or CNS ED 6380 Clinical Mental Health Counseling Field Experience) will automatically trigger a review process by the Counseling Review Board. The Counseling Review Board process, however initiated, may result in the termination of the student’s degree program or other required or recommended remedies to address deficiencies judged by the Counseling Review Board as related to the skills that are essential to the development of competent and ethical practices as a professional counselor.

Students admitted to the M.Ed. degree programs in counseling as “restricted graduate students” (see the “graduate study” rules in this Bulletin) must attain a 3.0 GPA for the first 12 hours of graduate course work at UMSL with no grade less than a B or an S (Satisfactory) in any clinical course. Restricted students must include the following courses in the first 12 hours of coursework: CNS ED 6000: Personal and Professional Development in Counseling; CNS ED 6010: Theories of Counseling; and (CNS ED 6270 School Counseling Practicum or CNS ED 6370: Clinical Mental Health Counseling Practicum, as appropriate). A student earning any grade less than a B in any of these courses or a U (Unsatisfactory) in any clinical course, but still maintaining a 3.0 GPA, will be allowed to repeat the course one time and must earn a grade of B or better or an S (Satisfactory) in any clinical course to be fully admitted.

Master of Education in School Counseling – Overview

Mission

The School Counseling Program of the Department of Education Sciences and Professional Programs prepares professional school counselors to serve the academic, career, and personal/social needs of culturally diverse students in the elementary, middle, and secondary schools. The Department strives to develop a culturally diverse student population and to draw students from local, regional, national, and international locations.

Purpose and Objectives

The M.Ed. in School Counseling program prepares school counselors for positions in public or private elementary, middle, or secondary schools. The program is designed to fulfill entry-level program standards of preparation. It also is intended to enable program graduates to obtain Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Certification in School Counseling.

Emphasized in the program is the use of developmental perspectives by school counseling and guidance practitioners as outlined by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), and the most innovative school counselor training standards as described by the professional literature. That is, guidance and counseling services are considered appropriate and necessary for all students in schools, not just those with problems or in crisis. Remedial and crisis intervention theories and strategies are covered in the cur­riculum; however, facilitation of "developmental" conditions needed for students' learning, re-learning, and effective coping are viewed as most important.

The objectives of the school counseling program are to prepare graduates who can conceptualize and organize a school-based program around the eight goals which characterize developmental guidance and counseling programs. The objectives of the program is are to prepare graduates who:

  1. understand school environments;
  2. understand self and others;
  3. understand students' attitudes and behaviors;
  4. understand students' decision-making and problem-solving skills;
  5. have effective interpersonal and communication skills;
  6. understand students' school success skills;
  7. understand students' career awareness and educational planning; and
  8. understand community pride and involvement.

Each of these objectives is further delineated by a set of general objectives, described through expected observable outcomes. While each of these objectives are applicable to all grade levels, particular attention is given to objectives related to developmental stages and tasks for appropriate age groups. Program graduates are expected to be competent in and be able to:

  1. provide individual counseling;
  2. provide small group counseling;
  3. present large group/classroom guidance;
  4. organize and manage peer facilitator programs;
  5. develop a series of counseling and guidance activities for dysfunctioning (i.e. target) students;
  6. provide leadership in organizing guidance experiences for all students within a school;
  7. lead parent education groups;
  8. consult individually and in groups with teachers, parents, and administrators;
  9. consult with child study teams; and
  10. demonstrate counselor effectiveness through accountability studies.

Master of Education: Emphasis in Elementary School Counseling

The courses listed below meet the coursework requirements for the M.Ed. degree, state certification as a school counselor, and licensing as a professional counselor:

Counselor Education
CNS ED 6000Personal and Professional Development in Counseling3
CNS ED 6010Theories of Counseling3
CNS ED 6020Ethical and Professional Issues in Counseling3
CNS ED 6030Foundations for Multicultural Counseling3
CNS ED 6040Group Procedures in Counseling3
CNS ED 6050Individual Inventory3
CNS ED 6200Foundations of School Guidance3
CNS ED 6270School Counseling Practicum3
CNS ED 6280School Counseling Field Experience6
CNS ED 6400Career Information and Development3
Psychological Foundations and Human Development
ED PSY 6210Life-Span: Individual and Family Development3
ED PSY 6532Psychoeducational Differences3
Educational Research and Evaluation Methods
ED REM 6710Educational Research Methods and Design3
Electives
Six credit hours from CNS ED or related courses, such as:6
Theories and Techniques of Counseling Children and Adolescents
Introduction to Systems Theory for Couples and Family Counseling
Comprehensive Exam (Capstone Experience) 1
Total Hours48
1

Please consult with the Department office for requirements and dates of this examination.

State Certification

Although not a degree requirement, a passing score on the relevant Praxis test or other examination required by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education is also required for state certification as a school counselor and must be achieved before the student can be recommended by the Counseling Program for such certification.  In addition, students who do not hold a state certification as a teacher must also take the following courses in addition to their M.Ed. in School Counseling program in order to be recommended by the Counseling Program as a school counselor. 

SPEC ED 6325Advanced Studies in Classroom & Behavior Management3
SPEC ED 6412Psychology of Exceptional Children3

Master of Education: Emphasis in Secondary School Counseling

The courses listed below meet the course work requirements for the M.Ed. degree, state certification, and licensing as a professional counselor:

Counselor Education
CNS ED 6000Personal and Professional Development in Counseling3
CNS ED 6010Theories of Counseling3
CNS ED 6020Ethical and Professional Issues in Counseling3
CNS ED 6030Foundations for Multicultural Counseling3
CNS ED 6040Group Procedures in Counseling3
CNS ED 6050Individual Inventory3
CNS ED 6200Foundations of School Guidance3
CNS ED 6270School Counseling Practicum3
CNS ED 6280School Counseling Field Experience6
CNS ED 6400Career Information and Development3
Psychological Foundations and Human Development
ED PSY 6210Life-Span: Individual and Family Development3
ED PSY 6532Psychoeducational Differences3
Educational Research and Evaluation Methods
ED REM 6710Educational Research Methods and Design3
Six credit hours from CNS ED or related courses6
Comprehensive Examination (Capstone Experience) 1
Total Hours48
1

 Please consult with the Department office for requirements and dates of this examination.

 State Certification

Although not a degree requirement, a passing score on the relevant Praxis test or other examination required by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education is also required for state certification as a school counselor and must be achieved before the student can be recommended by the Counseling Program for such certification.  In addition, students who do not hold a state certification as a teacher must also take the following courses in addition to their M.Ed. in School Counseling program in order to be recommended by the Counseling Program as a school counselor. 

SPEC ED 6325Advanced Studies in Classroom & Behavior Management3
SPEC ED 6412Psychology of Exceptional Children3

Master of Education in Clinical Mental Health Counseling – Overview

M. Ed. Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program Mission Statement
 

The Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program of the Department of Education Sciences and Professional Programs prepares professional counselors, including mental health, career, addictions, couples/family, and child and adolescent counselors, to serve the mental health needs of culturally diverse individuals, groups, couples, and families in need. The Department’s outreach extends to schools, colleges and universities, community based organizations, business and industry, as well as independent practice. The Department strives to develop a culturally diverse student population and to draw students from local, regional, national, and international locations.

Purpose and Objectives

 The M.Ed. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling program prepares clinical mental health counselors for positions in community colleges, universities, employment agencies, vocational rehabilitation agencies, probation and parole work, juvenile detention, alcoholism and drug abuse clinics, career planning and placement centers, community mental health agencies, family and children services, and various federally funded public service projects. Additionally, graduates are employed in career development, and business and industry positions, especially in training and personnel areas. Others have moved into roles calling for research and evaluation skills. The program is designed to fulfill entry-level program standards of preparation. It also is intended to enable program graduates to apply for the Missouri License for Professional Counselors.

The objectives of this program are to prepare graduates:

  1. to function effectively and ethically as professional counselors in the community, within a mental health setting;
  2. to be self-aware and sensitive to their clients as people who exist in the context of different cultures and races and people who are potentially at risk;
  3. to flexibly and skillfully construct and apply theory and techniques to fit unique and changing needs of clients both individually and in groups, within a community mental health setting;
  4. to be proficient with the understanding and human relations skills necessary to consult as part of a team effort, within a mental health setting;
  5. to help individuals meet developmental concerns and needs both individually and in a variety of developmental group programs, within a mental health setting;
  6. to be knowledgeable about career development and the use of appraisal instruments and test interpretation and their impact on individual planning;
  7. to be knowledgeable about research methods and research literature; and
  8. to value developing professional expertise as a lifelong process.

Master of Education: Emphasis in Clinical Mental Health Counseling

The clinical mental health counseling emphasis allows flexibility for developing programs appropriate to particular nonschool settings. Students must have their adviser's approval before taking other than required courses.

Core Curriculum (CNS ED)

The courses listed below meet the course work requirements for the M. Ed. Degree and the license to practice as a professional counselor:

CNS ED 6000Personal and Professional Development in Counseling3
CNS ED 6010Theories of Counseling3
CNS ED 6020Ethical and Professional Issues in Counseling3
CNS ED 6030Foundations for Multicultural Counseling3
CNS ED 6040Group Procedures in Counseling3
CNS ED 6050Individual Inventory3
CNS ED 6070Psychopathology & Diagnosis3
CNS ED 6300Foundations Of Clinical Mental Health Counseling3
CNS ED 6370Clinical Mental Health Counseling Practicum I3
CNS ED 6380Clinical Mental Health Counseling Field Experience6
CNS ED 6400Career Information and Development3
CNS ED 6500Introduction to Systems Theory for Couples and Family Counseling3
CNS ED 6700Introduction To Addictive Behaviors And Addiction Counseling3
One course from the advanced multicultural cognate which includes:3
Integrating Religion And Spirituality In Counseling
Counseling Women Toward Empowerment
Counseling African American Clients
Counseling Sexual Minorities
Social Class and Poverty Issues In Counseling
Human Sexuality in Counseling
Psychological Foundations and Human Development
The following course is required:
ED PSY 6210Life-Span: Individual and Family Development3
Educational Research and Evaluation Methods
The following course is required:
ED REM 6710Educational Research Methods and Design3
Electives and Area of Specialization9
Coursework in the area of specialization is to be selected in consultation with the adviser. Although not mandatory, areas of specialization may include career counseling, mental health counseling, rehabilitation counseling, addictions/substance abuse counseling, child and adolescent counseling, couples and family counseling, and others.
Comprehensive Examination (Capstone Experience) 1
Total Hours60
1

 Please consult with the Department office for requirements and dates of this examination.

Doctoral Program (Ph.D.) in Counselor Education and Supervision - Overview

Admission

Admissions will be conducted once per year. The deadline for applications is December 1, for a Fall Semester admission.

Mission

The Doctoral Program in Counselor Education and Supervision of the College of Education prepares doctoral level counselor educators and supervisors to train professional counselors who will provide services to meet the mental health needs of culturally diverse individuals, groups, couples, and families in need. The Department’s goal is to train practitioner-scholar-advocates who can contribute to the professional counseling field in academic, research, and practice contexts. The Department’s outreach extends to individuals who practice counseling in schools, colleges and universities, community based organizations, business and industry, as well as independent practice. The Department strives to develop a culturally diverse student population and to draw students from local, regional, national, and international locations.

Ph.D. in Education in Counseling

Mission

Students completing the Ph.D. in counseling will be knowledgeable about the counseling knowledge base; will be competent in research, measurement, and statistical methods; will be knowledgeable and experienced in counselor education and supervision; and will possess a high level of applied research and clinical skills. The goal of the program is to prepare professionals adept at theory development, qualitative and quantitative research methods, and integration of research with practice in counseling settings. The larger program intent is to produce researcher practitioners who can provide and assess services designed to enhance the lives of individuals facing extraordinary challenges throughout the lifespan.

Purpose and Objectives

The objectives of the Ph.D. in Education in Counseling Program are:

  1. to build upon and enhance the knowledge base in core counseling areas through successful completion of advanced doctoral coursework in research and counseling practice;
  2. to refine counseling practice skills and enhance the supervised experience base through successful completion of an advanced doctoral practicum and a doctoral internship;
  3. to teach and to require the ethical practice of counseling, counseling research, and counselor education through course work and supervision of practice;
  4. to enhance the student’s ability to identify and to solve complex problems in education and counseling;
  5. to train counselor educators and supervisors of counselors-in-training;
  6. to prepare professional counselors to provide a full-range of counseling services to individuals from differing cultural backgrounds facing extraordinary challenges throughout the life span. This requires academic training and supervised practice (both as a student and as a potential supervisor-in-training) addressing the concerns of clients from varied cultural backgrounds, including individuals in protected or minority statuses;
  7. to prepare professionals adept at (a) theory development; (b) qualitative and quantitative research methods; (c) integration of research with practice in school and non-school counseling settings through advanced coursework and a research seminar;
  8. to apply counseling theory to the process and practice of consultation in various counseling and educational contexts, learned primarily through the doctoral practicum and doctoral internship, but proceeded by classroom instruction on organizational climate, ethical climate, and problem solving;
  9. to provide a context for skill development and practice in individual, career, and group assessment (including intelligence, aptitude, achievement, interest, and personality assessment) through a supervised advanced doctoral practicum and doctoral internship;
  10. to train researchers, scholars, and academicians (counselor educators) and to develop and to refine scholarship skills for anticipated entry into the academy through advanced coursework including research methodology and counseling research; and
  11. to encourage and facilitate linkage to the counseling professional community and academy through organizational involvement and efforts to present scholarly findings at professional conferences or in professional journals. Students will be encouraged to submit their work for publication or presentation through professional and academic outlets.

Career Outlook

Elementary and Secondary School Counselors

The demand for school counselors throughout the state is quite high. There is a shortage of school counseling personnel at all levels. Additionally, many teachers who do not intend to leave the classroom pursue this program to be better able to meet the needs of their students. Some graduates of the program have left the field of education and have obtained positions such as those cited under Clinical Mental Health Counseling.

Note: It should be noted that in Missouri, persons who engage in "professional counseling" in many of these settings are required by law to be licensed as professional counselors.

Clinical Mental Health Counselors
Graduates have been employed in a wide variety of settings: as counselors in community colleges, universities, employment agencies, vocational rehabilitation agencies, probation and parole work, juvenile detention, alcoholism and substance abuse clinics, career planning and placement centers, community mental health agencies, family and children services, and various federally funded public service projects. Additionally, graduates are employed in career development, and business and industry positions, especially in training and personnel areas. Others have moved into roles calling for research and evaluation skills.

Master of Education in Community Education

(name change pending CBHE approval)

The Department of Education Sciences and Professional Programs provides students with an opportunity, through the M.Ed. in Community Education, to cultivate the insights, capacities, and skill sets required to lead educational innovation, harness the power of technology for community engagement, strengthen critical literacies, bridge in-school, out-of-school, and lifelong learning, and build stronger, more resilient communities. Through coursework and hands-on, place-based experiences, students will grapple with such concepts and practices as heritage, relevance, inclusion, collaboration, critical analysis, dialogue, co-created experiences, community capacity building, and empowerment. This degree is the nexus of putting knowledge into action in the service of community goals.

The M.Ed. in Community Education has 100% online options. The degree provides a scaffold from entry-level to leadership positions in parks, museums, science centers, public agencies, and other community service organizations. It also equips students to pursue practitioner-focused doctoral degrees (e.g., Doctorate in Educational Practice, Ed.D.) and research-focused doctoral degrees (e.g., Doctorate of Philosophy, Ph.D.) in education.

Admissions Requirements

Admissions requirements include an earned baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university with an overall grade point average of 3.0 or higher, a completed UMSL Graduate School Application Form, official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, and two letters of
recommendation.

Degree Requirements

The M.Ed. in Community Education consists of 33 hours of graduate coursework in the following areas:

CORE
EDUC/HIST 6142The History and Practice of Community Education 1
TCH ED 6440Innovation in Education3
ED TECH 6460Technology Development in Community Organizations3
ED FND 6422Analysis of Cultural Literacies3
EDUC 6442Leadership in Community Education3
Approved Electives (see Approved Electives information below)12-15
Capstone Experience (see Capstone Experience information below)3-6
Internship
Practicum in Public History and Cultural Heritage 2
1

HIST 6142 topic must be The History and Practice of Community Education.

2

HIST 6125 is for students pursuing a graduate certificate in Museums, Heritage and Public History.

Approved Electives 

To fulfill the approved elective requirement, students will complete an additional 12-15 credit hours of coursework. With advisor approval, students will choose 4 or 5 courses that meet their individualized needs. Faculty have expertise in such community education topics as: technology for community engagement; inclusive communities; health, human performance and community engagement; social justice and the urban educational context; adult education; and museums, heritage and public history.

Capstone Experience 

The capstone experience (3-6 credit hours) provides students with an opportunity to gain in-depth experience in a community education context. For professionals already working in community education contexts, the capstone experience facilitates project-based learning that can be completed on-site.

Master of Education in Educational Psychology

The Department of Education Sciences and Professional Programs provides training in the theory, research, and practice of the psychological mechanisms underlying teaching, learning, and human development of students as well as the related school processes and structures. The department also specializes in educational research, psychoeducational assessment, and school psychology.

The M.Ed. in Educational Psychology degree offers training in the theoretical principles, research, and practices of educational psychology. The degree is intended to facilitate career advancement within educational and community-based settings and to prepare candidates to pursue other advanced degrees in education or psychology. The M.Ed. in Educational Psychology degree consists of 33 hours of graduate coursework in the following areas:

A. Foundations (15 hours)

B. Electives (12-15 hours)

C. Capstone Experience (3-6 hours)

The foundations courses consist of 3 hours of study regarding the educational and psychological foundations of educational psychology, 3 hours of learning and cognition, 3 hours of human development, and 6 hours of statistics, research design, and/or program evaluation. The specific courses chosen for the electives and capstone experience will vary according to the candidate’s interests and the emphasis area, if any, that is chosen.

Emphasis Areas

When completing the basic degree requirements for the M.Ed. in Educational Psychology, candidates may choose one of two optional emphasis areas: (1) Character and Citizenship Education or (2) Educational Research and Program Evaluation. These emphasis areas are created via completion of specified lists of courses from which to choose rather than 15 hours in free electives.

Admissions Requirements

Admissions requirements include an earned baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university with an overall grade point average of 3.0 or higher, a completed UMSL Graduate School Application Form, official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended, and two letters of recommendation.

Curriculum (33 hours)

Foundations
Educational Foundations3
Choose one of the following:
Psychology Of Education
Foundations Of School Psychology
Learning and Cognition3
Choose one of the following:
Instruction, Learning And Assessment
Psychology Of Learning Processes
Human Development3
Choose one of the following:
Life-Span: Individual and Family Development
Psychology Of Early Childhood Development
Advanced Studies in Child and Adolescent Development
The Psychology Of Adolescence
Research Methods6
Choose one the following two course blocks:
Statistical Analysis For Education Research
Advanced Research Design In Education
or
Educational Research Methods and Design
Educational Program Evaluation
Electives15
Choose four or five of the following: 1
Instruction, Learning And Assessment
Psychology Of Education
Psychopathology And Diagnosis
Personality And Social Development
Life-Span: Individual and Family Development
Psychology Of Early Childhood Development
Foundations Of Citizenship Education
Advanced Studies in Child and Adolescent Development
The Psychology Of Adolescence
Current Perspectives On Citizenship Education
Character Education And Development
Technology-Supported Inquiry Learning
Advanced Methods In Character Education
Problems
Foundations Of School Psychology
Psychoeducational Differences
Biological Bases Of Behavior
Psychoeducational Interventions
Social-Emotional and Behavior Interventions
Consultation In Schools And Related Settings
Professional Issues In School Psychology
Problems
Classroom Measurement And Evaluation
Educational Research Methods and Design
Academic Assessment and Intervention
Psychoeducational Assessment And Intervention
Advanced Psychoeducational Assessment and Intervention
Educational Program Evaluation
Advanced Theory And Practice In Educational Program Evaluation
Capstone Experience3
Choose one or two of the following:
School Psychology Practicum I
Internship
Advanced Theory And Practice In Educational Program Evaluation
Internship
Thesis Research 2
Total Hours33
1
Electives may include up to six hours of 6000-level courses from other Disciplines.
2

Candidates choosing the Thesis Capstone Experience will have 12 hours of Electives

Emphasis in Character and Citizenship Education 

Foundations
Educational Foundations3
Psychology Of Education
Learning and Cognition3
Choose one of the following:
Instruction, Learning And Assessment
Psychology Of Learning Processes
Human Development3
Advanced Studies in Child and Adolescent Development
Research Methods6
Choose one of the following two course blocks:
Statistical Analysis For Education Research
Advanced Research Design In Education
or
Educational Research Methods and Design
Educational Program Evaluation
Emphasis Area
Required6
Foundations Of Citizenship Education
Character Education And Development
Choose one of the following:3
Personality And Social Development
Life-Span: Individual and Family Development
Psychology Of Early Childhood Development
The Psychology Of Adolescence
Choose one or two of the following:6
Current Perspectives On Citizenship Education
Advanced Methods In Character Education
Problems
Educational Program Evaluation
Advanced Theory And Practice In Educational Program Evaluation
Capstone Experience3
Choose one of the following:
Internship
Advanced Theory And Practice In Educational Program Evaluation
Internship
Thesis Research 1
Total Hours33
1

Candidates choosing the Thesis Capstone Experience will have 12 hours in the Emphasis Area 

 Emphasis in Educational Research and Program Evaluation

Foundations
Educational Foundations3
Psychology Of Education
Learning and Cognition3
Choose one of the following:
Instruction, Learning And Assessment
Psychology Of Learning Processes
Human Development3
Choose one of the following:
Life-Span: Individual and Family Development (Choose one of the following:)
Psychology Of Early Childhood Development
Advanced Studies in Child and Adolescent Development
The Psychology Of Adolescence
Research Methods6
Choose one of the following two course blocks:
Statistical Analysis For Education Research
Advanced Research Design In Education
or
Educational Research Methods and Design
Educational Program Evaluation
Emphasis Area
Required6
Educational Program Evaluation
Advanced Theory And Practice In Educational Program Evaluation
Choose three to five of the following: 19
Instruction, Learning And Assessment
Problems
Classroom Measurement And Evaluation
Academic Assessment and Intervention
Advanced Research Design In Education
Teacher Action Research I
Teacher Action Research Capstone
Capstone Experience
Choose one or two of the following:
Advanced Theory And Practice In Educational Program Evaluation
Internship
Thesis Research 2
Total Hours30
1

Emphasis Area courses will vary when ED REM 6730 and ED REM 6732 are used to fulfill other degree requirements.

2

Candidates choosing the Thesis Capstone Experience will have 12 hours in the Emphasis Area

Educational Specialist in School Psychology

The Educational Specialist in School Psychology (Ed.S.) degree program at the University of Missouri-St. Louis is a National Association of School Psychologists-approved program whose primary goal is to prepare future school psychologists to assume a wide array of professional roles in schools. Built upon a foundation of data-based decision making and problem solving methodology, the program highlights the critical importance of providing timely prevention, early intervention, and intensive research-based interventions to address academic and mental/behavioral health difficulties within a framework of multitiered systems of support, As such, the UMSL School Psychology Program promotes development of advanced student- and systems-level knowledge and skills to support all students via the following candidate learning outcomes:

A. Improved Academic and Mental/Behavioral Health Outcomes

Candidates will develop advanced skills  with multifaceted assessment and data collection techniques, treatment planning and implementation, and evaluation of student outcomes for academic and mental/behavioral health difficulties.

B. Culturally-Responsive Practice and Social Justice

Candidates will understand identity development and develop the skills necessary to work with and advocate for culturally- and linguistically-diverse students and families in a competent and socially-just manner.

C. Program Development and Evaluation

Candidates will learn qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods data collection and research methodologies that will enable them to develop, implement, and evaluate a wide array of school-based interventions and programs for students, educators, and parents.

D. Facilitation of Organizational Change

Candidates will acquire a systems-level perspective of the educational, social, and political influences on development and will use this knowledge to promote systemic and policy changes that will improve educational and psychological outcomes for all students.

The Ed. S. in School Psychology degree program consists of 60 graduate semester hours that includes coursework in educational and psychological foundations, consultation, psychoeducational assessment, and direct and indirect interventions. The small cohort-based nature of the program (approximately 8-12 candidates admitted each year) fosters close relationships with colleagues, faculty, and field-based practitioners.

Admission requirements include a 3.0 undergraduate GPA, current GRE General Test scores (Verbal, Quantitative and Analytical Writing scores at or above the 50th percentile recommended), three letters of recommendation, a personal statement describing personal goals (not to exceed five double-spaced typed pages) and a curriculum vita detailing relevant experience with children, adolescents, and families. Prerequisite coursework in the areas of Developmental Psychology, and Psychological Statistics is required for admission. Following initial screening, finalists will be invited for on-campus interviews with the School Psychology Program faculty and current Ed. S. candidates. All required application materials will be considered equally when making admission decisions. Applications are reviewed annually with a February 15 deadline.

Transfer credit may be granted for graduate coursework completed prior to entering the program, but strict limitations apply. The Ed. S. in School Psychology degree program involves a minimum of three years of intensive study. Though it is possible to complete the first year of the curriculum on a part-time basis, please note that practicum during the second year involves two days per week working in a school with a school psychologist, and internship is a yearlong fulltime supervised experience. Consequently, full-time study is recommended and preferred. Graduates of the program are immediately eligible for School Psychologist Certification from the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and the Nationally Certified School Psychologist credential from the National Association of School Psychologists. As such, graduates from the program will meet or exceed certification requirements in the majority if not all states in the country.

Curriculum

First Year
FallHoursSpringHoursSummerHours
ED PSY 6222 or 62103ED PSY 63103ED PSY 61153
ED PSY 65303ED PSY 65503ED REM 67193
ED PSY 65323ED REM 67103 
ED PSY 65453ED REM 67183 
 12 12 6
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours 
ED PSY 65403ED PSY 65363 
ED PSY 65903ED PSY 65423 
ED REM 67303ED PSY 65913 
SPEC ED 6437 or 63253ED REM 67323 
 12 12
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours 
ED PSY 65983ED PSY 65993 
 3 3
Total Hours: 60

In addition to completion of the 60-hour curriculum listed above, candidates for the Ed.S. in School Psychology degree must receive passing scores on the following programmatic assessments: Praxis School Psychologist Examination and two Problem-Solving Case Studies (one academic, one behavioral).

Graduate Certificate in Community College Leadership

The Graduate Certificate program in Community College Leadership (CCL) is a collaborative effort between the University of Missouri – Kansas City (UMKC) School of Education and the University of Missouri – St. Louis (UMSL) College of Education.

For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this graduate certificate program, and other important information, please visit our Gainful Employment Disclosure website: http://umsl.edu/go/BoO.  

The certificate program will allow participating candidates to develop skills and knowledge through completing the 18 hour curriculum outlined in the following section:

HIGHERED 6430The Community College (Taught by UMSL Faculty - Entry Level course)3
HIGHERED 6431Community College Leadership (Taught by UMSL Faculty )3
EDUL 5559Current Issues in the Community College (Taught by UMKC Faculty) 3
EDUL 5553 Supervising and Managing People (Taught by UMKC Faculty)3
Elective (Can be taken from either institution or an approved elective from the student’s home institution)3
Select one of the following (Capstone Experience):3
Internship (UMSL)
EDUL 5571
Internship in Higher Education (UMKC)
Total Hours18

Graduate Certificate in Program Evaluation in Education

The Graduate Certificate in Program Evaluation in Education provides specialized study in the theory and practice of program evaluation. The program will build on the content area knowledge base of the individual’s bachelors and masters degree. The focus of the Program Evaluation in Education certificate will be on the skills delineated in the standards and guidelines of the American Evaluation Association and the Joint Committee on Standards in Educational Evaluation.

For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this graduate certificate program, and other important information, please visit our Gainful Employment Disclosure website: http://umsl.edu/go/BqE

The certificate will consist of 18 hours of core courses and internship experiences. Graduate credits earned in equivalent courses in Education or related Social Science disciplines may meet some of these requirements. 

Research Methods
ED REM 6750Advanced Research Design In Education3
ED REM 7771Quantitative Research Methods I3
ED REM 7781Qualitative Methods In Educational Research I3
Program Evaluation
ED REM 6730Educational Program Evaluation3
ED REM 6732Advanced Theory And Practice In Educational Program Evaluation3
ED REM 6990Internship1-10
Total Hours16-25

Graduate Certificate programs are a minimum of 18 credit hours.

Graduate Certificate in Institutional Research

The Post-Master’s Certificate in Institutional Research (CPIR) is for academics who want training in Institutional Research in preparation for working in an IR Office at a postsecondary institution, a government agency, or a private education organization. The program consists of 18 hours and may be taken as part of a doctoral program. Of the 18 hours, 12 are in the required core (6 hours are in research methods and 6 hours in IR seminars), plus a 3-hour Higher Education (HIGHERED) or an Educational Research (ED REM) elective and a 3-hour capstone. Students may transfer up to 5 hours of post-Master’s work into the program with the approval of the advisor.

For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this graduate certificate program, and other important information, please visit our Gainful Employment Disclosure  website: http://www.umsl.edu/gradschool/gradprograms/gainful-emp/gedt-inst-rsch.html

Graduate Certificate in Social Justice in Education 

The Graduate Certificate in Social Justice in Education supports the understanding, knowledge, and skills needed to create a just and equitable society. The curriculum focuses on institutional and personal processes, values, attitudes, and behaviors that sustain injustice while encouraging the development of positive educational, familial, community-centric, and social group advocacy and action.

For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this graduate certificate program, and other important information, please visit our Gainful Employment Disclosure website: http://www.umsl.edu/gradschool/gradprograms/gainful-emp/gedt-soc-jus.html

The Graduate Certificate in Social Justice is an 18 credit hour program. To earn a certificate, one must a) complete 6 credit hours in the Foundations Choice Sequence, b) complete 12 credit hours in the Elective Choice Sequences, and as a capstone c) submit during the final semester of the program, for review by a faculty panel, an artifact/assignment from a Certificate course together with a written reflection that articulates in what ways it represents one's learning to become more culturally competent and socially just.

Foundations Sequence6
Select 2 of 3 courses
Critical Race Theory in Education
Examining History, Community And Social Justice In Education
Gender, Language & Identity
Social Justice Electives12
Select four courses from the list of electives. The elective courses are organized into three categories: Social Justice and Action, Diversity, and Culture and Context. You may select your electives from any or all categories.
Social Justice and Action Elective Courses
Counseling African American Clients
Counseling Sexual Minorities
Social Class and Poverty Issues In Counseling
Teacher Action, Advocacy And Leadership
Or other approved elective
Diversity Elective Courses
Foundations for Multicultural Counseling
Critical Race Theory in Education 1
Introduction to Feminist and Gender Theory
Examining History, Community And Social Justice In Education 1
Gender, Language & Identity 1
Or other approved elective
Culture and Context Elective Courses
Current Issues In Counseling Special Needs Populations
Demographic Contexts of Education
Political Contexts Of Education
Critical Race Theory in Education
Discourse Analysis In Education
Technology and Privilege
Or other approved elective
1

Course not taken for the Foundations Sequence requirement may be taken as an Elective course.

Graduate Certificate in Student Affairs Administration & Leadership

The Graduate Certificate in Student Affairs Administration & Leadership (SAAL) would prepare participants to develop the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary to pursue entry-level staff and administrative positions with a concentrated emphasis in student affairs administration and leadership.

For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this graduate certificate program, and other important information, please visit our Gainful Employment Disclosure website: http://umsl.edu/go/BqZ.

Students would develop the requisite knowledge and skills upon completion of an 18-hour curriculum which is outlined below:

HIGHERED 5402Student Affairs Administration (Introductory course)3
HIGHERED 6406Governance Of Higher Education3
HIGHERED 6408Legal Issues in Student Affairs3
HIGHERED 6409Critical Issues in Student Affairs3
HIGHERED 6410Ethics in Higher Education Administration3
HIGHERED 6476Organization And Administration Of Higher Education (Exit course)3
Total Hours18

Adult Education Courses

ADULT ED 4311 Teaching Basic Reading Skills to Adults: 3 semester hours

A study of the reading process and of the characteristics of adult learners with a focus on instructional techniques and materials useful in upgrading the performance of adults with deficient reading skills.

ADULT ED 6230 Adult Learning and Development: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED PSY 6210 or ED PSY 6111, or ADULT ED 6410. A study of how life stage theories and theories of learning pertain to the adult learner. The research bases of these theories will be explored in relationship to instrudtional practice with adult learners.

ADULT ED 6404 Seminar in Adult Education Research: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisites: ADULT ED 6410 or consent of instructor. A review of current research on various topics in the field of adult education. An in-depth study of these research topics will be conducted. Application to the field of adult education will be considered. Special focus will be placed on assessing and improving competency in educational, corporate and community settings.

ADULT ED 6410 The Adult Learner: 3 semester hours

This course is designed for those who help adults learn in a variety of settings. A study will be made of the characteristics of Adult Learners and various theories of how they learn, as well as the implications of these characteristics and theories for Adult Education Research, Programming, Curriculum, Planning, and Instructional Practice.

ADULT ED 6411 History of Adult Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ADULT ED 6410. In this course the historical foundation of the field of Adult Education in America will be studied. This will include the major theorists and their contributions; together with the continuing education of the adult in a progressive social context.

ADULT ED 6412 Philosophical Foundations of Adult Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ADULT ED 6410 or consent of instructor. A comprehensive, systematic philosophical foundation for adult education. In this course the philosophical underpinnings of the various approaches to the education of adults will be explored. These include the role of the learner, the teacher, and overall objectives within each philosophy.

ADULT ED 6413 Improvement of Instruction in Adult Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ADULT ED 6410 or consent of instructor. A study of selected methods and instructional techniques appropriate for the teaching of adults. An examination of current research will be made as it relates to the problems of instructing adults.

ADULT ED 6414 Curriculum Theory And Development In Adult Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ADULT ED 6410 or consent of instructor. A study of curriculum theory and its application to adult education. Particular emphasis will be placed on the development of model curricula for various programs in adult education.

ADULT ED 6415 Adult Literacy Perspectives: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ADULT ED 6410. Students will draw upon a variety of disciplines in considering the ideological, political, economic, moral, and pedagogical dimensions of literacy education. This is significant since popular, as well as scholarly, views of literacy assert its importance to a variety of personal and societal goals. In addition to a theoretical perspective, students will explore practical applications of literacy.

ADULT ED 6416 Survey of Adult Distance Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ADULT ED 6410. This course is designed as a survey of distance education covering the concept, theories, history, present practice, delivery systems, major issues and future directions of the field of distance learning. Emphasis is on research and practice in the U.S.; however, since much of the literature in the field has been written by educators in other countries, the course will explore topics and issues in distance education from an international perspective, identifying similarities and differences among countries as they relate to adult learning.

ADULT ED 6417 Multicultural Issues in Adult Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ADULT ED 6410. In this course the learners will discuss cultural diversity from an adult education perspective. Topics include cultural self-awareness, challenges/issues in intercultural educational settings, theoretical perspectives of multicultural education, and practioner concerns and strategies for implementing multiculturalism in adult education settings.

ADULT ED 6418 Assessment In The Adult Classroom: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ADULT ED 6410 and ED REM 6707 or consent of instructor. This course addresses assessing how effectively adult educators are facilitating adult learning. Emphasis will be on knowledge and skills, learner characteristics, and learner reactions to instruction through the use of formative assessment of both student learning and instructional effectiveness in the adult classroom. Special attention will focus this assessment in the adult classroom within educational, corporate, community, and non-formal settings.

ADULT ED 6419 Developing Intercultural Competence: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ADULT ED 6410. The focus of this course is on intercultural competence theories and concepts designed to build personal, academic, and professional skills. It is intended to enable the individual to function more successfully in a global environment.

ADULT ED 6420 Survey of Human Resource Development and Adult Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. This course provides an overview of the fields of human resource development and adult education. The many societal contexts within which the training of adults and organization development occur will be examined. The systems theory that frames a discussion of adult education, training, and organization development is also explored. The unique characteristics of each field will be represented as well as the ways in which the two field come together along some general concepts: Definitions, philosophies, goals, sponsoring agencies, professional roles, processes, participants, and resources.

ADULT ED 6424 Intervention Determination in Adult Learning and Human Resource Dev: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ADULT ED 6410. A variety of strategies will be studied with a view to examining systemic problems in workforce and adult learning situations. The determination of interventions for program planning and development is the major focus. As key outcomes for this course, learners will be able to design and develop plans, and distinguish among workplace, community and educational needs that can be met with educational interventions and those that require other, and more appropriate, nontraining solutions. While specifically focused on HRD applications, the content of this course will apply to any educational setting for adults.

ADULT ED 6440 Developing Critical Thinking Through Reading and Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. A study of developing critical thinking through focusing upon reading and writing instructional techniques and materials useful in upgrading the performance of secondary, higher education, and adult learners.

ADULT ED 6494 Directed Readings in Adult Learning: 1-6 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing, ADULT ED 6410 and consent of instructor. Self-directed learning, as a key concept in Adult Education, is encouraged as a means of understanding the adult experience, both personally and professionally, and is a recognized core competency in the field of Adult Education. This course consists of supervised, independent study into the current research, literature, and issues in the area of Adult Learning. Learners are given the opportunity to meet with other learners and the instructor on a regular basis to share resources, ideas, and to gain feedback.

ADULT ED 6497 Problems in Adult Education: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisite: ADULT ED 6410 or consent of instructor. Independent study on topics in adult education.

ADULT ED 6540 Comparative International Adult and Higher Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ADULT ED 6410 or HIGHERED 6476. A study of lifelong learning as well as adult and higher education with a view to a more global understanding of educational systems. Selected western and non-western educational themes and issues will be viewed from the context of their respective cultures.

ADULT ED 6990 Internship: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisite: ADULT ED 6410 or consent of instructor. Closely supervised experience in a field setting under the direction of a graduate faculty member. An appropriate level of competence and evidence of growth in the professional role must be demonstrated by the intern. The internship will include planning, research, evaluation, and related professional activities.

ADULT ED 7820 Policy Issues in Adult Education: 3 semester hours

This course should be taken immediately after admittance into the doctoral program. In this course, students will engage in a systematic examination of issues related to adult education. This will include, but not be limited to, legislative policies, delivery systems, and occupational issues. Students will be expected to examine trends in adult education practice and/or related fields.

ADULT ED 7822 Advance Research in Adult Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ADULT ED 7820. This course will build on ADULT ED 7820 in which students will engage in a systematic and critical examination and discussion of research related to adult education and relatd area topics.

ADULT ED 7824 Communicating Theory and Practice in Adult Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ADULT ED 7822. Students will learn the processes involved in writing for publication. In conjunction with instructor, students will engage in a project that merges theory and practice. Course should be taken the semester before a student enrolls in EDUC 7950.

Counselor Education Courses

CNS ED 1400 Making a Career Choice: 3 semester hours

Introduces students to career development theories and the career decision-making process. Students receive an overview of career development theory and learn how these theories pertain to the formulation of individual career plans. Self-knowledge of career interests, values, beliefs, aptitudes, and other factors are explored. Self-assessment and decision-making techniques learned in this class can be revisited throughout the life span. The seminar format allows for small group discussion of career-related issues and personal application of career development principles.

CNS ED 3220 Counseling Individuals with Special Needs: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: TCH ED 3313 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. A course emphasizing counseling skills for individuals who plan to work with people with disabilities. Emphasis is placed on using counseling strategies with school-age children with disabilities.

CNS ED 6000 Personal and Professional Development in Counseling: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Provisional Acceptance to the Counseling Program or Consent of Instructor. This course provides an in-depth view of the professional counseling field. Attention is focused on the development of the helping relationship, including a review of research on factors which influence helping processes and rapport building, a development of skills used in the counseling process, and increased awareness of how students' values, beliefs, and behaviors are related to counselor effectiveness.

CNS ED 6010 Theories of Counseling: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: CNS ED 6000. This course will explore the philosophical foundations of counseling theory. The major constructs of contemporary counseling approaches will be discussed and the practical applications of these theories will be analyzed.

CNS ED 6020 Ethical and Professional Issues in Counseling: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6000. Ethical, legal, and professional issues related to counseling are addressed. Ethical dilemmas in the provision of counseling services to individuals, couples, families, and groups are defined. Specific ethical codes of professional organizations are examined.

CNS ED 6030 Foundations for Multicultural Counseling: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6000 with a grade of B or better and CNS ED 6010. This course will focus on: (1) reviewing knowledge and research in the area of multicultural counseling, (2) developing and/or enhancing skills useful in counseling with individuals from minority populations, and (3) developing levels of personal awareness about stereotypes, and learning how feelings and attitudes about these may impact counseling with individuals from minority populations.

CNS ED 6040 Group Procedures in Counseling: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6000 with a grade of B or better and CNS ED 6010 and CNS ED 6270 or CNS ED 6370. This course examines the process dynamics of groups including group development, leadership, norms and therapeutic factors. Group counseling theories and approaches used for other group work including: skills, personal growth, support, vocational, and developmental guidance groups are included. Knowledge and skills of how to facilitate therapeutic groups are included. Students will be required to be participant-observers or facilitators of a group outside of class time.

CNS ED 6050 Individual Inventory: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ED REM 6709. Uses of educational and psychological appraisal techniques in counseling, develops counselor's abilities in assisting clients toward self-awareness through the use of test and non-test data. Ethical practices in the use of tests and the maintenance of personnel records are stressed.

CNS ED 6070 Psychopathology and Diagnosis: 3 semester hours

Same as ED PSY 6113. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Covers etiology, assessment and diagnosis of mental disorders using contemporary diagnostic systems. Course materials and assignment address the dynamics of adjustment and treatment implication for counselors, school psychologists, and others in the helping professions.

CNS ED 6200 Foundations of School Guidance: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6000 with a grade of B or better. The purpose of this course is to give students a foundation for understanding the history, philosophy, and development of school guidance programs. The role functions of the school counselor within a developmental, comprehensive program are examined, along with communication skills necessary for consultation with students, parents, school support staff, and resource people in the community nonacademic needs.

CNS ED 6220 Current Issues In Counseling Special Needs Populations: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. Designed to analyze relevant literature and to provide communication skills training for those professionals in school settings who work with individuals with special needs. The characteristics and social and emotional needs of this special population will be discussed as well as the impact of special needs on the family system.

CNS ED 6270 School Counseling Practicum: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Grades of B- or better in CNS ED 6000, CNS ED 6010, and CNS ED 6020 or consent of instructor. One hundred clock hours of supervised practice in counseling to provide the opportunity for students to pragmatically integrate and process materials, theories, techniques, and methodologies as they are applied in the counseling profession with emphasis on school counseling.

CNS ED 6280 School Counseling Field Experience: 1-6 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6000, CNS ED 6010, and CNS ED 6270 (all courses with a grade of B- or better or S, as appropriate); or consent of instructor. A 100-clock-hour field experience for each semester-credit-hour of enrollment. Students will be closely supervised under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students must demonstrate counseling competencies and skillful ethical practice. Students will received 1.5 contact hours of group supervision weekly by a graduate faculty member and 1 contact hour of individual supervision weekly by field experience site supervisor during terms of enrollment. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 semester-credit-hours.

CNS ED 6300 Foundations of Clinical Mental Health Counseling: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6000 with a grade of B or better and CNS ED 6010. A survey of counseling in a variety of mental health settings. Introduction to the basic philosophical, historical, and psychological foundations of clinical mental health counseling. Designed to acquaint the student with the foundations and roles of the professional counselor in various community and agency settings.

CNS ED 6370 Clinical Mental Health Counseling Practicum I: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Grades of B- or better in CNS ED 6000, CNS ED 6010, and CNS ED 6020 or consent of instructor. One hundred clock hours of supervised practice in counseling to provide the opportunity for students to pragmatically integrate and process materials, theories, techniques, and methodologies as they are applied in the counseling profession, focusing on clinical mental health counseling.

CNS ED 6375 Clinical Mental Health Counseling Practicum II: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6000, CNS ED 6010, and CNS ED 6370 (all courses with a grade of B- or better or S, as appropriate) or consent of instructor. One hundred clock hours of supervised advanced practice in counseling to provide the opportunity for students to continue to integrate and process theories, techniques, and methods as they are applied to the professional practice of counseling, with an emphasis on clinical mental health counseling.

CNS ED 6380 Clinical Mental Health Counseling Field Experience: 1-6 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6000, CNS ED 6010, and CNS ED 6370 (all courses with a grade of B- or better or S, as appropriate); or consent of instructor. A-100-clock hour field experience for each semester-credit-hour of enrollment. Students will be closely supervised under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students must demonstrate counseling competencies and skillful ethical practice. Students will receive 1.5 contact hours of group supervision weekly by a graduate faculty member and 1 contact hour of individual supervision weekly by a field experience site supervisor during terms of enrollment. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 semester-credit-hours.

CNS ED 6400 Career Information and Development: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6000 with a grade of B or better and graduate standing. Emphasis is on the nature of the changing labor market and the impact on personal, social, economic, career, and educational aspects of individuals and society. Use of occupational and educational information systems and resources to assist with career decisions are examined. The needs of culturally diverse populations are discussed. Use of career and labor market information and programs such as computer technology to access up-to-date career and labor market information is explored. Techniques and methods of career counseling are discussed. Various theories of career development and career choice will be examined.

CNS ED 6404 Seminar: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

CNS ED 6410 Advanced Career Development: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6400 or consent of instructor Emphasis in on current theories of career development, career choice, and techniques and methods of career counseling. Issues concerning education and training, work, leisure, the family, life roles, and culturally diverse populations are studied. The role of career theory in planning, development, and delivery of a career development program is explored.

CNS ED 6420 Career Assessment in Counseling and Rehabilitation: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6050 and CNS ED 6400 or consent of instructor. This course provides an in-depth and specialized look at the educational and psychological assessment techniques used in career counseling, especially the assessment of career interests, work values, work environment, work skills, work samples, career development stages, career maturity, career decision making, and career beliefs. Issues of using computers in the delivery of career development services will be discussed.

CNS ED 6497 Problems: 1-10 semester hours

.

CNS ED 6500 Introduction to Systems Theory for Couples and Family Counseling: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: CNS ED 6010 or Consent of Instructor. This course is an introduction to relationship theory as applied to couples and family counseling. General systems theory, and social constructivism theory are reviewed. Students learn relationship interventions and beginning couple and family counseling techniques. Tthical, professional, and legal issues related to couples and family counseling are addressed.

CNS ED 6510 Marriage Counseling and Enrichment: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: CNS ED 6500 or consent of instructor. This course focuses on the theory and techniques of marital or couples counseling and enrichment. Models and methods for prevention and treatment of relationship dysfunction are explored. Relationship developmental issues are addressed. Students are challenged to develop the critical skills necessary to be effective marriage counselors and marital-life educators.

CNS ED 6520 Family Counseling: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: CNS ED 6500 and CNS ED 6270, or CNS ED 6370, or consent of instructor. This course offers an in-depth analysis of strategic, structural, experiential, communications, behavioral, and pscyhodynamic approaches to systems change and family counseling. The range of techniques and applied practices evolving from each orientation are explored as are normal and dysfunctional family processes. Various counseling modalities, such as individual, concurrent, collaborative, conjoint, group, intergenerational, and networking are also considered.

CNS ED 6600 Theories and Techniques of Counseling Children and Adolescents: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6000, CNS ED 6010 (with a grade of B or better in both courses) or permission of instructor. This course focuses on counseling theories and their applicability to the developmental special concerns of children and adolescents including child-at risk issues such as: abuse, suicide, divorce, and death and dying. Individual, group, and family intervention techniques and consultation skills will be emphasized, as well as legal and ethical considerations for counselors. Strategies presented can be utilized in a variety of settings. Multicultural considerations are also addressed.

CNS ED 6610 Introduction to Play Therapy: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Provides students a foundation for understanding the history, theories and application of play therapy. Working with children in both agency and school settings will be discussed as well as how play therapy skills can be incorporated into the student's developing theoretical framework. Can count towards the Registered Play Therapist Credential.

CNS ED 6620 Advanced Play Therapy: 3-4 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6610. Helps students further develop their play therapy skills, especially in the area of client-centered play therapy. Examines the use of play therapy with traumatized children and aggressive children in both school and agency settings. Group play therapy and sand tray therapy as additional modalities will also be explored. Ethical and legal issues as well as supervision in play therapy will be emphasized. Can count towards the Registered Play Therapist credential.

CNS ED 6630 High School Transitions/Post-Secondary Counseling: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6000, CNS ED 6010, CNS ED 6200; or consent of instructor. Knowledge and skills regarding development and implementation of programs and processes for guiding secondary education students through the transition from high school to employment (including military) and/or post-secondary education (voc-tech training, community college, university, etc.). Places post-secondary career planning within the context of a developmental guidance curriculum to address the needs of all students. Intended for graduate students who are preparing to become high school counselors, as well as those interested in college advising and career counseling.

CNS ED 6700 Introduction to Addictive Behaviors and Addiction Counseling: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6010 or consent of instructor. Exploration of the theoretical foundations of contemporary approaches to such addictive behaviors as alcohol and drug abuse, smoking, compulsive gambling, and sexual addiction. The nature, etiology, prevention, and treatment of addictions are discussed and analyzed from a variety of theoretical perspectives. The applications of these specific theoretical models to various treatment settings are examined. Multicultural considerations are also addressed.

CNS ED 6710 Advanced Strategies in Addictions Counseling: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6700 or consent of instructor. Study of advanced, empirically supported counseling approaches and techniques for the treatment of addictive behaviors. An emphasis is placed on screening and assessment procedures and on matching interventions to individual client and community needs.

CNS ED 6720 Counseling Individuals with Co-Occurring Disorders: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6700 or consent of instructor. This course introduces the student to the special needs, concerns, and problems encountered when counseling clients who have co-occurring substance use and mental health problems. Subject areas include an overview of screening and assessment, evidence-based practices, counseling approaches and psychopharmacology for co-occurring disorders.

CNS ED 6810 Integrating Religion and Spirituality in Counseling: 3 semester hours

This course is for counselors and students wishing to develop the methods to integrate religion and spirituality in counseling and learn about counseling strategies for persons of various religious backgrounds, the link between health and religion, and ethics involved in the assessment and integration of religion and spirituality in practice.

CNS ED 6820 Counseling Women Toward Empowerment: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6000, CNS ED 6010, and CNS ED 6270 or CNS ED 6370, or consent of instructor. An introduction to Women's issues in counseling. Relational theory, healthy female development, and an overview of clinical issues most common to females will be presented.

CNS ED 6830 Counseling African American Clients: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6000 and CNS ED 6010, or consent of instructor. This course is designed to promote an increased awareness and understanding of the psychological development and mental health needs of African American clients. This course also offers research-based theoretical strategies for counseling this diverse population.

CNS ED 6840 Counseling Sexual and Gender Minorities: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6000 and CNS ED 6010, or consent of instructor. This course is focused on affirmative perspectives on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) issues and populations. All of the major professional mental health organizations have formal ethical guidelines requiring non-discrimination with regard to LGBT populations and all of the organizations are active in promoting affirmative perspectives. Students will learn current perspectives in the fields of counseling and psychology on LGBT issues necessary for adequate practice or research in this area. A major focus will be on developing awareness and knowledge related to these populations.

CNS ED 6850 Social Class and Poverty Issues In Counseling: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6000 and CNS ED 6010, or consent of the instructor. This course focuses on the experience of poor people in the United States. Specifically, the circumstances of poverty, the consequences of living in poverty (on behaviors, aspirations, relationships, education, and health including mental health), and the impact of poverty on the helping relationship will be addressed. Personal, social, and cultural aspects of poverty will be examined in both rural and urban settings. One objective of this course is to reduce the psychological distance between the poor client and the non-poor counselor. Included in this endeavor are specific attitude and techniques designed to maximize the quality of a counselor's work with poorer clients.

CNS ED 6860 Human Sexuality in Counseling: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6000 and CNS ED 6010, or consent of instructor. This course will focus on integrating issues of human sexuality into the counseling process. The psycho-sexual development of the individual from birth throughout the life span will be discussed and compared to other developmental tasks at each age. Themes related to influences from family, culture, environment, socioeconomic, ethnic, and religious perceptions of sexuality will be integrated. The physiology of human sexual function will be addressed, including variations in sexual orientation and gender identity.

CNS ED 6870 Counseling and Cultural Competence in a Global Society: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6030 or consent of instructor. Through a mixed methods approach of cultural immersion, readings, class activities, and forums with cultural and educational leaders, counselor candidates will acquire strategies to collaborate with culturally diverse families and develop systemic approaches to equalize the experiences for every child/adolescent/adult client. Counselor candidates will broaden their world view and global perspective, and identify and develop culturally sensitive interventions for a range of counseling issues and settings. Candidates will also examine the impact of contemporary socio-cultural viewpoints.

CNS ED 7000 Advanced Theories and Foundations of Counseling Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Doctoral standing or instructor consent. A seminar on the discipline of counseling psychology, including its history, development, and current status. An important focus will be contemporary and emergent theories in the field.

CNS ED 7010 Advanced Multicultural Counseling: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6030 and doctoral standing or consent of instructor. This advanced course addresses theories and research in multicultural counseling.

CNS ED 7020 Seminar in Counseling Research: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED REM 6710, doctoral standing or consent of instructor. The purpose of this course is to review and analyze current counseling research literature. Ethical issues will be addressed.

CNS ED 7025 Advanced Counseling Research: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 7020 or consent of instructor. Engages students in the conduct of an empirical research project. Building from the research proposal developed in CNS ED 7020, students will obtain IRB approval, collect data, analyze the data, and write a manuscript reporting the results in journal article format.

CNS ED 7030 Counselor Education and Supervision: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Master's degree in Counseling. An introduction to clinical supervision in counseling. Theories, models, and research in supervision will be presented. Students will supervise master's level students in practicum and internship courses in counseling.

CNS ED 7035 Counselor Education and Supervision Practicum: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admission to the Counseling Option in the Ed.D. or Ph.D. Program. Offers advanced training in counseling supervision. Students will supervise master's level students in practicum and internship courses in counseling. Students will be expected to maintain as assigned caseload of supervisees and attend three hours of weekly doctoral-level supervision.

CNS ED 7040 Advanced Group Procedures in Counseling: 30 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 6040 Group Procedures in Counseling. Examines advanced group leadership theory, development, and facilitation. Knowledge and skills of how to facilitate therapeutic groups within ethical and legal guidelines are included. Specific attention will be paid to developing effective group work skills and interventions in career, clinical mental health, and school counseling settings. Students will be required to conceptualize, develop and facilitate a group outside of class time.

CNS ED 7075 Teaching, Learning, and Technology in Counselor Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 7000 and CNS ED 7770. Examines pedagogy and epistemology of counselor education. Philosophies of teaching, instructional design, instructional methods, assessment of learning, and the impact and use of technology in teaching will be explored within the framework of the eight core courses as defined by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling & Related Educational Programs (CACREP). Students will both learn and apply classroom teaching knowledge and skills.

CNS ED 7400 Advanced Topics in School Counseling Leadership: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admission to the Counseling Option in the Ed.D. Program. Focuses on leadership roles and advanced skills for professional school counselors, school counseling supervisors, and evaluation strategies, and training and supervision strategies will be addressed, with a special emphasis on preventative and culturally sound interventions.

CNS ED 7770 Doctoral Practicum: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Doctoral Standing. One hundred clock hours of on-campus doctoral-level supervised counseling practice. Students will counsel clients and will be introduced to teaching and supervising beginning counseling trainees in a clinical context. As a prerequisite to the Doctoral Internship, students will be expected to demonstrate competence in skills required of counselor educators and clinical supervisors. Students will receive 1.5 hours of group and 1 hour of individual supervision by a graduate faculty member.

CNS ED 7780 Doctoral Internship: 1-6 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 7770; ED REM 7771; ED REM 7781. A 100-hour field experience for each semester-credit hour of enrollment under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students provide conseling services to clients at field sites, teach and supervise beginning counseling trainees, and conduct clinical research projects. Students are supervised by a graduate faculty member in two hours per week of group supervision, and they receive one hour per week of individual supervision by the field site supervisor.

CNS ED 7806 Practicum In Group Counseling: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CNS ED 7804 and doctoral standing or instructor permission Students will lead or co-lead a supervised counseling group in the community.

Educational Psychology Courses

ED PSY 2212 Child and Adolescent Development: 3 semester hours

Studies physical, emotional, social, and cognitive factors of growth and development of children from birth through adolescence. Major theories of learning and development are examined. Additional attention is given to understanding individual differences and the important influences of family and culture on development.

ED PSY 3312 Psychology of Learning, Instruction, and Assessment: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ED PSY 2212 or consent of instructor. Application of educational psychology theories and research to learning, instruction, and assessment. Highlights the importance of motivation, memory and cognition, and critical thinking skills in the instructional process and how to develop and monitor effective assessments to improve student learning.

ED PSY 6030 Instruction, Learning and Assessment: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate School. Reviews cognitive theories and research to examine how teachers can improve the design of classroom instruction, including the development of units, lesson plans, and assessment strategies. Students will critically evaluate current educational practices, design appropriate assessments based on instructional goals, and assess their own professional development as teachers.

ED PSY 6030A Instruction, Learning and Assessment: A: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Covers the study of cognitive and sociocultural theories of learning, knowledge versus understanding, designing for transfer, distinctions between experts and novices within a knowledge domain, and the backward design approach to instructional planning.

ED PSY 6030B Instruction, Learning and Assessment: B: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: ED PSY 6030A or consent of instructor. Builds upon the backward design approach to instructional planning via study of subject matter domains to identify big ideas, essential questions, and facets of understanding. The relationships among domain concepts and development of valid and reliable assessments of student learning are highlighted.

ED PSY 6030C Instruction, Learning and Assessment: C: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: ED PSY 6030B or consent of instructor. Examines the perspectives and intersection of cognitive and sociocultural learning environments, including the appropriate use of technology, application of instructional design principles, and techniques for teaching with high quality curricular materials.

ED PSY 6109 Learning and Development in Secondary School Settings: 4 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and admission to the secondary teacher education program. Investigation of teaching and learning theories and research on the developmental needs of pre-adolescent and adolescent students. Issues of cognition, moral and social development, motivation, and assessment will be analyzed and debated. Emphasis will be on theoretical and practical approaches to constructing and analyzing a learning system. Includes field experiences.

ED PSY 6111 Psychology of Education: 3 semester hours

Current psychological theories and research that guide inquiry and decision making in education. Topics surveyed include behavior, development, learning, instruction.

ED PSY 6113 Psychopathology and Diagnosis: 3 semester hours

Same as CNS ED 6070. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Covers etiology, assessment and diagnosis of mental disorders using contemporary diagnostic systems. Course materials and assignments address the dynamics of adjustment and treatment implications for counselors, school psychologists, and others in the helping professions.

ED PSY 6115 Personality and Social Development: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. A foundational course integrating major theoretical perspectives on personality and social development. Emphasis is on the dynamic interplay of sociocultural influences on personality and identity development, including the impact of social contexts such as the school on development.

ED PSY 6210 Life-Span: Individual and Family Development: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Critical analyses of theories of human development including readings from empirical research and cross-cultural comparisons focusing on strategies to enhance developmental outcomes through relationship and environmental opportunity.

ED PSY 6215 Psychology Of Early Childhood Development: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED PSY 6111 or consent of instructor. A survey of the theories, concepts and research which inform the field of early childhood development and help caregivers and teachers understand the cognitive, social, and emotional changes that take place from birth through the primary years of schooling.

ED PSY 6217 Foundations of Citizenship Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Introduction to citizenship education providing a range of knowledge of civic participation, concepts of democracy, the democratic purposes of education, and the developmental of civic identity and political thinking, attitudes, and engagement. Comparison of historical and contemporary approaches to democratic citizenship education in the United States.

ED PSY 6220 Development of School-Age Students: 2 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Examines theories and concepts regarding the physical, cognitive, social-emotional, and moral development of school-age students. Particular attention is given to the influences of individual and cultural diversity on development.

ED PSY 6222 Advanced Studies in Child and Adolescent Development: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Investigates current psychological theories and research regarding the physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development of children and adolescents.

ED PSY 6225 The Psychology of Adolescence: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED PSY 6111 or consent of instructor. Current research on the psychological changes which occur during adolescence. Attention is paid to the family, school, peer groups, and contemporary settings that practitioners must understand to help young people meet the psychosocial challenges of adolescence.

ED PSY 6310 Psychology of Learning Processes: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED PSY 6111. Advanced study of learning and instructional theories. The historical and theoretical bases of instructional practice are examined.

ED PSY 6404 Seminar: 1-10 semester hours

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ED PSY 6417 Current Perspectives on Citizenship Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ED PSY 6217. Seminar extends students' understanding of theory and research in citizenship education by applying it to practical programs in the US and abroad. Analysis of assumptions underlying methods of citizenship education and its goals. Exploration of research on methods that promote, facilitate, or inhibit civic participation and citizenship competence.

ED PSY 6444 Cognition and Technology: 3 semester hours

Same as ED TECH 6444. Prerequisites: ED PSY 6111 or consent of instructor. Examines cognitive theories and computer-based tools for learning. Students will gain a critical understanding of the relationship between the design of technological tools, the use of those tools in educational settings, and their implications for learning.

ED PSY 6445 Character Education and Development: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED PSY 6111 and ED PSY 6220 or ED PSY 6225. Critical survey of theories of character development and models for character education in childhood and adolescence. Includes empirical and conceptual study of the nature of moral character how it develops, and how it can be fostered in schools.

ED PSY 6448 Technology-Supported Inquiry Learning: 3 semester hours

Same as ED TECH 6448. Prerequisites: ED TECH 5340 and ED PSY 6310 or consent of Instructor. Educational technology such as networked computers and software can play a supportive role in inquiry-based learning. Students will explore the theoretical background, design issues, pragmatic realities of technology-supported inquiry learning environments. Such learning environments are best understood as systems involving social, cultural, material and psychological aspects. Consideration will be given to the important properties of settings, activities and technologies, as well as to the role of instructors.

ED PSY 6450 Advanced Methods in Character Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED PSY 6445. Advanced exploration of methods for promoting character development in schools: class meetings, democratic processes, cross-age learning and character curiculum development. Methods will be critically examined for their empirical and theoretical justifications.

ED PSY 6497 Problems: 1-10 semester hours

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ED PSY 6530 Foundations of School Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admission to the School Psychology Program or consent of instructor. Examines the professional roles, responsibilities, and functions of psychologists in schools. Focuses on educational foundations of school psychology including the history of the profession, organization and operation of schools, and diversity among students and their families.

ED PSY 6532 Psychoeducational Differences: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Examination of classification systems used with children and adolescents in the diagnosis and treatment of educational and physical disabilities, mental disorders, and other developmental challenges.

ED PSY 6536 Biological Bases of Behavior: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Examination of biological factors affecting human behavior. Includes an overview of neuroscience, developmental psychophysiology, and basic psychopharmacology. Implications for psychological and educational interventions are considered.

ED PSY 6540 Psychoeducational Interventions: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Grades of B- or better in ED PSY 6545 and ED REM 6718; or consent of instructor. Examines academic and instructional interventions, both preventive and remedial, that are delivered in schools and related settings with children and adolescents. Emphasizes linking assessment and intervention via use of direct and indirect service delivery.

ED PSY 6542 Social-Emotional and Behavior Interventions: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Grades of B- or better in SPEC ED 6325 and ED PSY 6545 or consent of instructor. Provides instruction and practice in the use of the problem-solving model to address common social-emotional and behavior problems found in schools. Special emphasis is given to research-based, early intervention and targeted intervention techniques that improve student behavior. Concurrent placement in a school or related setting is necessary to complete course assignments.

ED PSY 6545 Consultation in Schools and Related Settings: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admission to the School Psychology or Special Education Program, or consent of instructor. Examines the theories, research, and legal/ethical issues related to consultation in schools and related settings. Emphasis on understanding he process of consultation using a problem-solving approach. Includes instruction in interviewing, observation, and development and evaluation of interventions.

ED PSY 6550 Professional Issues in School Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Grade of B- or better in ED PSY 6530 or consent of instructor. Advanced examination of professional issues - specifically the legal, ethical, and cultural factors - that influence the practice of school psychology.

ED PSY 6590 School Psychology Practicum I: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Grades of B- or better in ED PSY 6550 and ED REM 6718. Introductory supervised experience in psychoeducational assessment and interventions for academic and behavior problems in schools and related settings. Settings and responsibilities determined in consultation with program faculty and site supervisor.

ED PSY 6591 School Psychology Practicum II: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Grade of B- or better in ED PSY 6590. Advanced supervised experience in consultation, problem solving, psychoeducational assessment and interventions for academic and behavior problems in schools and related settings. Settings and responsibilities determined in consultation with program faculty and site supervisor.

ED PSY 6598 School Psychology Internship I: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Grade of B- or better in ED PSY 6591. Supervised field-based placement in an approved school or educational setting under the supervision of an appropriately credentialed school psychologist. Course is eligible for graduate equivalency credit.

ED PSY 6599 School Psychology Internship II: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Grade of B- or better in ED PSY 6598. Advanced supervised field-based placement in an approved school or educational setting under the supervision of an appropriately credentialed school psychologist. Course is eligible for graduate equivalency credit.

ED PSY 6990 Internship: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Closely supervised experience in a field setting under the direction of a graduate faculty member. An appropriate level of competence and evidence of growth must be demonstrated by the intern. The internship will include planning, research, evaluation, and related professional activities.

ED PSY 7210 Theories of Development and the Life Course: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Doctoral standing and at least one course in human development (e.g., ED PSY 6210 or ED PSY 6225), or consent of instructor. This advanced course examines the historical, ecological, cultural, and individual factors that shape developmental and educational experiences. Diverse families and their trajectories will be highlighted to demonstrate the intersecting spheres that shape human development. Students will critique research from multiple disciplines, analyze policy issues, and design a study to deepen their understanding of traditional and current theories on the life course.

ED PSY 7640 Changing Perspectives in Educational Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Doctoral Student Standing or consent of instructor The advanced exploration of foundational issues in educational psychology. Topics include theoretical perspectives on modes of analysis used in the investigation of psychological theories and concepts in education.

Educational Research And Evaluation Method Courses

ED REM 3721 Psychoeducational Assessment and Evaluation: 3 semester hours

Review of measurement concepts and use of psychoeducational assessment data gathered via interview, observation, norm-referenced, and curriculum-based assessment methods. Special emphasis on progress monitoring and data-based decision making.

ED REM 4730 Program Assessment and Evaluation: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: EDUC 3170 or consent of instructor. This course reviews the theories and methods of program-level assessment and evaluation used to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of programs. Special attention is given to the various types of evaluations, data collection methods, evaluation strategies and methodology, and applications.

ED REM 6497 Problems: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisite: At least one previous ED REM course and consent of course supervisor. Individual study on topics pertaining to educational measurement, evaluation, statistics and research design.

ED REM 6707 Classroom Measurement and Evaluation: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate admission or consent of instructor. An introductory graduate course to classroom testing and evaluation. Topic areas include comparison of criterion-and norm-referenced theory and technique; classical test theory, reliability, validity, and associated descriptive statistics; derived and transformed scores; preparation of instructional objectives for use in developing the classroom test, performance evaluations, and portfolio rubrics; use of evaluation to assess student achievement and instructional effectiveness.

ED REM 6710 Educational Research Methods and Design: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: An introductory statistics course or an introductory research design course; or consent of instructor. Covers educational research methodology: comparison of various types of qualitative and quantitative educational research, threats to internal/external validity, sampling methods, data analyses, and components of research reports.

ED REM 6716 Academic Assessment and Intervention: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Provides instruction in measurement concepts, interpretation of cognitive ability tests, and use of norm-referenced and curriculum-based assessment techniques in developing academic interventions. Special attention is given to data-based decision making and the links among instruction, assessment, and intervention.

ED REM 6718 Psychoeducational Assessment and Intervention: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Grade of B- or better in ED PSY 6530 or CNS ED 6050, or consent of instructor. Reviews measurement concepts and covers administration, scoring, interpretation, and reporting of individually administered tests of academic and cognitive abilities. Special attention is given to the link between assessment and intervention.

ED REM 6719 Advanced Psychoeducational Assessment and Intervention: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Grade of B- or better in ED REM 6718 or consent of instructor. Instruction is provided in advanced and specialized assessment, diagnostic, and intervention techniques for individuals with intellectual disabilities, emotional or behavior disorders, and other low incidence disabilities experienced by children and youth.

ED REM 6730 Educational Program Evaluation: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED REM 6710 or ED REM 6750; or consent of instructor. Covers principles and procedures for developing and assessing the quality and effectiveness of programs, projects, and materials related to planned interventions and system changes in educational settings.

ED REM 6732 Advanced Theory and Practice in Educational Program Evaluation: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED REM 6730 or consent of the instructor. Extension of the principles, attributes, and practice of program evaluation to contemporary problems and settings. Study will include the comparison of examples of the program evaluation process. Focus will be on adherence to the Program Evaluation Standards endorsed by leading professional research and evaluation associations.

ED REM 6735 Statistical Analysis for Education Research: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Provides students with a fundamental intermediate understanding of quantitative methods and their relationship to social science research in education. This course is designed to provide statistical background to students who will pursue advanced degrees in education. Students will conduct lab data analysis based on the topics covered in the class and learn how to generate specific research questions and conduct basic statistical analysis.

ED REM 6750 Advanced Research Design in Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED REM 6735 or consent of instructor. Course is designed to provide students with a thorough background in the fundamental principles of research design in education, and the knowledge and skills necessary to design and carry out studies appropriate to a wide variety of research problems. It focuses on tailoring the research design and methodology to most effectively address the problem or issue of concern, including qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method designs. This is an experiential course designed around active discussion by students each week, and requires each student to develop a detailed research proposal for conducting a study to examine an appropriate educational research problem.

ED REM 6990 Internship: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Closely supervised experience in a field setting under the direction of a graduate faculty member. An appropriate level of competence and evidence of growth in the professional role must be demonstrated by the intern. The internship will include planning, research, evaluation, and related professional activities.

ED REM 7712 Discourse Analysis in Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. The role of language in social life is of paramount concern to educational researchers. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to theories and methods of discourse analysis. Students will become familiar with the methods used in conversation analysis, critical discourse analysis and mediated or multimodal discourse analysis. Topics include transcription theory and practice, the role of context in discourse analysis, the ethics of representation and the place of action in discourse analysis. Students will engage with the theories and methods for analyzing educational interactions such as small-group discussions, education documents, classroom scenes, in-depth interviews, and naturally occurring conversations.

ED REM 7740 Historical Research Methods in Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Doctoral Standing. Survey of the methodology of historical research in education and historical writing about educational issues. Specific topics will include the historiography of education; working with primary and secondary documents; oral history as method and documentation; quantitative approaches to history; constructing historical narratives; and the question of interpretation.

ED REM 7771 Quantitative Research Methods I: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED REM 6735 and ED REM 6750 or consent of instructor. A second course in advanced Educational research methods sequence, with focus on multiple regression analysis and its applications to educational and psychological research.

ED REM 7772 Quantitative Research Methods II: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED REM 7771 or consent of instructor. An advanced educational research methods course: multivariate analysis of variance, canonical correlation, discriminant function analysis, factor analysis, cluster analysis, advanced topics in multiple linear regression; and associated research design issues.

ED REM 7773 Quantitative Research Methods III: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED REM 7772. An advanced educational research methods course using multiple linear regression models, path analysis, and structural equation modeling. Focus is on the theory, issues and application of these advanced data analysis techniques.

ED REM 7781 Qualitative Methods in Educational Research I: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED REM 6750 or consent of instructor. An introductory qualitative research methods course in education to develop skill in forming research questions, writing field notes, and collecting, organizing, and analyzing a variety of data. The design issues of triangulation subjectivity, and trustworthiness are explored. Ethics and ethical issues in qualitative research are presented.

ED REM 7782 Qualitative Methods in Educational Research II: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED REM 7781 or consent of instructor An advanced qualitative educational research methods course to address the issues of sampling strategies, observational and interview techniques, questionnaire construction, and data analysis. Requires access to a field setting to conduct a qualitative research study.

Educational Technology Courses

ED TECH 2230 Information Literacy: 3 semester hours

Students will analyze and evaluate multiple sources of information using modern technology to research, retrieve, synthesize, construct and present information for academic disciplines. The course will assist students in the development of educational technology skills that allow for specialization in their chosen major.

ED TECH 3135 Technology for Educators: 1 semester hour

This course will instruct teacher candidates in the use of digital tools in education. Candidates will develop strategies for incorporating current technology developments and social media in educational practice.

ED TECH 4302 Educational Technology Instruction in Educational Agencies: 3 semester hours

The course focuses on how computers and the internet have changed teaching and learning; how educators can facilitate inquiry-based learning, and on the design and implementation of technology-rich activities and projects. Practices to be explored include making presentations; searching for information and educational resources; organizing, writing, and displaying information and data. Students may not receive credit for both ED TECH 4302 and ED TECH 5301.

ED TECH 4436 Computer-Mediated Teaching and Learning in Education: 3 semester hours

Explores the theory, research, and practice of using computer-mediated communication and computer-supported collaborative learning in education. Education could be formal or informal, in an institutional setting or not. Students will get experience with several different technologies during the semester.

ED TECH 4558 Computer Ethics for Educators: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior or above; or consent of instructor. Examination of ethical issues concerning the use of computers generally, their use in education, and the engineering of particular computer technologies. Aims at developing awareness of these issues and skills for ethical decision-making regarding them through careful, analytical methods. Typical issues include privacy, intellectual property, computer fraud, the possibility of artificial agents, and others. Available for graduate credit.

ED TECH 5301 Introduction To Computers and the Internet in Education: 3 semester hours

The course focuses on how computers and the internet have changed teaching and learning; how teachers can facilitate learning in inquiry-based, technology-rich classrooms; and on the design and implementation of technology-rich activities and projects. Introduces students to the networked computer as an instructional tool. Course participants will be introduced to how teachers and their students can use computer tools in appropriate ways for different contect areas and educational levels. Practices to be explored include making presentations; searching for information and educational resources; organizing writing, and displaying information and data.

ED TECH 5340 Selection and Utilization of Educational Multimedia: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED TECH 5301 or consent of instructor. Prepares students for selecting and utilizing multimedia technologies for learning. Students will conduct projects involving educational multimedia programs available on computers or over telecommunications networks. The projects will incorporate graphics, sound, and video. The goal of working on these projects is to prepare students to facilitate others' use of multimedia in classrooms and other educational contexts.

ED TECH 6135 Technology for Preparing Inquiry-Based Teaching: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. This course instructs teacher candidates in the use of digital tools in their teaching practice. Candidates develop strategies for incorporating current technology developments and social media in educational practice. Technology for educators challenges the candidates to think about the underlying principles, terms, and concepts of educational technology. Students are introduced to the different methods teachers can use to integrate technology into classroom instruction for varying grade levels and content areas. Activities undertaken in this course include learning about educational technology tools and applying some of them to create the academic instructional materials through interactive collaboration.

ED TECH 6404 Seminar: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED TECH 5340 or consent of instructor. Seminar in educational technology addressing special issues and topics not normally included in the regular educational technology courses.

ED TECH 6416 Teaching and Learning With Technology: Graphical Representational Tools: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED TECH 5340 or consent of instructor. Examines how graphical representation tools can be used to enhance teaching and learning. Students will learn about techniques for visualizing and organizing information and data in science, math, the social sciences, and humanities, and will become familiar with research and practice pertaining to their use in a variety of learning activities and projects.

ED TECH 6434 Technology and Privilege: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Covers issues relating to the digital divide in schools and the society. The focus will be on technology in education with an emphasis on the ways that policies and practices perpetuate the divide. To examine this phenomenon, Critical Race Theory (CRT) will be one lens to examine the inequality.

ED TECH 6435 Instructional Technology and Education Reform: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED TECH 5340 or consent of instructor. Students will learn how to foster changes in uses of technology for learning in schools, based on a historical understanding of previous technology reforms, and a critical assessment of recent reforms. Questions addressed included: What did stakeholders predict and hope for with earlier educational technologies, early uses of the computer and networking, and present technological innovations? What actually happened? Why? How can teachers and other educators help foster and spread effective use of technology for learning?.

ED TECH 6436 Computer-Mediated Communication in Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED TECH 5340 or consent of instructor. Explores the theory, research, and practice of using computermediated communication and computer-supported collaborative learning in education. Learning environments including elementary, secondary, higher, and adult education will be considered.

ED TECH 6437 Distance Learning Via Networks and Telecommunications: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. The course is an investigation in the ways that learning and teaching across the barriers of time and distance are similar to and different from face to face learning and teaching. Students will study the influence of interactive media: videoconferencing, asynchronous discussions and other commonly used methods.

ED TECH 6444 Cognition and Technology: 3 semester hours

Same as ED PSY 6444. Prerequisites: ED PSY 6111 or consent of instructor. Examines cognitive theories and computer-based tools for learning. Students will gain a critical understanding of the relationship between the design of technological tools, the use of those tools in educational settings, and their implications for learning.

ED TECH 6448 Technology-Supported Inquiry Learning: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED TECH 5340 and ED PSY 6310 or consent of instructor. Educational technology such as networked computers and software can play a supportive role in inquiry-based learning. Students will explore the theoretical background, design issues, and pragmatic realities of technology-supported inquiry learning environments. Such learning environments are best understood as systems involving social, cultural, material and psychological aspects. Consideration will be given to the important properties of settings, activities and technologies, as well as the role of instructors.

ED TECH 6449 Using Technology in Administration Processes: 3 semester hours

Same as ED ADM 6449. Prerequisites: A course in measurement, statistics or evaluation, or consent of instructor. The course will explore how the use of data analysis with technology can be applied in the administration of schools or other work settings. Administrators will explore software tools and their implications for making decisions. A case study will be completed on the implementation of a technology in a school or other appropriate setting.

ED TECH 6452 Educational Multimedia Design: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ED TECH 5340 or consent of instructor. Examines principles and techniques for the design of visually and functionally effective multimedia educational resources. Emphasis will be placed on techniques for the computer-based production of materials incorporating text, graphics, and video Rapid prototyping and evaluation techniques will be incorporated.

ED TECH 6454 Instructional Video Production: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED TECH 5340 or consent of instructor. Elements of digital video production will be studied and used to produce video for a variety of formats. Students will develop the skill to produce and stream programs for school news programs, video annuals, documentaries and staff development programs.

ED TECH 6460 Technology Coordination in Schools: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ED TECH 5340, ED TECH 6444, and ED TECH 6448 or consent of instructor. The course provides theoretical and practical knowledge for implementing technology in schools. A major focus will be placed on analyzing the total cost of implementations and methods for measuring educational success.

ED TECH 6490 Internship: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Closely supervised experience in a field setting under the direction of a graduate faculty member. An appropriate level of competence and evidence of growth in the professional role must be demonstrated by the intern. The internship will include planning, research, evaluation, and related professional activities.

ED TECH 6497 Problems: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisite: ED TECH 5340 or consent of instructor. Individual study on topics pertaining to educational technology.

ED TECH 7070 Higher Education and Technology: Theory and Practice: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Doctoral standing or consent of instructor. Students explore recent research of classical learning theories and pedagogy in order to incorporate advanced technology. Students apply both theory and practice to develop and present lesson modules that explore research in this area, and illustrate the use of technology in teaching. Detailed constructive criticism is used with the presentations.

Higher Education Courses

HIGHERED 5401 Current Issues in Higher Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate admission. Familiarizes student with nature and characteristics of American higher education. Students learn about the structure of higher education, the roles played by the various constituencies, and current issues.

HIGHERED 5402 Student Affairs Administration: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate Admission. A survey course in student personnel administration with an emphasis on understanding the college student and on learning ways to meet both his/her academic and nonacademic needs.

HIGHERED 6404 Seminar: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIGHERED 6405 Financial Issues in Higher Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Provides an overview of the state/federal funding mechanisms for higher education in the U.S. Addresses practices in budgeting at various types of postsecondary institutions.

HIGHERED 6406 Governance of Higher Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate admission. Concentrates on the study of the unique system of governance in higher education, including faculty, instructional, system, and state governing mechanisms.

HIGHERED 6408 Legal Issues in Student Affairs: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. Provides an exploration of the legal and philosophical principles that guide decision-making in higher education institutions and the courts. It also includes a detailed, in-depth analysis of legal cases that have an impact on students in private and public two- and four-year colleges and universities in the United States.

HIGHERED 6409 Critical Issues in Student Affairs: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Explores the historical development and foundational theories of the student affairs profession. This course also explores the organization and management of programs and services, the formulation of policies that guide student personnel service programs, and the integration of program elements, research, current problems and trends.

HIGHERED 6410 Ethics in Higher Education Administration: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Students will examine the historical philosophical foundations of ethics and their implications for faculty, staff and students in the academic workplace.

HIGHERED 6422 Policy Analysis of Higher Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate admission. Introduces students to the analysis of higher education public policy. Includes state and local policy analysis and examination of legislative history of major federal higher education laws.

HIGHERED 6430 The Community College: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Admission. The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the two-year college - its past, present and future. Examines history, operations, funding, internal constituents, curricular mission, societal role, and current issues.

HIGHERED 6431 Community College Leadership: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate Admission. Introduces students to leadership theory and practice and the literature of leadership development. Applies theory and practice to the unique role of the leader in community colleges, including the community college presidency. Particular emphasis is given to the diverse roles expected of the successful leader in today's community college.

HIGHERED 6432 Current Issues in Community College Education: 3 semester hours

A review and analysis of current issues affecting community college students, instruction, administration, policy and community relations. HIGHERED 6430, The Community College, is recommended before taking this course for those not currently working in community college settings.

HIGHERED 6440 Issues in Institutional Research I: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Provides a history and overview of institutional research in postsecondary education. Other areas of interest include student issues, student outcomes, higher education funding, productivity funding, and legal issues.

HIGHERED 6441 Issues in Institutional Research II: 3 semester hours

This course provides the study of key issues in institutional research, including faculty workload and salary, program assessment, fact books, peer institutions, national databases, and strategic planning.

HIGHERED 6473 Curriculum in Higher Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. The development, implementation, and assessment of curriculum in higher education as well as historical and philosophical perspectives; major figures and emerging trends are included.

HIGHERED 6474 The College Student: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. A comprehensive overview of the theories and research related to college and university student development. Particular attention is given to student demographics, patterns of growth and development, and attitudinal changes.

HIGHERED 6476 Organization and Administration of Higher Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. This course includes the study of missions, governance, and organizational structures of American higher education institutions. Within this context, particular attention is given to administrative roles and responsibilities and issues of leadership.

HIGHERED 6477 History and Philosophy of American Higher Education: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. This course is a systematic study of the historical and philosophical contexts that have conditioned the evolution of American higher education. Particular attention is given to significant events, trends, and movements within American higher education.

HIGHERED 6497 Problems: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

HIGHERED 6900 Internship: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. Closely supervised experience in a field setting under the direction of a graduate faculty member. An appropriate level of competence and evidence of growth in the professional role must be demonstrated by the intern. The internship will included planning, research, evaluation, and related professional activities.

HIGHERED 7800 Higher Education Doctoral Seminar: 1-6 semester hours

Prerequisites: Doctoral standing or consent of instructor. Intensive directed study of selected issues related to the administration of higher education institutions.

Donald A. Gouwens
Clinical Associate Professor and Chair
Psy.D., Central Michigan University

Mark Pope
Curators' Professor
Ed.D, University of San Francisco

Theresa G. Coble
E. Desmond Lee Endowed Prof. Experiential & Family Education
Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Keith Miller
Orthwein Endowed Professor for Life Long Learning in the Sciences and Professor
Ph.D., University of Iowa

Carl Hoagland
Emerson Electric Company Professor in Technology and Learning
Ed.D., University of Massachusetts

Wolfgang Althof
Theresa Fischer Endowed Professor of Citizenship Education and Carl-Von-Ossietzky, Dr. Phil, Habil
Dr. Phil., University of Friboourg

R. Rocco Cottone
Professor
Ph.D., St. Louis University

Cody S. Ding
Professor
Ph.D., University of Michigan

E. Paulette Isaac-Savage
Professor and Associate Provost for Planning and Assessment
Ed.D., University of Georgia

Susan Kashubeck-West
Professor
Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Natalie Bolton
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Louisville

Michael W. Bahr
Associate Professor and Director of Academic Programs.
Ph.D., Indiana University

Patricia Boyer
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

Angela D. Coker
Associate Professor
Ph.D., Union Institute and University

Matthew D. Davis
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin

Brian L. Hutchison
Associate Professor
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University

Shawn Woodhouse
Associate Professor and Associate Dean of Students
Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

Emily Brown
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., University of Tennessee

M. Ruth Schumacher-Martinez
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., Loyola University - Chicago

M. Lee Nelson
Teaching Professor
Ph.D., University of Oregon

Emily Oliveira
Assistant Clinical Professor
Ph.D., University of Missouri - St. Louis

Lowe S. MacLean
Vice Chancellor Emeritus
Ed.D., Indiana University-Bloomington

Carole A. Murphy
Professor Emeritus
Ed.D., Texas A&M University

Charles D. Schmitz
Professor Emeritus and Dean Emeritus
Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

William L. Franzen
Professor Emeritus and Dean Emeritus
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin

Joy E. Whitener
Professor Emeritus and Dean Emeritus
Ed.D., Washington University

Therese S. Cristiani
Associate Professor Emeritus
Ed.D., Indiana University

Margaret W. Cohen
Associate Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., Washington University

Thomas Schnell
Associate Professor Emeritus and Dean Emeritus
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University - Carbondale

Wendell L. Smith
Assistant Professor Emeritus and Dean Emeritus
Ph.D., Ohio State University

Clark J. Hickman
Associate Dean Emeritus
Ed.D., University of Missouri-St. Louis