Courses

ENGL 1100 First-Year Writing: 3 semester hours

Integrates critical reading, writing, and thinking skills and studies actual writing practices. Sequenced reading and writing assignments build cumulatively to more complex assignments. Includes formal and informal writing, drafting and revising, editing for correctness, synthesizing source material, and documenting sources accurately. Fulfills 3 hours of the General Education requirement for Communicating Skills. Does not count toward the major in English.

ENGL 1110 First-Year Writing for International Students: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Essay proficiency test or a TOFEL score of 500 or above. Designed for any student whose first language is not English. Integrates critical reading, writing, and thinking skills and studies actual writing practices. Sequenced reading and writing assignments build cumulatively to more complex assignments. Includes formal and informal writing, drafting and revising, editing for correctness, synthesizing source material, and documenting sources accurately. Special attention given to verb tenses, idioms, articles, and syntax. Does not count toward the major in English. Substitutes for ENGL 1100 in all university requirements.

ENGL 1120 Introduction to Literature: 3 semester hours

The student is introduced to the various literary types, including poetry, drama, fiction, and the essay.

ENGL 1170 American Literary Masterpieces: 3 semester hours

An introduction to major authors, works, and themes in American Literature from the nineteenth century to the present.

ENGL 1710 Native American Literature: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 1710. The course surveys the literature of American Indians from its oral tradition of myth, legend, song and oratory through its modern forms. The course satisfies the ethnic literature requirement for Missouri state certification in secondary education and the cultural diversity requirement.

ENGL 1950 Topics in Literature: 3 semester hours

This course will introduce the student to selected literary topics and/or genres. Each semester the department will announce topics and course content. Topics such as alienation, justice, and the absurd, and genres such as science fiction and contemporary drama are typical possibilities.

ENGL 2040 Beginning Fiction Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. An introduction to the writing of fiction and an exploration of contemporary short stories as models for the writer. Students who have taken ENGL 2060 may not take ENGL 2040 for credit. The course counts toward the Certificate in Writing.

ENGL 2080 Advertising Copywriting: 3 semester hours

Same as MEDIA ST 2080. To give students a hands-on approach for writing advertising material for print and broadcast against tight deadlines in a professional setting.

ENGL 2110 Information Literacy: 3 semester hours

Designed especially for humanities and fine arts majors, this course introduces students to the main components of information literacy, including digital, web, and media literacies as well as library databases. Students work with both digital and print materials to find, evaluate, and synthesize information while applying the critical thinking habits of questioning and reasoning. Frequent writing and multimedia assignments will provide practice in using various technologies to assemble and to share information.

ENGL 2120 Topics in Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1110. This course will introduce the student to writing in specific areas. The department will announce topics and course content in the schedule. Possible topics are argumentation, reading and writing about public affairs, sports reporting and writing, and writing about science. A student may repeat the course once when topics are different. The course counts toward the certificate in writing.

ENGL 2160 Introduction to American Studies: 3 semester hours

Same as HIST 2160. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. This course introduces students to the multidisciplinary nature of American Studies and is a required course for those who wish to complete the minor in American Studies. It reviews the discipline from its origins in the 1930s, and it introduces students to St Louis' rich resources for American Studies.

ENGL 2240 Literature of the Old Testament: 3 semester hours

A comprehensive understanding of the Old Testament, its literary background and significance for western civilization.

ENGL 2250 Literature of the New Testament: 3 semester hours

A comprehensive understanding of the New Testament, its literary background and significance for western civilization.

ENGL 2280 Contemporary World Literature: 3 semester hours

Selected World Literature from the 20th and 21st centuries with emphasis on non-European literatures. This course may include works from Europe, Latin American, the Middle East, Africa, and Asia; it excludes literature from the United States and England. It satisfies the cultural diversity requirement of UMSL.

ENGL 2310 English Literature Before 1790: 3 semester hours

The development of English literature from the Middle Ages through the eighteenth century. Introduces students to major literary movements and themes through the reading and analysis of representative works of selected major authors.

ENGL 2320 English Literature After 1790: 3 semester hours

The development of English Literature from the beginning of the nineteenth century. Introduces students to major literary movements and themes through the reading and analysis of representative works of selected major authors.

ENGL 2330 Introduction to Poetry: 3 semester hours

A close study of poems, with special emphasis on the varieties of poetic form, and the means of interpretation and evaluation.

ENGL 2340 Introduction to Drama: 3 semester hours

A close study of major dramatic works in various modes, to introduce the student to the forms and techniques of dramatic literature.

ENGL 2350 Introduction to Fiction: 3 semester hours

A close study of major prose fiction, with particular attention to the varieties of fictional forms and techniques.

ENGL 2510 World Literature Before 1650: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ENGL 1100. A survey of World Literature from the earliest times to 1650. Diverse literary works in a variety genres and voices will be studied. This course excludes literature from the United States and England. To satisfy the cultural diversity requirement of UMSL, the course will include literary works from diverse traditions from throughout the world.

ENGL 2520 World Literature After 1650: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100. A survey of World Literature from 1650 to the present. Diverse literary works in a variety genres and voices will be studied. This course excludes literature from the United States and England. To satisfy the cultural diversity requirement of UMSL, the course will include literary works from diverse traditions from throughout the world.

ENGL 2710 American Literature Before 1865: 3 semester hours

Representative selections from American authors from the early seventeenth century to the Civil War.

ENGL 2720 American Literature After 1865: 3 semester hours

Representative selections from American authors from the Civil War to the present.

ENGL 2810 Traditional Grammar: 3 semester hours

An introduction to the terms and concepts of traditional grammar, beginning with functions of the noun and forms of the verb in simple sentences, moving to more complex structures such as subordinate clauses and verbal phrases, and ending with the application of this material to issues of Standard English.

ENGL 3030 Poetry Writing Workshop: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ENGL 1100 or the equivalent or consent of instructor. Workshop in poetry writing that may also focus on close reading of published works and poetic forms. May be repeated once for a total of 6 credit hours. Counts toward the Certificate in Creative Writing, and if taken twice, the second time counts toward the Emphasis in Creative Writing for English majors.

ENGL 3040 Fiction Writing Workshop: Narrative Techniques: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ENGL 2040 or ENGL 2060 or the equivalent or consent of instructor. Workshop in fiction writing. The course counts toward the Certificate in Writing.

ENGL 3090 Writing about Literature: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 Or Equivalent (3-6 credit hours) and 56 credit hours. Acquaints students with the basic methods of literary criticism and trains them in explicating particular texts and writing about literature. Introduces students to basic research and proper MLA documentation. Required of all English majors. Does not count toward the major in English. May not be taken on satisfactory/unsatisfactory option. Counts toward the Certificate in Writing.

ENGL 3100 Junior-Level Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent (3-6 credit hours) and 56 credit hours. Focuses on writing and literacies in various contexts. Builds on intellectual maturity, knowledge, and abilities gained through prior university studies. Enhances analytical, communicative, persuasive, and explanatory capabilities. Includes complex readings and research. Fulfills the university's requirement for a junior-level course in Communicative Skills. Counts toward the Certificate in Writing. May not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

ENGL 3110 Junior Level Writing for International Students: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1110 or equivalent (3-6 credit hours) and 56 credit hours. Designed for any student whose first language is not English. Builds on intellectual maturity, knowledge, and abilities gained through prior university studies. Enhances analytical, communicative, persuasive, and explanatory capabilities in contemporary American English. Includes formal research and documentation methods from a variety of fields. Emphasizes students' reading abilities, both comprehension and vocabulary. Fulfills the university's requirement for a junior-level course in Communicative Skills. Counts toward the Certificate in Writing. May not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

ENGL 3120 Business Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent (3-6 hours) and junior standing. This course further develops the experienced writer's style and analytical capabilities to the level of sophistication necessary for upper-division writing assignments and for business and professional settings. Writing assignments may include business correspondence, reports, resumes, proposals, analyses, feasibility studies, and articles for in-house publications. The course emphasizes clarity, consciseness, organization, format, style, tone and mechanical correctness; expands upon students' research and documentation skills; and requires research in university libraries. Fulfills the University's requirement for a junior-level course in communicative skills. It may not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

ENGL 3130 Technical Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ENGL 1100 or equivalent (3-6 hours) and junior standing. The major elements of industrial technical writing. Writing assignments include technical definitions, abstracts and summaries, mechanism descriptions, instructions, process analyses, technical reports and proposals. Emphasis is placed on clarity , conciseness, organization, format, style and tone. The course includes an introduction to research methods and documentation. All readings are selected from industrial material. Fulfills the University requirement for junior-level course in communicative skills, subject to the approval of the student's major department. May not be taken on the satisfactory/unsatisfactory option.

ENGL 3150 Feature Writing: 3 semester hours

Same as MEDIA ST 3150. Prerequisite: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. Study of freelance and staff-written magazine or newspaper feature articles. Emphasis on relationship between types of publication and article content, research methods, and writing style. Frequent short assignments -- journal entries, interviews, library projects, article critiques, and market reports -- lead to production of full-length feature articles. May not be taken on the S/U option. The course counts toward the Certificate in Writing.

ENGL 3160 Writing in the Sciences: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent (3-6 hours) and junior standing Designed to teach students how to write effectively in the sciences. Writing assignments include short reports, proposals and a major project. Students are encouraged to select projects that will reflect work in a science course which may include a research or analytical report, a formal proposal or a procedures/instructions manual. Emphasis is placed on clarity, conciseness, organization, format, style, and tone. The course will include an introduction to research methods and documentation. Fulfills the University requirement for a junior-level course in communicative skills, subject to the approval of the student's major department. May not be taken on the satisfactory/unsatisfactory option.

ENGL 3180 Reporting: 3 semester hours

Same as MEDIA ST 3180. Prerequisite: ENGL 3140 or equivalent. Theory and practice of reporting news for publication in the print media. Includes one classroom session and one field assignment weekly. Stories must be filed within deadline limits. Writing emphasis is on clarity, conciseness, and accuracy. The course counts toward the certificate in writing.

ENGL 3280 Public Relations Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ENGL 3100 or equivalent. An introduction to the process of planning, producing, and evaluating written public relations messages. Writing assignments includemedia releases. letters, memos, position papers, background papers, brochures, and reports and proposals.

ENGL 3500 Special Studies: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisite: A course in area of proposed work and consent of instructor. Individual work, with conferences adjusted to needs of the student. May not be used to meet specific English department distribution and language requirements. May be repeated for a maximum total of four hours credit.

ENGL 3800 Topics in Women and Literature: 3 semester hours

An examination of the role of women in literature, either as figures in literary works or as writers. Specific topics to vary from semester to semester. Since the topics of ENGL 3800 may change each semester, the course may be repeated for credit if the topics are substantially different.

ENGL 4030 Contemporary Critical Theory: 3 semester hours

This course is to acquaint students with a range of critical methodologies that have gained currency since the 1960's; topics may include formalist, structuralist, post-structuralist, Marxist, reader-response, psychoanalytic, feminist, cognitive, and evolutionary approaches to literature and culture.

ENGL 4060 Adolescent Literature: 3 semester hours

The course will expose students to the large variety of quality adolescent literature available for reading and study in middle and high school classes. It will also examine the relevance of a variety of issues to the reading and teaching of adolescent literature, among them: reader response; theory and practice; multi-culturalism; literacy; the relation of adolescent literature to "classic" literature the role of adolescent literature in interdisciplinary studies; adolescent literature as an incentive to extracurricular reading.

ENGL 4080 Narrative, Cognition, and Emotion: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 2320; ENGL 3090, prerequisite or co-requisite. Examines narrative theory in the light of recent research into cognitive organization and the structure of the emotions. Traditional and contemporary theories of narrative--or realism, symbolism, point of view, tone, and genre--are developed through recent findings in empirical science. A variety of stories and novels are used as test cases for theoretical propositions.

ENGL 4130 Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent; ENGL 2030 or ENGL 3030 or consent of instructor. Advanced workshop in poetry writing. The course counts toward the Certificate in Writing.

ENGL 4140 Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent; ENGL 2040 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Advanced workshop in fiction writing. The course counts toward the certificate in Writing.

ENGL 4160 Special Topics in Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent. Special topics in writing that are not covered in other 4000level English courses. Since the topics of ENGL 4160 may change each semester, the course may be repeated for credit if the topics are substantially different.

ENGL 4260 Chaucer: 3 semester hours

The course concentrates on the poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer, including the Canterbury Tales, early poetic works, and the Troilus and Criseyde. All readings are in the original Middle English.

ENGL 4320 Sixteenth-Century Poetry and Prose: 3 semester hours

A broad selection of writers from the late 15th century through 1603, including Thomas More, the Sidneys, Spenser, and Shakespeare's sonnets.

ENGL 4340 Early Seventeenth Century Poetry and Prose: 3 semester hours

A broad selection of writers from 1603 through 1675, exclusive of Milton, including Bacon, Donne, Jonson, and Lanyer.

ENGL 4350 Milton: 3 semester hours

All the minor poems and the three longer poems with some attention to the major prose, Milton and his relation to the politics, theology and literature of the seventeenth century.

ENGL 4360 Tudor and Stuart Drama: 3 semester hours

A survey of the dramatic writings of the period from the interludes of John Heywood to the closing of the theatres in 1642, with particular attention to the plays of Marlowe, Jonson, Webster and Ford. Though Shakespeare will not be studied in this course; connections between his works and those of his contemporaries will be discussed.

ENGL 4370 Shakespeare: Tragedies and Romances: 3 semester hours

A study of the structure and language of Shakespeare's tragedies and romances, with particular attention to their genre as well as their relation to the cultural issues of Shakespeare's time. Shakespeare's narrative poems may also be included.

ENGL 4380 Shakespeare: Comedies and Histories: 3 semester hours

A study of the structure and language of Shakespeare's comedies and histories, with particular attention to their genre as well as their relation to the culture issues of Shakespeare's time. Shakespeare's sonnets may also be included.

ENGL 4420 Age Of Dryden And Pope: 3 semester hours

The beginnings of English neo-classic literature in the Restoration and its development through the first half of the eighteenth century, focusing on Dryden, Swift and Pope.

ENGL 4450 The Eighteenth-Century English Novel: 3 semester hours

The origins and early development of the English novel, from Defoe to Jane Austen.

ENGL 4520 Romantic Poetry and Prose: 3 semester hours

A broad selection of poetry and prose from the English Romantic movement. Primary focus on Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, and Shelley. Additional authors may include Mary Wollstonecraft, Robert Burns, Thomas De Quincey, Mary Shelley, John Clare, Felicia Hemans, Ottobah Cugoano, Olaudah Equiano,and others.

ENGL 4540 The Nineteenth-Century English Novel: 3 semester hours

Novels of the Romantic and Victorian periods, from Austen to George Eliot.

ENGL 4550 Novels into Films: The Nineteenth Century: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 2320, ENGL 3090. Novels by Austen, Eliot, Wilde, Hardy, and others read in themselves and as interpreted in film. Comparisons of the representational and aesthetic techniques available to novels and film.

ENGL 4560 Prose and Poetry of the Victorian Period: 3 semester hours

Critical readings of selections from Tennyson, Browning, Arnold and others, in addition to selections from the major prose writing.

ENGL 4580 Literature of the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries: 3 semester hours

Literature of the period between 1870 and the First World War, including works by writers such as Hardy, Conrad, James, Wilde, Stevenson, Shaw, Jefferies, and Wells.

ENGL 4610 Selected Major American Writers I: 3 semester hours

American literature of the nineteenth century: Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman and others.

ENGL 4620 Selected Major American Writers II: 3 semester hours

American literature of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries: Dickinson, James, Twain, Cather, Frost, Dreiser and others.

ENGL 4640 American Fiction to World War I: 3 semester hours

Development of the novel and short story in America.

ENGL 4650 Modern American Fiction: 3 semester hours

The novel and short story in America since World War I. There may be some attention to British and continental influences.

ENGL 4740 Poetry Since World War II: 3 semester hours

Reading and analysis of contemporary poetry.

ENGL 4750 Modern British Fiction: 3 semester hours

Critical reading and analysis of British fiction of the twentieth century. There may be some attention to American and continental influences.

ENGL 4770 Modern Poetry: 3 semester hours

Critical reading and analysis of poetry of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Yeats, Eliot, Frost, Williams and others.

ENGL 4800 Linguistics: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100; majors, ENGL 3090. A survey of linguistics with emphasis on what the field reveals about the English language. Topics include the sounds of language, grammar, writing systems, language acquisition, language in society, language history, dialects, and usage.

ENGL 4810 English Grammar: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100; majors, ENGL 3090; ENGL 2810 or passing grade on English-Education Test of Basic Grammar. A study of modern English grammar from the perspectives of traditional, structural, and transformational grammar.

ENGL 4820 History of the English Language: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent. A historical survey of the English language from its IndoEuropean roots through Old and Middle English to the present. Topics include changes in sound, meaning, and grammar, as well as developments in American English, including regional and social dialects.

ENGL 4850 Topics in the Teaching of Writing: 1-3 semester hours

Same as TCH ED 5850. Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent. Special topics in the practice of and pedagody of writing designed for in-service teachers. Topics may include writing at specific grade levels, writing/reading workshops, writing in urban settings, writing across the curriculum, action research, new technology, classroom and district-level assessment. May be repeated once for credit if topics differ. Counts toward Certificate in Writing.

ENGL 4860 Editing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or its equivalent as judged by instructor; English ENGL 2810 or ENGL 4810. Introduction to the language and processes of editing. Includes copy editing, the study of style manuals, and an overview of the production process. Counts toward requirement for the Writing Certificate.

ENGL 4870 Advanced Business and Technical Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or its equivalent as judged by the instructor. An advanced, project-oriented course to produce substantial, multifaceted business and technical writing projects. These might include reports, manuals, proposals, Web projects, computer documentation, or other advanced written assignments. These projects demonstrate the ability to handle complex assignments requiring initiative, independent work, and professional-level writing skills.

ENGL 4871 Publishing: Writers, Editors, and Readers: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3120, ENGL 3130; or equivalent. Students will explore how the technological revolution has changed the way writers write, editors edit, and readers read. Topics covered will include the social and political implications of these technological advances in book, magazine, and online publishing. We will discuss how the roles of editors and writers have changed. Students will develop a semester writing or editing project that emerges out of this exploration. This course is for writers interested in having their work published and for anyone interested in working in the publishing field. This course counts toward the Professional, Creative, and Technical Writing Certificates.

ENGL 4872 Technical Presentations: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3120, ENGL 3130, or equivalent. Students learn about different kinds of presentations given in professional contexts and the technologies used to produce them. They will learn to create powerful presentations that make memorable presentations. The course is asynchronous and 100% online, and is designed for graduate students preparing papers for conferences, and for technical and business professionals presenting to their bosses, colleagues, and clients. This course counts toward the Professional and Technical Writing Certificate.

ENGL 4880 Writing for Teachers: 3 semester hours

Same as SEC ED 4880. Prerequisite: ENGL 3090 or junior level English. Writing for Teachers is an English-education course that supports writing across the curriculum for both pre-service English and content area teachers. Teacher candidates learn writing theories and literacy strategies to help their future students construct meaning from their discipline. The course works best for those who are completing level II or beginning level III education courses. The course counts toward the Certificate in Writing.

ENGL 4890 Writing Internship: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or its equivalent as judged by the instructor. Course limited to students who are completing certificates in writing. May be taken concurrently with the final course in the certificate sequence. Students work in a supervised internship to complete professional writing assignments. Special consent form required.

ENGL 4892 Independent Writing Project: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent as judged by instructor. Course limited to students who are completing their certificates in writing. May be taken concurrently with the final course in the certificate sequence. Students work individually with an instructor to complete an extensive creative writing or critical analysis writing project. This course is available on a limited basis only with the approval of the Coordinator and faculty sponsor. Special consent form is required.

ENGL 4895 Editing "Litmag: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent and at least two creative writing courses. Course is primarily for students nearing the end of their certificates in writing. Students in this course create "Litmag", the UM-St. Louis student literary magazine. Students will call for submissions; they will read and select work to be published; and they will produce the magazine, dealing with issues like format, budget, proofreading, print run, advertising, distribution, and publicity. The course is offered only in the spring and culminates with the publication of "Litmag" in late April.

ENGL 4910 Studies:African/African American Literature, Criticism & Diaspora: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Majors, ENGL 3090, Non-majors, ENGL 3100 or consent of instructor. This course focuses on the study of select topics of African and African American Literature and Criticism and Black Diaspora texts. Topics from semester to semester may vary and include such concentration areas as the Literature of Civil rights, African American Memoir, Trans-Atlantic Black Literature, Captivity and Freedom Narratives, Diaspora Studies, The African American Folk Aesthetic, Poetry of the Black Aesthetes, Theories of Race and Class, and Black Feminist Writing, among others.

ENGL 4925 The Short Story in World Literature: 3 semester hours

Students will read a wide variety of short fiction, from very brief pieces to novellas, including stories from all over the world and from several different centuries either in translation or in the original English. The course will also cover short theoretical works on narrative and critical commentaries on some of the fiction.

ENGL 4930 Studies in Gender and Literature: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 4930. The course examines the role of gender in literature, including the transformation of literary genres by women writers, writings by women during a particular historical period, and gender relations in literature. Specific topics vary from semester to semester. The course may be repeated for credit with departmental approval.

ENGL 4931 English Women Writers, 1300-1750: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 4931. Works will be read ranging in scope from closest drama and romance to lyrics to personal, political, and religious writing by women, such as Margery Kempe, Mary Sidney, and Amelia Lanyer, who wrote during a period when reading and writing were not the female norm.

ENGL 4932 Female Gothic: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 4932. The course examines the historical development of the female gothic, a genre which employs narrative strategies for expressing fears and desires associated with female experience. From the late 18th century to the present, we will trace the persistence of the Gothic vision in fiction and film.

ENGL 4934 Austen and the Brontes: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 4934. This course covers the novels of the major 19th century British writers Jane Austen and the three Bronte sisters, Anne, Emily, and Charlotte. The course will be devoted to Austen's romantic comedies and the historical/cultural contexts that inform the novels, as well as the darker romanticism of the Brontes, along with the biographical, cultural, philosophical, and religious contexts of their work.

ENGL 4939 The Bible for Students of Literature: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1110; ENGL 2310 or ENGL 2320; or equivalents. Through reading large portions of the King James Bible in conjunction with literature that alludes to Biblical stories, concepts, and imagery, students will develop a greater understanding of the way writers from medieval to modern times use Biblical references to enrich their writing.

ENGL 4950 Special Topics In Literature: 3 semester hours

Special topics in literature that are not covered in other 4000-level English courses. Since the topics of ENGL 4950 may change each semester, the course may be repeated for credit if the topics are substantially different.

ENGL 5000 Introduction to Graduate Study in English: 3 semester hours

A course designed to prepare students for the professional study of English. The course will both familiarize students with basic bibliographic tools and scholarly methods and introduce them to issues that are of current critical interest to those engaged in the advanced study of literature. These issues include gender, textuality, reader-response, multiculturalism, feminism, psychoanalysis, cultural studies, literary history and the relationship of literature to philosophy, history, and science. Must be taken within the first twelve hours of graduate study.

ENGL 5100 Graduate Workshop in Poetry: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Open to students in the creative writing program and to others with permission of instructor. Consists of a writing workshop in which the poetry written by the students enrolled in the course is discussed and analyzed by the intructor and members of the class. Students taking this course will be expected to write original poetry throughout the course. May be repeated for maximim graduate credit of fifteen (15) hours.

ENGL 5110 Graduate Workshop in Fiction: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Open to students in the creative writing program and to others with permission of instructor. Consists of a writing workshop in which the fiction (short stories or chapters of a novel) written by the students enrolled in the course is discussed and analyzed by the instructor and members of the class. Students taking this course will be expected to write original fiction thoughout the course. May be repeated for maximum graduate credit of fifteen (15) hours.

ENGL 5170 Techniques, Methods, and Effects in Fiction Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Open to students in the MFA program and to others with consent of the instructor. This course analyzes the technical choices made by important contemporary fiction writers in the areas of point of view, tone, setting, form, and plot structure, and it examines the effects of those choices. Close consideration is given to fictional techniques that contribute to a story's characterization, tension, interest, reliability, drama, irony, and humor. The course is primarily for creative writers.

ENGL 5180 Form and Theory of Poetry: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Open to students in the MFA Program and other graduate students with consent of instructor. This course explores various aspects of traditional and contemporary poetry. The student will gain an understanding of formal poetry-rhyme and meter-as well as of traditional types of poetry, for example, the lyric and the narrative. Throughout the course, an emphasis will be maintained on free verse and a greater understanding of its practice. Students will read selectvely in the poetry, theory, and critical approaches of various periods, for example, the romantic and the modern, and within various movements, such as the symbolist or confessional.

ENGL 5190 Literary Journal Editing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Open to students in the MFA program who have had at least two graduate writing workshops and to others with consent of the instructor. In this course students serve as the first readers of all submissions to the university's literary magazine, Natural Bridge. Students will read and evaluate poems, short stories, and essays and recommend a body of work to the editorial board of the magazine. The editorial board will then consider the class consensus in its final selection of material for publication. In addition to this primary task of editorial selection, students will also be involved in the productions of an issue of the magazine. May be repeated for maximum graduate credit of nine hours.

ENGL 5200 MFA Readings: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Open to students in the MFA program and to others with consent of the instructor. This is an independent reading course. In consultation with an MFA faculty member, students choose works from the MFA Reading List and read them with the goal of broadening and sharpening their technical skills as writers. Students ordinarily choose works in one genre: poetry, the short story, or the novel. Each week the student reads and reports on at least one work. The course may be taken only once.

ENGL 5250 Studies in Middle English Literature: 3 semester hours

Special topics in English literature before 1500.

ENGL 5300 Renaissance Literature: 3 semester hours

Special topics in English literature from 1500 to 1660.

ENGL 5500 Nineteenth Century Literature: 3 semester hours

Special topics in English romanticism, in Victorian life and thought, and in the development of the novel and of poetry between 1797 and 1914.

ENGL 5600 American Literature Before 1900: 3 semester hours

Selected American writers or topics from the colonial period to 1900.

ENGL 5700 Twentieth-Century American Literature: 3 semester hours

Selected American writers or topics from 1900 to the present.

ENGL 5750 Twentieth-Century British Literature: 3 semester hours

Selected British and Commonwealth writers of the twentieth century.

ENGL 5800 Modern Linguistics: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: None. A study of selected topics in the structure of the English language, combining readings in current linguistics publications with original research.

ENGL 5840 Theories of Writing: 3 semester hours

An analysis of major modern theories in composition.

ENGL 5850 Studies in Composition: 3 semester hours

The study of special topics in composition. Topics may include history of composition, psychology of writing, reader response theory, etc.

ENGL 5860 Writing/Reading Theory: 3 semester hours

This course studies the parallel evolution of reading and writing theory and pedagogy. Topics include the influence of psycholinguistics and reader-response theory and the link between reading and writing theory and instruction.

ENGL 5870 Composition Research: 3 semester hours

This course equips students both to analyze and conduct research in composition. Coursework will teach students to evaluate methodologies and implications, to analyze data, and to design their own research projects.

ENGL 5890 Teaching College Writing: 3 semester hours

This course provides the opportunity for practical application of composition theory with an emphasis on improving teaching skills. Strongly recommended for graduate teaching assistants.

ENGL 5910 Studies In Poetry: 3 semester hours

Study of a few selected British and American poets.

ENGL 5920 Studies in Fiction: 3 semester hours

Study of a few selected British and American novelists and short story writers.

ENGL 5940 Seminar in Gender and Literature: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 5940. Gender studies in literature of different periods, types, and genres; satisfies area requirement (1-6) appropriate to its period, national literature, and genre.

ENGL 5950 Seminar in Special Topics: 1-3 semester hours

Special topics which are not covered in other graduate-level English courses.

ENGL 5970 Independent Reading: 1-3 semester hours

Directed study in areas of English for which courses are not available.

ENGL 6000 Thesis: 1-6 semester hours

Prerequisite: 3.5 graduate GPA. Thesis research and writing on a selected topic in English studies. May be taken over two semesters, three (3) hours each semester.

ENGL 6880 Gateway Writing Project: 3-6 semester hours

Same as TCH ED 6880. An intensive course in the writing process and the writing curriculum, designed for experienced teachers. Readings of current theory and research will be related to participants' experience as writers and as teachers. Topics may vary. May be repeated for credit. No more than 6 hours may be applied toward the M.Ed. Counts toward the Graduate Certificate in Teaching Writing.