Chemistry and Biochemistry

Campus Address: 315 Benton Hall
Web Site: http://www.umsl.edu/chemistry
Main Number: 314-516-5311
Fax Number: 314-516-5342

General Information

Degrees and Areas of Concentration

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers courses leading to the following baccalaureate degrees:

  • B.A. in Chemistry
  • B.A. in Chemistry with a Biochemistry Certificate
  • B.S. in Chemistry (with a Chemistry or Biochemistry Option)
  • B.S. in Education with an emphasis in Chemistry (in cooperation with the College of Education)
  • B.A. in Chemistry with teacher certification.

The department is accredited by the American Chemical Society. Students completing the B.S. degree (chemistry or biochemistry option) are certified by the American Chemical Society. The B.S. degree is the professional degree in chemistry, and students who earn the B.S. degree are well prepared for a career in the chemical industry or for graduate work in chemistry. The department provides opportunities for undergraduates to become involved in ongoing research projects and to participate in departmental teaching activities.

The department also offers graduate work leading to the M.S. or Ph.D. degree in chemistry with most graduate courses being scheduled in the evening. A student may earn a M.S. degree with or without a thesis. The non-thesis option provides a convenient way for students who are employed full-time to earn an advanced degree. The department also offers a non-thesis M.S. with a professional science emphasis. This option includes 9 credit hours of business courses and an internship practicum.

Research leading to a M.S. thesis or Ph.D. dissertation may be conducted in one of four emphasis areas, namely, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chemistry, or biochemistry. The nature of the graduate program allows each student to receive individualized attention from his/her research mentor, and to develop hands-on experience with major instrumentation in the department.

Fellowships and Scholarships

The following scholarships, fellowships and awards are available to chemistry majors:

  • The John J. Taylor Scholarship is given to a full-time student with high financial need, pursuing a chemistry degree and currently enrolled either of junior or senior status. 
  • The Friends and Alumni Scholarship is given to a full-time student with high financial need and pursuing a chemistry degree. 
  • The Monsanto Scholarship in Biochemistry and Biotechnology is open to full-time Sophomore, Junior or Senior students at the University pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree in Biochemistry and Biotechnology.
  • William and Erma Cooke Chemistry Scholarships are given annually to outstanding full-time chemistry majors who are at least sophomores and have financial need.
  • The Lawrence Barton Scholarship is awarded to a junior, preferably a first generation college student.
  • The Barbara Willis Brown Scholarship for Women in Chemistry is given annually to a female chemistry major who is at least 25 years of age. The student is encouraged to enroll in undergraduate research (CHEM 3905), however research is not requirement for this award. Student financial need is a consideration.
  • The Eric G. Brunngraber Memorial Scholarship is given to a chemistry major based on GPA, statement of research interests, and performance in completed course work.
  • Aid to Education Scholarships are given to junior or senior chemistry majors annually. Faculty select awardees on the basis of merit.
  • The M. Thomas Jones Fellowship is given each semester to the graduate student who is deemed by his/her peers to have presented the best research seminar.
  • The Graduate Research Accomplishment Prize is given annually. The recipient is chosen based on his/her publications, presentations at professional meetings, and seminars given at UMSL.
  • Alumni Graduate Research Fellowships are available for summer study for selected chemistry graduate students.

Several undergraduate awards are given each year to outstanding students. The Chemical Rubber Company Introductory Chemistry Award is given to the outstanding student in introductory chemistry, the Outstanding Sophomore Chemistry Major award is made to the top sophomore chemistry student, the American Chemical Society Division of Analytical Chemistry Award is given to the outstanding student in analytical chemistry, the American Chemical Society-St. Louis Section, Outstanding Junior Chemistry Major Award is given to the outstanding junior chemistry major, and the outstanding senior receives the Alan F. Berndt Outstanding Senior Award.

Departmental Honors

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry will award departmental honors to those B.A. and B.S. degree candidates in chemistry with an overall grade point average of 3.2. They must also successfully complete CHEM 3905, Chemical Research, and must present an acceptable thesis.

Career Outlook

The St. Louis metropolitan area has long been a major center for industrial chemistry, and in the past decade it has become a focus for the establishment of life sciences research and development. A bachelor’s degree in chemistry provides a student with the professional training needed to play a part in this ever-changing industry.

A major in chemistry provides excellent preprofessional training in the health sciences, and a double major in chemistry and biology is often chosen by premedical and predental students and those interested in graduate work in biochemistry and biology. A minor in chemistry provides the minimum qualification and training for a position as a laboratory technician in industry, hospital laboratories, etc.

A Master’s degree in chemistry is often required for further advancement in the chemical industry, whereas a doctoral degree opens the door to many opportunities, including careers in the academic world, industrial research and development, and in government laboratories.

Undergraduate Studies

 

General Education Requirements

Students must satisfy the university and college general education requirements. Courses in chemistry may be used to meet the university’s science and mathematics area requirement. The college’s foreign language requirement fulfills the departmental requirements for B.A. candidates. B.S. degree candidates are not required to take a foreign language: however, the American Chemical Society (ACS) states that the study of a foreign language is recommended, especially for students planning to pursue graduate studies in chemistry.

Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Restrictions

Chemistry majors may not take required chemistry, mathematics, or physics courses on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Declaring the Chemistry Major

Students seeking to major in chemistry are first designated as ‘pre-chemistry majors’ until they have completed both CHEM 1111 and CHEM 1121 or equivalent courses. Upon successful completion of CHEM 1111 and CHEM 1121 with grades of C or better, students will be allowed to declare chemistry as their major. Each of these courses must be completed successfully within two attempts.

Degree Requirements

 

Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry

This degree is intended primarily for preprofessional students in health science and related areas, as well as prelaw students interested in patent law. Candidates must complete the following chemistry courses:

CHEM 1111Introductory Chemistry I5
CHEM 1121Introductory Chemistry II5
CHEM 2223Quantitative Analysis3
CHEM 2612Organic Chemistry I3
CHEM 2622Organic Chemistry II3
CHEM 2633Organic Chemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 3022Introduction To Chemical Literature1
CHEM 3312Physical Chemistry I3
CHEM 3322Physical Chemistry II3
CHEM 3333Physical Chemistry Laboratory I2
CHEM 3412Basic Inorganic Chemistry2
CHEM 4897Seminar1
Select one of the following:
Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Laboratory In Instrumental Analysis
Physical Chemistry Laboratory II
Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
Biochemistry Laboratory
Total Hours33

No more than 45 hours in chemistry may be applied toward the degree. Each chemistry major must present a seminar and pass a comprehensive examination during the senior year. At least 12 credits at the 3000 level or higher must be completed at UMSL. The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry may require students to pass a tracking test in order to enroll in the next level course, provided this or an equivalent test is administered to all students seeking to enroll in that course.

Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry with a Biochemistry Certificate

The university offers a certificate program for science majors who are interested in careers in biochemistry. This is an interdisciplinary program that involves additional courses in biochemistry and biology. In addition to the usual requirements for the B.A. degree in chemistry, the student must take the following courses:

Chemistry
CHEM 4712Biochemistry3
CHEM 4722Advanced Biochemistry3
CHEM 4733Biochemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 4772Physical Biochemistry3
Biology
BIOL 1831Introductory Biology: From Molecules To Organisms5
BIOL 2012Genetics3
BIOL 3622Cell Biology3
BIOL 4602Molecular Biology3
Total Hours25

At least 12 hours at the 3000 level or above must be completed at UMSL.

Students may obtain a minor in biology by adding BIOL 1821 to the curriculum described above. The Biology department also offers a certificate in biochemistry.

 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry

This is the first professional degree in chemistry. It may be taken as a terminal degree by students intending to become professional chemists or for preparation for graduate work in chemistry or biochemistry. Students may choose to specialize in chemistry or biochemistry.

Chemistry Option

Candidates must complete the requirements for the B.A. degree in chemistry. In addition, the following chemistry courses are required:

CHEM 3643Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 4212Instrumental Analysis2
CHEM 4233Laboratory In Instrumental Analysis2
CHEM 4343Physical Chemistry Laboratory II2
CHEM 4412Advanced Inorganic Chemistry3
CHEM 4433Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 4712Biochemistry3
Total Hours16

Students must also take two elective hours of advanced work in chemistry at the 3000 level or above. Students are encouraged to take CHEM 3905, Chemical Research, to fulfill the advanced elective requirement.

Biochemistry Option

Candidates must complete the requirements for the B. A. degree in chemistry. In addition, the following chemistry and biology courses are required:

Chemistry
CHEM 3643Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 4212Instrumental Analysis2
CHEM 4233Laboratory In Instrumental Analysis2
CHEM 4712Biochemistry3
CHEM 4722Advanced Biochemistry3
CHEM 4733Biochemistry Laboratory2
Select one of the following:3
Physical Biochemistry
Chemical Research (3 credits)
Research (3 credits)
Biology
BIOL 1831Introductory Biology: From Molecules To Organisms5
BIOL 2012Genetics3
BIOL 3622Cell Biology3
Total Hours28

If either research option is chosen, the project must be in biochemistry and must include a written final report submitted to the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

Fifty-one hours of chemistry courses may be applied toward the degree. At least 24 hours of chemistry at the 3xxx level or higher must be completed at UMSL. Each chemistry major candidate must present a seminar and pass a comprehensive examination during the senior year.

 

Related Area Requirements

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Chemistry

Candidates for both degrees must also complete:

MATH 1800Analytic Geometry And Calculus I5
MATH 1900Analytic Geometry And Calculus II5
MATH 2000Analytic Geometry And Calculus III5
PHYSICS 2111Physics: Mechanics And Heat5
PHYSICS 2112Physics: Electricity, Magnetism, And Optics5
Total Hours25

 

Degrees with Certification to Teach Chemistry in Secondary Schools

One can be certified to teach chemistry at the secondary level with a degree either in Education or in Chemistry. All candidates for certification must enroll in a program that includes Levels I, II, and III course work in the College of Education. The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education requires that candidates for certification to teach secondary chemistry complete certain Science Core Courses and specialized courses in chemistry

Science Core Courses
PHIL 3380Philosophy Of Science3
BIOL 1831Introductory Biology: From Molecules To Organisms5
CHEM 1111Introductory Chemistry I5
CHEM 1121Introductory Chemistry II5
BIOL 1202Environmental Biology3
PHYSICS 2111Physics: Mechanics And Heat5
Select one of the following:4
General Geology
Elementary Meteorology
Cosmic Evolution Introductory Astronomy
or equivalent
Chemistry Endorsement
CHEM 2223Quantitative Analysis3
CHEM 2612Organic Chemistry I3
CHEM 2622Organic Chemistry II3
CHEM 2633Organic Chemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 3312Physical Chemistry I3
or CHEM 3302 Physical Chemistry For The Life Sciences
CHEM 4712Biochemistry3
SEC ED 4837Chemistry/Physics Teaching Seminar2
SEC ED 4989Practicum I: Site Based Experience3
SEC ED 4990Practicum II: Site Based Experience12
Total Hours64

Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry with Teacher Certification

Students must complete the B.A. in chemistry requirements, as well as the requirements for teacher certification. (See the College of Education section of this Bulletin.) There are a few science courses beyond the minimum listed above.

PHYSICS 2112Physics: Electricity, Magnetism, And Optics5
CHEM 3322Physical Chemistry II3
CHEM 3333Physical Chemistry Laboratory I2
CHEM 3412Basic Inorganic Chemistry2
Total Hours12

Students earning BA or BS degrees in chemistry must achieve a GPA of 2.0 or higher for the combination of chemistry courses and required related area courses

.

Minor in Chemistry

 

Requirements for the Minor

Students may earn a minor in chemistry by completing the following program. The following five courses are required:

CHEM 1111Introductory Chemistry I5
CHEM 1121Introductory Chemistry II5
CHEM 2223Quantitative Analysis3
CHEM 2612Organic Chemistry I3
CHEM 2633Organic Chemistry Laboratory2
Select one of the following:2-3
Organic Chemistry II
Physical Chemistry I
Basic Inorganic Chemistry
Biochemistry
Total Hours20-21

Courses, which are prerequisites to subsequent courses in the minor, may not be taken on a satisfactory/ unsatisfactory basis. A GPA of at least 2.0 is required for the courses presented for the minor. At least three courses toward the minor must be completed at UMSL.

Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry and Biotechnology

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, in cooperation with the Department of Biology, offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Biochemistry and Biotechnology. Information about this degree program may be found at the Biochemistry & Biotechnology Programs Home Page.

 

3+4 Chemistry – Optometry Program

This is a new program option for a Chemistry degree that would enable students to earn a BA in Chemistry in 3 years (likely requiring that some courses be taken over the summer semesters) and an Optometry degree in 4 years.

1st Semester (15)

CHEM 1111Introductory Chemistry I5
BIOL 1821Introductory Biology: Organisms And The Environment5
MATH 1800Analytic Geometry And Calculus I5
Total Hours15

2nd Semester (18)

CHEM 1121Introductory Chemistry II5
BIOL 1831Introductory Biology: From Molecules To Organisms5
MATH 1900Analytic Geometry And Calculus II5
PSYCH 1003General Psychology 13
Total Hours18

Summer Option

Summer Semester (3-8)

CHEM 2612Organic Chemistry I3
CHEM 2622Organic Chemistry II3
CHEM 2633Organic Chemistry Laboratory2
Or General Education Courses 2
Total Hours8

3rd Semester (13+)

MATH 2000Analytic Geometry And Calculus III5
PHYSICS 2111Physics: Mechanics And Heat5
CHEM 2612Organic Chemistry I 33
General Education Courses 2
Total Hours13

4th Semester (15)

PHYSICS 2112Physics: Electricity, Magnetism, And Optics5
CHEM 2223Quantitative Analysis3
CHEM 3412Basic Inorganic Chemistry2
CHEM 2622Organic Chemistry II 33
CHEM 2633Organic Chemistry Laboratory 32
Total Hours15

Summer Option

Summer Semester (3-8)

CHEM 2612Organic Chemistry I3
CHEM 2622Organic Chemistry II3
CHEM 2633Organic Chemistry Laboratory2
Or General Education Courses 2
Total Hours8

5th Semester (13+)

CHEM 3022Introduction To Chemical Literature1
CHEM 3312Physical Chemistry I3
CHEM 4712Biochemistry 43
CHEM 4733Biochemistry Laboratory 42
PSYCH 2201Psychological Statistics 14
General Education Course 2
Total Hours13

6th Semester (11+1)

CHEM 3333Physical Chemistry Laboratory I2
CHEM 3322Physical Chemistry II3
CHEM 4897Seminar1
BIOL 2482Microbiology 13
BIOL 2483Microbiology Laboratory 12
General Education Courses 2
Total Hours11

Summer Option

Summer Semester

General Education Courses 1
Total Hours0

The basis for this 3+4 program is that students are required to do the courses (and the prerequisites) for the Chemistry Bachelor of Arts degree with the exception that students can substitute Optometry’s Physical Optics and Photometry course (OPTOM 8140) for the advanced laboratory which is required for the B.A. in chemistry degree; additionally CHEM 3322 (Physical Chemistry II and CHEM 4897 (Seminar) can be completed in the first year of enrollment in the Optometry program though this is NOT recommended because students in the Optometry program take more than 20 credit hours each semester. In order to complete the chemistry program in 3 years, it is likely that some courses would need to be taken over the summer sessions (between semester 2 and 3 and between semester 4 and 5). Three chemistry classes that also are offered over the summer are suggested as options in the above schedule. These are quite compacted classes so it is not generally advised as the best option. If that summer option is chosen for those chemistry classes, however, some of the required General Education courses can be taken during the regular (3rd and 4th) semesters in place of the chemistry classes (CHEM 2612, CHEM 2622, CHEM 2633) that also are scheduled for the 3rd and 4th semester. Alternatively, General Education courses can be taken in the summer.

1

The College of Optometry requires two courses in English [e.g., Freshman Composition (ENGL 1100), junior English courses (e.g., ENGL 3160, ENGL 3100)] which is also a General Education requirement, two courses in Psychology, two Liberal Arts courses, a Statistics course, and a course in Microbiology with Lab. If Psychological Statistics (PSYCH 2201, 4 credits) is taken as the second Psychology course, that also satisfies the Statistics course requirement. One of the courses suggested in psychology (General Psychology, PSYCH 1003) also satisfies one of the three-course requirement in Social and Behavioral Sciences Knowledge (see not below on General Education courses).

2

General Education courses [(1) Communicating Skills (two 3 credit courses), (2) Managing Information Skills (one 3-credit course), (3) Valuing Skill (one 3-credit course, (4) Social and Behavioral Science Knowledge (three 3-credit courses) (5) Humanities and Fine Arts Knowledge (three 3-credit courses), and (6) Mathematics and Life/Natural Sciences Knowledge (four 3-credit courses)] and Foreign Language courses (required for the Chemistry B.A. degree) are not listed specifically here. The requirements for Skill Goal 2 and Knowledge Goal 6 would be fulfilled by completing courses in the program listed above.

3

CHEM 2612, CHEM 2622, and CHEM 2633 are courses offered during the summer; currently, CHEM 2223 is not.

4

The College of Optometry strongly recommends a course in Anatomy or Physiology and a course in Biochemistry. BIOL 1102 satisfies the Anatomy or Physiology requirement but this course is not included in the schedule listed above. Another course recommended by the College of Optometry is Cell Biology (BIOL 3622, Cell Biology, 3 credits)- this is not listed above either.

Gaining admission to Missouri’s College of Optometry is a competitive process. Students selecting this 3+4 option should seek an initial interview with the Manager, Student and Special Services (and the Pre-Optometry Advisor) in the UMSL College of Optometry to insure that all prerequisites for the College of Optometry will be completed. In August following the completion of their second year of this 3+4 program, students may apply formally to the UMSL College of Optometry and arrange to take the Optometry Admissions Test (OAT) early in the fall of their third year. The OAT is offered through computer sites and may be scheduled almost at any time. After receipt of a completed application in the Fall Semester of the candidate’s third year and depending on the OAT outcome, the applicant may be invited for a formal interview in the College of Optometry. Following the formal interview, candidates with a 3.0 or better grade point average in the science prerequisites for optometry and a score of 310 or better in the OAT exam may be accepted into the UMSL College of Optometry.

Competencies/Expectations/Outcomes that all students must demonstrate to complete the program successfully:

  1. Knowledge and comprehension in areas of chemistry - Graduates should have a foundation of knowledge in chemistry as outlined by the American Chemical Society Committee on Professional Training in their guide to Undergraduate Professional Education in Chemistry. In order to achieve the goals of any one of our chemistry degrees, knowledge is required from the related areas of introductory physics and calculus.
  2. Scientific problem-solving skills - Graduates should understand valid scientific approaches to problem-solving and be able to design experiments to test a hypothesis.
  3. Data analysis/quantitative skills - Graduates should be able to draw valid conclusions from experimental data and observations. Graduates should be able to carry out statistical and linear regression analysis of data. Graduates should be able to evaluate the main possible sources of error in laboratory measurements.
  4. Laboratory skills - Graduates should be able to carry out the basic techniques of preparative and analytical chemistry. An appreciation of the basic aspects of chemical spectroscopy should be achieved. B.S. degree graduates should have developed an appreciation of the application of advanced/specialized instrumentation to solving chemical problems. Graduates should be able to keep accurate records of experiments. Graduates should be able to work effectively in the laboratory individually or as a part of a small team. Graduates should have an awareness of the basic aspects of safe laboratory practices.
  5. Communication skills - Graduates should be able to communicate scientific ideas clearly both orally and in written form. This includes the effective presentation of quantitative data and of scientific concepts or procedures using diagrams and/or figures.
  6. Library/Information skills - Graduates should be able to search for and retrieve information from scientific journals, databases, and handbooks, especially those widely used by professional chemists.
  7. Computer/software skills - Graduates should be proficient in the use of software widely used by practicing scientists, including word processors, scientific plotting and analysis software, spreadsheets, data acquisition software interfaced to commercial instruments, and simulation software.

Graduate Studies

Admission Requirements

Individuals with at least the equivalent of the B.A. degree in the natural sciences may be admitted to the Graduate School as candidates for the M.S. degree or as precandidates for the Ph.D. degree in chemistry. A student in the M.S. program may request to transfer to the Ph.D. program by petition to the department.

The department admissions committee considers applicants' grade point averages and normally requires above-average performance in all areas of chemistry as well as physics and mathematics, or other evidence of high aptitude for graduate work in chemistry. Applicants' GRE scores, letters of recommendation, and academic programs are also considered. In some cases the committee may require successful completion of undergraduate course work as a condition of enrollment as a regular student.

Students with bachelor's degrees in fields other than chemistry may be admitted to pursue graduate studies in chemistry, but they must make up background deficiencies, usually by taking undergraduate course work.

Financial Support

Teaching assistantships are available to qualified applicants. Research assistantships and fellowships are available for advanced students. Departmental support is not normally available beyond the fifth year in the program. For further information,
contact the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Graduate Admissions.

Preliminary Advisement

Students who have been admitted for graduate work in chemistry will be contacted by the Director of Graduate Studies in order to develop a tentative plan of study which takes into consideration the student's background and interests. Entering students are required to demonstrate proficiency at the undergraduate level in four areas of chemistry (biochemistry, organic, inorganic, physical, and analytical).

Proficiency may be demonstrated in one of the following ways:

  • Outstanding performance in recent undergraduate course work.
  • Satisfactory performance in standardized placement examinations. These examinations are given twice a year, approximately one week before the beginning of the fall and winter semesters.
  • Successful completion of assigned course work.

The ultimate choice of whether students may enroll in the M.S. or Ph.D. degree programs resides with the chemistry faculty.

Master's Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Chemistry

Within two years of initial enrollment, candidates for the M.S. degree in chemistry must demonstrate proficiency at the undergraduate level in four of the following five areas: biochemistry, organic, inorganic, physical, and analytical chemistry.

A minimum of 30 hours is required, normally including 3 hours in CHEM 6897 Chemistry Colloquium. No more than 3 hours in CHEM 6897 may be applied toward the 30 credit hours.


Distribution Requirement

Students may choose to focus their coursework efforts in one of four broadly defined subdiscipline areas (biochemistry, inorganic, organic, or physical chemistry). At least 6 hours of chemistry coursework in one (or more) sub-disciplines(s) outside of their major emphasis area must be completed. The following courses do not fulfill the distribution requirement:

CHEM 4212Instrumental Analysis2
CHEM 4233Laboratory In Instrumental Analysis2
CHEM 4302Survey Of Physical Chemistry With Applications To The Life Scienc3
CHEM 4343Physical Chemistry Laboratory II2
CHEM 4412Advanced Inorganic Chemistry3
CHEM 4433Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 4712Biochemistry3
CHEM 4733Biochemistry Laboratory2


 

Master of Science in Chemistry with Thesis

Students selecting this option must be enrolled full-time for at least two consecutive semesters. During this time, students are expected to enroll in CHEM 6905, Graduate Research in Chemistry, and conduct their thesis research. A maximum of 12 hours of may be applied toward the required 30 hours. At least 9 hours must be at the 5000 level, excluding CHEM 6905. A maximum of 9 hours in 3000 level or above courses outside the department may be accepted if students receive prior approval of their advisers and the Director of Graduate Studies. Students are expected to follow all other general requirements of the Graduate School regarding master’s degree and thesis requirements.

Master of Science without Thesis

Unlike the thesis option, students need not be enrolled full-time. Of the required 30 hours, 15 credits must be at the 5000 level. A maximum of 6 credits of CHEM 6905, Graduate Research in Chemistry, may be included in place of 4000 level courses; a maximum of 12 hours taken in 3000 level or above courses outside the department may be accepted with prior approval of the Director of Graduate Studies.


 

Master of Science Degrees for Doctoral Students


Doctoral students may receive a Master’s degree in their program for work completed towards the doctoral degree. To receive a Master’s degree, doctoral students must complete 30 credit hours of courses, with at least 15 of these credit hours in courses numbered at or above the 5000 level. No more than 3 hours in CHEM 6897, 3 hours from a combination of CHEM 6487, CHEM 6687, CHEM 6787, CHEM 6812, CHEM 6822 and CHEM 6832, and 6 hours of CHEM 6905 may be applied.

There are no distribution requirements for the Master's degree for Doctoral students.

The non-dissertation courses presented for the M.S. degree may not include any of the following courses:

CHEM 4212Instrumental Analysis2
CHEM 4233Laboratory In Instrumental Analysis2
CHEM 4302Survey Of Physical Chemistry With Applications To The Life Scienc3
CHEM 4343Physical Chemistry Laboratory II2
CHEM 4412Advanced Inorganic Chemistry3
CHEM 4433Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 4712Biochemistry3
CHEM 4733Biochemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 6196Advanced Reading In Chemistry1


 

Master of Science in Chemistry (Professional Science Emphasis)

(pending CBHE approval)

This option requires a minimum of 32 hours, of which 16 credit hours must be at or above the 5000 level. Students must take 21 credit hours of chemistry, 9 hours in business, and 2 credits hours of internship or practicum. A maximum of 3 credits of CHEM 6897 may be applied toward the required minimum of number of chemistry credits (21 hours).

The courses presented for the Master’s degree (professional science emphasis) may not include any of the following:

CHEM 4212Instrumental Analysis2
CHEM 4233Laboratory In Instrumental Analysis2
CHEM 4302Survey Of Physical Chemistry With Applications To The Life Scienc3
CHEM 4343Physical Chemistry Laboratory II2
CHEM 4412Advanced Inorganic Chemistry3
CHEM 4433Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 4712Biochemistry3
CHEM 4733Biochemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 6196Advanced Reading In Chemistry1
CHEM 6487Problem Seminar In Inorganic Chemistry1
CHEM 6687Problem Seminar In Organic Chemistry1-3
CHEM 6787Problem Seminar In Biochemistry1
CHEM 6812Introduction To Graduate Study In Chemistry1
CHEM 6822Introduction To Graduate Research In Chemistry1
CHEM 6905Graduate Research In Chemistry1-10

 Emphasis Area Requirements

Elective Courses in Business (9 credit hours required)
MGMT 3623Industrial And Organizational Psychology3
BUS AD 5000Economics For Managers3
BUS AD 5100Managerial Communication3
MGMT 5600Managing People in Organizations 3
MKTG 5700Contemporary Marketing Concepts3
BUS AD 5900Law, Ethics And Business3
Required Internship or Practicum (2 credit hours required)
CHEM 5798Practicum in Science in Business2
or CHEM 5799 Internship in Science in Business

Doctoral Degree Requirements

Within one year of initial enrollment, incoming doctoral students must demonstrate proficiency in four of the following five areas:  biochemistry, organic, inorganic, physical, and analytical chemistry. A minimum of 60 credit hours is required, including research hours.

Comprehensive Exam Committee

Before the end of the second regular semester of study, the doctoral student and his/her research advisor will select a comprehensive exam committee. The student should prepare Graduate School form D-1, which should be signed by the research advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies, and filed with the graduate school.

In the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, the comprehensive exam committee also serves as a mentoring committee for the student. The committee will meet with the student at the end of each spring semester to review progress in coursework and research. A written report summarizing their assessment and recommendations will be provided to the student and the Director of Graduate Studies. 

Comprehensive Examinations

Each student seeking the Ph.D. degree must successfully complete a comprehensive  examination prior to advancement to candidacy.
The comprehensive exam is typically taken when formal coursework has been completed, but it must be completed before the start of the fifth regular semester.

The comprehensive exam consists of writing an original research proposal and an oral defense that will be evaluated by the student’s committee. The student will select a topic that is not directly related to the expected research area. The research advisor must approve the topic. The specific format for the proposal is described in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Handbook of Graduate Studies.

Dissertation Proposal

Doctoral students must prepare and defend a Dissertation Proposal before the student has completed the equivalent of 6 regular semesters of full-time study. The proposal should be defended within six months following successful completion of the Comprehensive Examination.

The Dissertation Proposal includes both a written and oral component. Both components will be evaluated by the student’s Comprehensive Examination committee. The written proposal will be submitted to the Comprehensive Examination committee and will be presented as a seminar to the Department. After the seminar, the student will defend the proposal before the Comprehensive Examination committee.

Advancement to Candidacy

In addition to general Graduate School requirements for advancement to candidacy, students must complete the following:

1. 18 hours of non-dissertation work.
 This may not include:

CHEM 4212Instrumental Analysis2
CHEM 4233Laboratory In Instrumental Analysis2
CHEM 4302Survey Of Physical Chemistry With Applications To The Life Scienc3
CHEM 4343Physical Chemistry Laboratory II2
CHEM 4412Advanced Inorganic Chemistry3
CHEM 4433Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 4712Biochemistry3
CHEM 4733Biochemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 6196Advanced Reading In Chemistry1
CHEM 6487Problem Seminar In Inorganic Chemistry1
CHEM 6687Problem Seminar In Organic Chemistry1-3
CHEM 6787Problem Seminar In Biochemistry1
CHEM 6812Introduction To Graduate Study In Chemistry1
CHEM 6822Introduction To Graduate Research In Chemistry1
CHEM 6897Chemistry Colloquium1

At least 9 of the 18 credits of non-dissertation coursework must be at the 5000 level. Courses in areas other than chemistry may be included with prior departmental approval.

2. Successfully pass a Comprehensive Examination.

3. Successfully present and defend a dissertation proposal.

4. Submit the proposal for approval to the Graduate School.

5. Be in good standing.

Seminar Requirement

Students must enroll in CHEM 6897, Chemistry Colloquium, each semester they are in residence. In their final semester in the program, each student will present an “exit seminar” to the
Department describing the results of their dissertation research.

Dissertation

One copy of the dissertation must be submitted upon completion of the graduate research problem.

Probation and Dismissal

Students are dismissed from the Ph.D. program if they fail to pass their Comprehensive Examination or otherwise fail to meet the academic and professional standards set forth by the Graduate School and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

Master of Science in Biochemistry and Biotechnology

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, in cooperation with the Department of Biology, offers a Master of Science degree in Biochemistry and Biotechnology. Information about this degree program may be found at the Biochemistry & Biotechnology Programs Home Page.

Sample Four Year Plans

Chemistry BA         Chemistry BS, Biochemistry Option      Chemistry BS, Chemistry Option

Chemistry BA

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
INTDSC 100311CHEM 11215
CHEM 11115MATH 18005
MATH 10352General Education6
ENGL 11003 
General Education3 
 14 16
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CHEM 22233CHEM 26223
CHEM 26123CHEM 26332
MATH 19005MATH 20005
General Education3PHYSICS 21115
 14 15
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CHEM 33123CHEM 33223
PHYSICS 21125CHEM 33332
CHEM 30221Foreign Language 10015
CHEM 34122General Education3
ENGL 31003Elective or minor3
 14 16
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
Foreign Language 10025Foreign Language 21013
CHEM 3643 or 43432CHEM 48971
General Education3General Education6
Elective or minor6Elective or minor6
 16 16
Total Hours: 121
1

INTDSC 1003 is required only for first-time freshmen and transfer students with less than 24 college credits.

PLEASE NOTE: This plan is an example of what a four year plan could look like for a typical student. Placement exam scores in math as well as the completion of coursework may change the plan. It should not be used in the place of regular academic advising appointments. All students are encouraged to meet with their advisor each semester. All requirements are subject to change.

Chemistry BS, Biochemistry Option

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
INTDSC 100311CHEM 11215
CHEM 11115MATH 18005
MATH 10352General Education 6
ENGL 11003 
General Education 6 
 17 16
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CHEM 22233CHEM 26223
CHEM 34122CHEM 26332
CHEM 26123MATH 20005
MATH 19005PHYSICS 21115
General Education3 
 16 15
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CHEM 33123PHYSICS 21125
CHEM 47123CHEM 33223
CHEM 30221CHEM 33332
BIOL 18315ENGL 31003
CHEM 47332General Education3
 14 16
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CHEM 42122CHEM 42332
CHEM 44123CHEM 47723
CHEM 4722 or 390523CHEM 39051
BIOL 3622 or 20123CHEM 48971
General Education3General Education 6
Elective or minor3 
 17 13
Total Hours: 124
1

INTDSC 1003 is required only for first-time freshmen and transfer students with less than 24 college credits. 

2

 CHEM 3905 may be taken for one credit hour with this plan.

 PLEASE NOTE: This plan is an example of what a four year plan could look like for a typical student. Placement exam scores in math as well as the completion of coursework may change the plan. It should not be used in the place of regular academic advising appointments. All students are encouraged to meet with their advisor each semester. All requirements are subject to change.

Chemistry BS, Chemistry Option

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
INTDSC 10031CHEM 11215
CHEM 11115MATH 18005
MATH 10352General Education6
ENGL 11003 
General Education 6 
 17 16
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CHEM 22233CHEM 26223
CHEM 34122CHEM 26332
CHEM 26123MATH 20005
MATH 19005PHYSICS 21115
General Education3 
 16 15
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CHEM 33123PHYSICS 21125
CHEM 47123CHEM 33223
CHEM 30221CHEM 33332
ENGL 31003General Education6
General Education3 
Elective or minor3 
 16 16
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CHEM 36432CHEM 39051
CHEM 42122CHEM 42332
CHEM 43432CHEM 44332
CHEM 44123CHEM 48971
CHEM 39051Elective or minor6
Elective or minor3 
 13 12
Total Hours: 121
1

INTDSC 1003 is required only for first-time freshmen and transfer students with less than 24 college credits.

 PLEASE NOTE: This plan is an example of what a four year plan could look like for a typical student. Placement exam scores in math as well as the completion of coursework may change the plan. It should not be used in the place of regular academic advising appointments. All students are encouraged to meet with their advisor each semester. All requirements are subject to change.

Courses

CHEM 1011 Chemistry In The Environment And Every Day Living: 3 semester hours

This course examines the role of chemistry in everyday life and in the environment, and is intended for students not pursuing scientific or engineering majors. Chemical principles are introduced to the extent necessary for understanding of issues, but this course does not provide the basis for further technical courses. Two hours of lecture per week; on alternate weeks, one hour of discussion or two hours of laboratory.

CHEM 1052 Chemistry For The Health Professions: 4 semester hours

An introduction to general, nuclear, structural organic, organic reactions and biochemistry. This course is designed primarily for students in nursing and related health professions, and should not be taken by students majoring in the physical or biological sciences. Chemistry majors may include neither CHEM 1052 or CHEM 1062 in the 120 hours required for graduation. Four hours of lecture per week.

CHEM 1062 Organic & Biochem For The Health Professions: 2 semester hours

Prerequisites: Any college Chemistry course An introduction to organic reactions and biochemistry. CHEM 1062 is offered during the second half of the semester. Four hours of lecture per week.

CHEM 1081 Introductory Chemistry I-A: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: MATH 1030 (or a score of 26 or higher on either the Math ACT or the Math Placement Test). This course is designed for students who want to have an in depth understanding of introductory concepts in Chemistry. CHEM 1081 covers the topics taught in the first half of CHEM 1111 but at a slower pace, thus allowing students time to fully integrate the concepts and thereby build a stronger foundation for their subsequent Chemistry courses. CHEM 1081 consists of the first half of CHEM 1111 (excluding laboratory experiments), whereas CHEM 1091 covers all the laboratory experiments and second half of lecture part of CHEM 1111. Three hours of lecture or workshop per week.

CHEM 1091 Introductory Chemistry IB: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 1081 and MATH 1035 (MATH 1035 may be taken concurrently). CHEM 1091 is the completion of CHEM 1111 for students who have completed CHEM 1081. The laboratory portion of this course will start at the beginning of the semester. The lecture part of the course starts in mid-semester and students join an ongoing CHEM 1111 class. Students who completed CHEM 1081 must complete CHEM 1091 to be considered as having completed the equivalent of CHEM 1111. Three hours of lecture and one and one half hours of workshop during the second half of the semester, and three hours of laboratory per week during the entire semester.

CHEM 1111 Introductory Chemistry I: 5 semester hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1030 (or a score of 26 or higher on either the Math ACT or the Missouri Math Placement Test) and MATH 1035 (MATH 1035 may be taken concurrently). Presents an introduction to the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry. Laboratory experiments are designed to demonstrate some aspects of qualitative and quantitative analysis and to develop skills in laboratory procedures. Chemistry majors may not include both CHEM 1011 and CHEM 1111 in the 120 hours required for graduation. Three hours of lecture, one and one-half hours of workshop, and three hours of laboratory per week.

CHEM 1121 Introductory Chemistry II: 5 semester hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 1111 or advanced placement. Lecture and laboratory are a continuation of CHEM 1111. Three hours of lecture, one and one-half hours of workshop and three hours laboratory per week.

CHEM 1134 Special Topics In Introductory Chemistry: 1-5 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. A lecture and/or laboratory course to assist transfer students to complete the equivalent of CHEM 1111 and CHEM 1121. Students enrolling in this course should contact the instructor prior to the first day of class for guidelines on course requirements, to choose a lab or workshop section, and to request enrollment in the course website.

CHEM 2223 Quantitative Analysis: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 1121 Principles and practice of elementary quantitative chemistry. The lecture treats descriptive statistics with emphasis on small samples; various types of competing equilibria pertaining to acid-base, complexometric, and potentiometric titrations; and an introduction to spectrophotometric processes. The laboratory provides exercises in titrimetric gravimetric, and spectrophotometric techniques. Both portions of the course deal with the analytical chemistry of environmentally-significant problems. Two hours of lecture and four and one-half hours of laboratory weekly.

CHEM 2612 Organic Chemistry I: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 1121 (may be taken concurrently). An introduction to the structure, properties, synthesis, and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic carbon compounds. Three hours of lecture per week.

CHEM 2622 Organic Chemistry II: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 2612. A systematic study of organic reactions and their mechanisms; organic synthetic methods. Three hours of lecture per week.

CHEM 2633 Organic Chemistry Laboratory: 2 semester hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 2612 An introduction to laboratory techniques and procedures of synthetic organic chemistry including analysis of organic compounds. One hour of lecture and four and one-half hours of laboratory per week.

CHEM 3022 Introduction To Chemical Literature: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: CHEM 2622 (2622 may be taken concurrently) and CHEM 3412. This course will familiarize the student with the literature of chemistry and its use. One hour of lecture per week.

CHEM 3302 Physical Chemistry For The Life Sciences: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 2612 and MATH 1800 or MATH 1100, and PHYSICS 1012 Principles and applications of physical chemistry appropriate to students pursuing degree programs in the life sciences. Topics will include thermodynamics, equilibria, kinetics, and spectroscopy. This course is intended for undergraduates seeking the B.S. degree in Biochemistry and Biotechnology and does not fulfill the physical chemistry required for other Chemistry B.A. and B.S. degree programs.

CHEM 3312 Physical Chemistry I: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 1121 and MATH 2000 ( MATH 2000 may be taken concurrently), and PHYSICS 2111. Principles of physical chemistry, including thermodynamics, theory of gases, phase equilibria, kinetics, crystal structure, spectroscopy, and quantum mechanics. Three hours per week.

CHEM 3322 Physical Chemistry II: 3 semester hours

Prerquisite: CHEM 3312 and MATH 2000.Continuation of CHEM 3312. Three hours lecture per week.

CHEM 3333 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I: 2 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 2223 and CHEM 3312 Experiments designed to illustrate principles introduced in CHEM 3312. One hour of lecture and four and one-half hours of laboratory per week.

CHEM 3412 Basic Inorganic Chemistry: 2 semester hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 1121. This course reviews the principles of atomic structure and studies covalent and ionic bonding. Topics include properties of the elements and synthesis, reactions and bonding aspects of important main group and transition metal compounds. Two hours lecture per week.

CHEM 3643 Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory: 2 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 3022 Identification of organic compounds by classical and spectroscopic methods; advanced techniques in synthesis and seperation of organic compounds. One hour of lecture and four and one-half hours of laboratory per week. Not for graduate credit.

CHEM 3905 Chemical Research: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Independent laboratory and library study, in conjunction with faculty member, of fundamental problems in chemistry. A written report describing the research is required.

CHEM 4212 Instrumental Analysis: 2 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 3322 Principles and applications of modern methods of instrumental analysis for analytical chemistry measurements. Topics will be selected from the areas of electrochemistry, absorption and emission spectroscopy, chromatography, mass spectometry, surface analysis, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Two hours of lecture per week.

CHEM 4233 Laboratory In Instrumental Analysis: 2 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 4212, CHEM 3333 Experiments designed to illustrate the principles and practices of instrumental analysis, involving the use of modern instrumentation in analytical chemistry applications. One hour of discussion and four and one-half hours of laboratory per week.

CHEM 4302 Survey Of Physical Chemistry With Applications To The Life Scienc: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 2612 and MATH 1800 or MATH 1100, and PHYSICS 1012. Principles of physical chemistry with applications to the life sciences. Topics will include thermodynamics, equilibria, kinetics, and spectroscopy. This course will be taught simultaneously with CHEM 3302, but students in CHEM 4302 will have additional assignments or projects. No student may receive credit for both CHEM 3302 and CHEM 4302.

CHEM 4343 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II: 2 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 3322 (may be taken concurrently) and CHEM 3333. Experiments designed to illustrate principles introduced in CHEM 2322. One hour of lecture and four and one-half hours of laboratory per week. Not for graduate credit.

CHEM 4412 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 3322 (may be taken concurrently), CHEM 3412, and CHEM 2622 An introduction to the chemistry of the elements, including atomic and molecular structure, acids and bases, the chemistry of the solid state, and main group and transition metal chemistry. Three hours of lecture per week.

CHEM 4433 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory: 2 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 3333, CHEM 3643, and CHEM 4412 (CHEM 3643 may be taken concurrently) The more sophisticated techniques of physical and analytical chemistry will be used to study inorganic compounds and their reactions. One hours of lecture and four and one half hours of laboratory per week. Not for graduate credit.

CHEM 4652 Spectroscopic Identification Of Organic Compounds: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 3643 An applied approach to the use of spectroscopic techniques in organic chemistry. Topics to include integrated applications of infrared and Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (13C and 1H, cw and pulsed) and mass spectroscopy for the purpose of elucidating the structure of organic compounds. Three hours of lecture per week.

CHEM 4712 Biochemistry: 3 semester hours

Same as BIOL 4712. Prerequisites: CHEM 2612 and either BIOL 1831 or CHEM 2622. Examines the chemistry and function of cell constituents, and the interaction and conversions of intracellular substances. Students may not receive credit for both BIOL 4712 and CHEM 4712.

CHEM 4722 Advanced Biochemistry: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 4712. Selected advanced topics in the chemistry of life processes. Three hours lecture per week.

CHEM 4733 Biochemistry Laboratory: 2 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 4712 (may be taken concurrently), and CHEM 2223.Laboratory study of biochemical processes in cellular and subcellular systems with emphasis on the isolation and purification of proteins (enzymes) and the characterization of catalytic properties. One hour of lecture and four and one-half hours of laboratory per week.

CHEM 4772 Physical Biochemistry: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 3312 or CHEM 4712/ BIOL 4712 Designed to acquaint students with concepts and methods in biophysical chemistry. Topics that will be discussed include protein and DNA structures, forces involved in protein folding and conformational stability, protein-DNA interactions, methods for characterization and separation of macromolecules, electron transfer, and biological spectroscopy. Three hours of lecture per week.

CHEM 4797 Biochemistry and Biotechnology Seminar: 1 semester hour

Same as BIOL 4797. Prerequisites: Senior standing in the Biochemistry and Biotechnology program. This course will focus on selected publications related to biochemistry and biotechnology from both refereed journals and news sources. Students are expected to participate in discussions and to prepare oral and written presentations. Completion of the Major Field Achievement Test in Biochemistry & Biotechnology is a course requirement. May not be taken for graduate credit.

CHEM 4814 Special Topics In Chemistry: 1-10 semester hours

A reading and seminar course in selected advanced topics.

CHEM 4897 Seminar: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: CHEM 3022 and senior standing Presentation of papers by students, faculty, and invited speakers. Chemistry majors must enroll during the semester in which they intend to graduate. Completion of a comprehensive examination during one of the semesters is a course requirement One hour of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

CHEM 5394 Special Topics In Physical Chemistry: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Selected topics in physical chemistry; may be taken more than once for credit.

CHEM 5396 Directed Readings in Physical Chemistry: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of Physical Chemistry Faculty. A series of readings of monographs, review papers, and/or research publications for a particular student directed at providing that student with appropriate background preparation for experimental or theoretical Ph.D.-level research in an area of physical chemistry. The particular readings will be selected by the physical chemistry staff. Potential topics include but are not limited to advances in Electrochemistry, Surface Chemistry, Thermodynamics, Molecular Spectroscopy, Quantitative Absorption Spectroscopy using new Methodologies, Applications of Group Theory in Spectroscopy, and Computational Chemistry. Assessment may be in various forms including by assignments and seminars. Students may take this course more than once for credit through the particular topic must be different in each case.

CHEM 5422 Coordination Chemistry: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 4412 or an equivalent course. Chemistry of the coordination compounds of the transition metals including such topics as kinetics and mechanisms of reaction, stereochemistry, ligand field theory, stability and electronic spectra. Three hours of lecture per week.

CHEM 5462 Organometallic Chemistry Of The Transition Elements: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 4412 or an equivalent course. A study of transition metal compounds containing metal-carbon bonds and related metal-element bonds, including their synthesis, structure and bonding, and reactions. Applications in organic synthesis and catalysis will also be presented. Three hours of lecture per week.

CHEM 5494 Special Topics In Inorganic Chemistry: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Selected topics in organic chemistry; may be taken more than once for credit.

CHEM 5602 Advanced Organic Chemistry I - Physical Organic: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 2622 and CHEM 3322 Mechanism and theory of organic chemistry. Topics to include kinetics, transition state theory, reaction intermediates, and stereochemical analysis. Three hours of lecture per week.

CHEM 5612 Advanced Organic Chemistry II - Reactions And Synthesis: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 2622 This course will examine a variety of organic transformations typically utilized in organic synthesis. Topics will include carbon-carbon bond formation, pericyclic reactions, oxidation, reduction, and functional group interconversions. Mechanism and stereochemistry will be emphasized. Three hours of lecture per week.

CHEM 5694 Special Topics In Organic Chemistry: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor Advanced topics of special current interest. May be taken more than once for credit. Topics that may be offered include: Methods in Organic Synthesis, Organometallics in Organic Synthesis, Topics in Bioorganic Chemistry, Organic thermochemistry, Natural Products Chemistry, Stereochemistry, Photochemistry, Heterocyclic Chemistry, Medicinal Chemistry.

CHEM 5774 Bioinformatics: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 4712 or equivalent. This course introduces modern approaches in bioinformatics and computational biochemistry. Topics to be covered include a survey of biological databases, predictions from protein and DNA sequences, sequence alignment and sequence database searches, building phylogenetic trees, three-dimensional protein structure prediction, and molecular modeling and simulation.

CHEM 5794 Special Topics In Biochemistry: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor Selected topics in biochemistry. May be taken more than once for credit.

CHEM 5798 Practicum in Science in Business: 1-2 semester hours

Same As BIOL 5798. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and enrollment in a Professional Science emphasis in Chemistry, Biochemistry & Biotechnology, or Biology. Students will integrate and apply their scientific expertise to a practical, business-related problem. The course will emphasize interdisciplinary team-work as well as both written and oral communication skills.

CHEM 5799 Internship in Science in Business: 1-2 semester hours

Same As BIOL 5799. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and enrollment in a Professional Science emphasis area in Chemistry, Biochemistry & Biotechnology, or Biology. The internship will consist of period of on-the-job training at a local company. Credit hours will be determined by the number of hours the student works each week and in consultation between the intern's supervisor and the course instructor. Internship assignments will be commensurate with the education and experience of the student, with an emphasis on work at the interface between the scientific and business components of the company. A written report describing the internship project is required.

CHEM 6196 Advanced Reading In Chemistry: 1 semester hour

Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph.D. program. Reading and examinations in the sub-disciplines of chemistry. Enrollment must begin after completion of any course deficiencies.

CHEM 6487 Problem Seminar In Inorganic Chemistry: 1 semester hour

Prerequisite: Consent of the inorganic chemistry staff. Problems from the current literature, presentations and discussions by faculty, students and visiting scientists. Ph.D. students may take more than once for credit. Up to three credits may be applied to the M.S. degree program.

CHEM 6687 Problem Seminar In Organic Chemistry: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of the organic chemistry staff. Problems from the current literature, presentations and discussions by faculty, students and visiting scientists. PH.D. Students may take more than once for credit. Up to three credits may be applied to the M.S. degree programs.

CHEM 6787 Problem Seminar In Biochemistry: 1 semester hour

Prerequisite: Consent of the biochemistry staff. Problems from the current literature, presentations and discussions by faculty, students and visiting scientists. Ph.D. students may take more than once for credit. Up to three credits may be applied to the M.S. degree program.

CHEM 6812 Introduction To Graduate Study In Chemistry: 1 semester hour

Prerequisite: Consent of Graduate Advisor. Topics to be covered include: techniques of teaching of chemistry in colleges and universities, methods of instruction and evaluation; role and responsibilities of the Graduate Teaching Assistant in laboratory instruction; safety in the undergraduate laboratory, safety practices, emergency procedures; selection of a research project and thesis advisor.

CHEM 6822 Introduction To Graduate Research In Chemistry: 1 semester hour

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Topics to include: safety in the research laboratory, safety practices, emergency procedures, hazardous materials, waste disposal, radiation safety; research ethics, chemistry information retrieval, computer assisted information retrieval, types of databases, searching bibliographic data bases.

CHEM 6832 Strategies for Independent Research Proposal Development: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: CHEM 6822 and Consent of Graduate Advisor. Topics include: strategies for identification of research topics in chemistry and biochemistry, techniques for database literature search, critical analysis of existing research knowledge, introduction to standard grant proposal formats, technical aspects in preparation of a research plan and accompanying sections, use of bibliographical software, and overview and practice of the peer review process.

CHEM 6897 Chemistry Colloquium: 1 semester hour

Presentation of papers by students, faculty and invited speakers. One hour per week.

CHEM 6905 Graduate Research In Chemistry: 1-10 semester hours

Christopher D. Spilling
Professor and Chairperson
Ph.D., The University of Technology, Loughborough, UK

Thomas F. George
Professor and Chancellor
Ph.D., Yale University

Alexei V. Demchenko
Curators' Professor
Ph.D. , Zelinsky Institute for Organic Chemistry, Moscow

James Bashkin
Professor
Ph.D., Oxford University, UK

James S. Chickos
Professor
Ph.D., Cornell University

Cynthia M. Dupureur
Professor and Director of Biochem/Biotech Program
Ph.D., Ohio State University

Wesley R. Harris
Professor
Ph.D., Texas A. and M. University

James J. O'Brien
Professor
Ph.D., Australian National University

Keith J. Stine
Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

George Gokel
Distinguished Professor and Director of the Center for Nanoscience
Ph.D., University of Southern California

Eike Bauer
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany

Alicia M. Beatty
Associate Professor
Ph.D., Washington University

Valerian T. D'Souza
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Detroit

Stephen M. Holmes
Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies
Ph.D., University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign

Michael R. Nichols
Associate Professor
Ph.D., Purdue University

Janet B. Wilking
Associate Professor
Ph.D., Washington University

Chung F. Wong
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Chicago

Zhi Xu
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh

Ben Bythell
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. , Oregon State University

Nigam P. Rath
Research Professor
Ph.D., Oklahoma State University

Rensheng Luo
Research Associate Professor
Ph.D., Wahan Institute of Physics and Mathematics Chinese Academy of Sciences

Bruce Hamper
Teaching Assistant Professor
Ph.D., University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign

Anthony Mannino
Adjunct Associate Professor
Ph.D., Ohio State University

John Gutweiler
Lecturer
Ph.D., Saint Louis University

Lawrence Barton
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., University of Liverpool

David W. Larsen
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., Northwestern University

Joyce Y. Corey
Professor Emerita
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin

Harold H. Harris
Founder's Associate Professor
Ph.D., Michigan State University

David L. Garin
Associate Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., Iowa State University

Rudolph E.K. Winter
Associate Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University

Jane A. Miller
Associate Professor Emerita
Ph.D., Tulane University

Joseph Kramer
Technical Staff and Spectometrist

Daniel Cranford
Technical Staff, Coordinator and Laboratory Operations

Frank L. May
Technical Staff and Research Investigator

Bruce Burkeen
Technical Staff and Senior Research Engineering Technician