Psychological Sciences

Campus Address: 325 Stadler Hall
Web Site: http://www.umsl.edu/divisions/artscience/psychology/index.html
Main Number: 314-516-5391
Fax Number: 314-516-5392

General Information

Psychology Academic Advising Office

Undergraduate psychology majors and other students interested in majoring or minoring in Psychology should visit an Academic Advisor in the Psychology Academic Advising Office (Stadler 322) to receive specific information on degree requirements and course offerings, discuss questions about career options, and receive information about graduate work in Psychology. All students are encouraged to see a Psychology Academic Advisor regularly throughout their collegiate careers. It is especially important for all students who are within one calendar year of graduation to meet with a Psychology Academic Advisor. Students will minimize waiting time and will be assured one-to-one attention from an Academic Advisor by calling (314) 516-4561 to schedule an appointment. Office hours for Psychology Academic Advising can be obtained by e-mailing: psy_advising@umsl.edu.

Career Outlook

The undergraduate major in Psychology can provide the foundation for further training in psychology at the graduate level, the background necessary for graduate training in other fields such as the health professions, social work or counseling, or the liberal arts background necessary for entry level positions in many fields such as business, communication, and human services and mental health positions. To function specifically as a psychologist, a graduate degree is required. For more career information please schedule an appointment with an Academic Advisor in the Psychology Academic Advising Office (Stadler 322; 314-516-4561; psy_advising@umsl.edu).  For additional information, visit the American Psychological Association website at www.apa.org.

Facilities

The department has several animal and human experimental laboratories furnished with a wide range of psychophysiological equipment. The department also operates three facilities (Community Psychological Services, the Center for Trauma Recovery, and Children’s Advocacy Services of Greater St. Louis) which provide training opportunities for students in Psychology, as well as providing psychological assessment services for citizens of the region.

Program Overview

The Psychology department offers a broad-based curricular plan leading to the Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree in Psychology as well as a minor in the field.  There are several certificates that can be earned through the department including an undergraduate certificate in neuroscience and an undergraduate and a graduate certificate in trauma studies.  The department also offers a terminal Master of Arts in Psychology, with a specialization in either Industrial/Organizational Psychology or Behavioral Neuroscience.  The department offers three options within its Ph.D. Program: Clinical Psychology; Behavioral Neuroscience; and Industrial/Organizational Psychology.  Finally, the department offers a Clinical Psychology Respecialization-Advanced Graduate Certificate Program.  This program is designed for individuals who already have a doctoral degree in Psychology who wish to receive specialty training in Clinical Psychology.

Undergraduate Programs

General Education Requirements

Majors must satisfy the university and college General Education curricular requirements. Selected courses in Psychology may be used to meet General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences and/or Valuing requirements. These courses are listed here in The Bulletin and can be found on the Degree Audit Report System.

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology

At least 34, but no more than 45, hours must be completed in courses taught by or cross-listed with the Psychology Department. Credits that exceed the 45 hour maximum in Psychology will not be counted toward graduation. Candidates must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher in the major overall, and must earn a C- or above in each of the courses comprising the 34 credits required of all Psychology majors. Failure to earn a C- or above in these required courses will necessitate re-taking them for a satisfactory completion of the C- requirement in all 34 hours. It is recommended that students complete the prerequisites necessary to start taking the Psychological Statistics (PSYCH 2201) and Research Methods (PSYCH 2219) course sequence as early as possible after declaring a Psychology major. Psychological Statistics and Research Methods are 2000-level courses; it is important to complete these when students are taking other 2000-level courses. Students who wait to take these courses are not as prepared for their 3000 and 4000 level courses as are those who take them at the appropriate time. No Psychology courses taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis may be applied to the major.
A grade of C- or above is required by all Psychology majors in the following 34 credit hours of courses:
 

PSYCH 1000, Careers in Psychology (1.0 Credit Hour): Native and transfer students must satisfactorily complete this course during their first semester as a Psychology major at UMSL.
A grade of C- or above is required for Psychology majors taking this course. Psychology majors earning below a C- must repeat this course to earn a satisfactory grade.

PSYCH 1003, General Psychology (3.0 Hrs)

  • A grade of C- or above is required for Psychology majors taking this course. Psychology majors earning below a C- must repeat this course to earn a satisfactory grade

PSYCH 2201 Psychological Statistics (4.0 Hrs): Meeting the University mathematical skills requirement is a prerequisite for this course.

  • Students may register for this course only after satisfactory completion of this requirement.
  • A grade of C- or higher in PSYCH 2201 is required before students may register for PSYCH 2219.A grade of C- or above is required for Psychology majors taking this course.Psychology majors earning below a C- must repeat this course to earn a satisfactory grade.

PSYCH 2211 Introduction to Biological Psychology (3.0 Hrs)

  • PSYCH 1003, and three hours of BIOL chosen from either BIOL 1012BIOL 1102, or BIOL 1831 are prerequisites of this course and must be completed before enrollment.A grade of C- or above is required for Psychology majors taking this course. Psychology majors earning below a C- must repeat this course to earn a satisfactory grade.

PSYCH 2219 Research Methods (3.0 Hrs)

  •  A grade of C- or above in PSYCH 2201 at UMSL is a prerequisite of this course. Students may not register for PSYCH 2219 until a final grade of C- or above has been earned in PSYCH 2201. Students wishing to have statistics courses from other institutions reviewed for possible course equivalency must see the Director of Academic Advising for the Department of Psychology for a review.PSYCH 2201 and PSYCH 2219 cannot be takenconcurrently.
  • A grade of C- or above is required for Psychology majors taking this course.Psychology majors earning below a C- must repeat this course to earn a satisfactory grade.

PSYCH 2245 Abnormal Psychology (3.0 Hrs)

  • A grade of C- or above in PSYCH 1003 is a prerequisite for this course. A grade of C- or above is required for Psychology majors taking this course. Psychology majors earning below a C- must repeat this course to earn a satisfactory grade. PSYCH 2160, Social Psychology (3) *OR*PSYCH 2270, Developmental Psychology: Infancy, Childhood & Adolescence (3)A grade of C- or above in PSYCH 1003 is a prerequisite for taking either of these courses. A grade of C- or above is required for Psychology majors in at least one of these two courses. Psychology majors earning below a C- must either repeat the course in which the unsatisfactory grade was earned, or satisfactorily complete the other course listed here.

PSYCH 4999, Integrated Psychology (2.0 Hrs)

  • Students may register for this course during their final semester of study at UMSL.
  • A grade of C- or above is required for Psychology majors taking this course.Psychology majors earning below a C- must repeat this course to earn a satisfactory grade. PSYCH 3000/4000 level Psychology courses (12). At least four additional totaling a minimum of 12 credit hours in Psychology (in addition to the 2 credits earned PSYCH 4999) must be satisfactorily completed at the 3000/4000 level.
  • A grade of C- or above is required by all Psychology majors in a total of 12 credit hours of 3000/4000 level Psychology courses.Psychology majors earning below a C- must either repeat courses in order to earn a C- or above in 12 hours at this level, or satisfactorily complete other 3000/4000 level courses for satisfactory completion of a cumulative total of 12 hours.

Additional Notes

Psychology majors must not take courses in excess of 45 hours in Psychology. Psychology credits completed in excess of 45 will not count toward graduation. For example, students earning 48 hours in Psychology will consequently be required to earn a minimum of 123 hours to graduate.

The three course sequence of Math, Psychological Statistics (PSYCH 2201), and Research Methods (PSYCH 2219) require a minimum of three semesters to complete. Students must satisfy the current University mathematical skills requirement before taking PSYCH 2201, Psychological Statistics. PSYCH 2201 is a prerequisite for PSYCH 2219, and hence, PSYCH 2201 must be completed with a grade of C- or higher PRIOR to enrollment in PSYCH 2219. PSYCH 2201 and PSYCH 2219 cannot be taken concurrently. Students are advised to plan accordingly and to seek assistance from Psychology Academic Advising whenever needed.

Students are required to satisfactorily complete 13 credit hours in one foreign language.

Requirements for the Minor

Candidates must complete a minimum of 15 hours of courses taught by or cross-listed with the Psychology Department, including at least 6 hours at the 3000 or 4000 level (no more than 3 of these can be PSYCH 3390). Candidates must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher in the minor. Psychology courses taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis may not be applied to the minor.

Undergraduate Certificate in Trauma Studies

The trauma studies certificate is designed for students who are interested in a focused specialty in trauma studies or victim services in addition to their own major. It is appropriate for students in the College of Arts and Sciences or any of the schools of the university. It is particularly appropriate for students wishing to pursue careers in psychology, social work, sociology, criminology, law, public health, or nursing.

Requirements

A student may earn a trauma studies certificate by completing 18 hours with a GPA of 2.0 or better from at least three departments from the following courses:

Select at least four of the following:12
Criminology and Criminal Justice
Criminal Law
Communities And Crime
Victimology
Psychology
Psychology Of Trauma
Directed Studies (for three credits only toward certificate) 1
Social Work
Introduction To Strategies for Social Work Practice
Abused And Neglected Children
Child Welfare Practicum Seminar
Sociology
Sociology Of Victimization
Select up to two of the following:6
Criminology and Criminal Justice
Crime Prevention
Policing
Race, Crime, And Justice
Political Science
Public Administration
Introduction To Public Policy
Psychology
Social Psychology
Psychology Of Gender
Abnormal Psychology
Social Work
Gender Issues in Social Work
Sociology
Introduction To Gender Studies
Social Psychology
The Sociology Of Conflict
Race, Crime, And Justice
Total Hours18

1

Please seek approval of the Coordinator of the Trauma Studies Certificate in advance

Special Topics courses relevant to trauma studies may be included in the certificate when approved in advance by the coordinator of the trauma studies certificate.

Graduate School Preparation

In addition to the required courses listed above, students interested in applying to graduate school in Psychology are strongly encouraged to become involved in a research project with a Psychology faculty member by securing enrollment in PSYCH 3390, Directed Studies. These positions are available on a limited and competitive basis. No enrollments in PSYCH 3390 are possible without special Instructor permission. Those invited to participate must obtain a special consent form from the instructor in order to enroll. Contact the Psychology Academic Advising office for more information on such positions (psy_advising@umsl.edu).

Undergraduate Learning Outcomes

The Undergraduate Psychology Learning Goals and Outcomes represent reasonable departmental expectations for the psychology major at the University of Missouri-St Louis. They have been modified from the undergraduate learning goals recommended by the American Psychological Association.

Outcome 1. Recommended Courses for General Knowledge Base of Psychology

  • Students will demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology.
  • PSYCH 1003 introduces these concepts; all other psychology courses expand on these issues in more depth.

Goal 2. Research Methods in Psychology

  • Students will understand basic research methods in psychology, including the development and refinement of theory, hypothesis generation and testing, research design, data analysis and interpretation.
  • All courses touch on these issues, but two required courses, PSYCH 2201 and PSYCH 2219 specifically address these issues in depth. In addition, students may take elective courses to strengthen their skills in this area.

Goal 3. Biological and Cognitive Approaches to Understanding Behavior

  • Students will have a basic understanding of the biological basis of behavior and cognitive theory and research in psychology.
  • The following courses specifically address this goal:
  • PSYCH 2211Introduction To Biological Psychology3
    PSYCH 4349Human Learning And Memory3
    PSYCH 4356Cognitive Processes3

Goal 4. Application of Psychology to Personal Development and Mental Health.

  • Students will understand and apply psychological principles to personal development and mental health.
  • Many psychology courses have a specific application to the personal development and mental health of students and their families, including:
PSYCH 2232Psychology Of Trauma3
PSYCH 2245Abnormal Psychology3
PSYCH 2270Developmental Psychology: Infancy, Childhood And Adolescence3
PSYCH 2280Psychology Of Death And Dying3
PSYCH 3340Clinical Problems Of Childhood3
PSYCH 3346Introduction To Clinical Psychology3
PSYCH 4305Developmental Psychology: Cognitive Development of Children3
PSYCH 4316Developmental Psychology: Social Development of Children and Adolescents3
PSYCH 4376Mental Health And Aging3

Goal 5. Application of Psychology to Social and Organizational Issues

  • Students will understand and apply psychology principles of social and organizational issues, including understanding and respect for cultural diversity.
  • The following courses address this goal:
PSYCH 2160Social Psychology3
PSYCH 2222Group Processes In Organizations3
PSYCH 2230Psychology Of Gender3
PSYCH 3318Industrial And Organizational Psychology3
PSYCH 4311Psychology Of Nonverbal Behavior3

Goal 6. Values in Psychology and Critical Thinking

  • Students will be able to weigh evidence, tolerate ambiguity, act ethically, and reflect other values that are the underpinnings of psychology as a discipline. Students will also learn to use critical thinking in evaluating research and other types of information.
  • All courses are relevant to this goal.

Goal 7. Information and Technological Literacy

  • Students will demonstrate information competence and the ability to use computers and other technology for many purposes.
  • PSYCH 2201 and PSYCH 2219 addresses these topics in considerable detail.

Goal 8. Communication Skills

  • Students will be able to communicate effectively in a variety of formats.
  • All courses provide some training in communication skills, with initial skills reinforced in upper division courses.

Goal 9. Career Planning and Development

  • Students will emerge from the major with realistic ideas about how to implement their psychological knowledge, skills, and values in occupational pursuits in a variety of settings.
  • PSYCH 1000 and PSYCH 1003 addresses this goal directly.

Graduate Programs

Admission Requirements

In addition to meeting the general admission requirements of the Graduate School, applicants should have completed undergraduate courses at minimum in general psychology, psychological statistics, and research methods. Each doctoral program has additional admission requirements specific to that program.

Applications

Each program has independent deadlines for completed applications. They are as follows:

Ph.D. in Psychology:

  • Clinical Psychology--December 15
  • Industrial/Organizational Psychology--January 15
  • Behavioral Neuroscience --January 15

Teaching and Research Assistantships.

Stipends for teaching and research assistantships are available for the doctoral programs only.

Master of Arts in Psychology

The psychology department at the University of Missouri-St. Louis offers a program of studies leading to the Master of Arts degree with a specialization in either Behavioral Neuroscience or Industrial/Organizational Psychology. The M.A. degree is a terminal degree and is separate from the Ph.D. program in Psychology. There is no thesis or language requirement. The M.A. degree does not constitute a license to practice in Missouri or elsewhere as a professional Psychologist. The M.A. program does not offer course work in Counseling or Clinical Psychology.

The M.A. in Psychology requires a total of 32 semester hours of graduate course work in Behavioral Neuroscience or 45 semester hours of course work in Industrial/Organizational Psychology. All students in the Master's program must take the course work prescribed by their emphasis area. All programs of study for M.A. students require the approval of the Director of the Behavioral Neuroscience program or Director of the Industrial/Organization program. 

Emphasis in Behavioral Neuroscience Psychology

(pending CBHE approval)

The University of Missouri-St. Louis offers a program of studies leading to a Master of Arts Degree in Psychology with a specialization in Behavioral Neuroscience. Masters students take classes with Doctoral level students and conduct research in a core area of study including hormones and behaviorpsychophysiology of trauma, neuropsychology and neuroimaging of aging and HIV, brain dysregulation in language disorders, social neuroscience of bias and stigma or neurobiology of emotion.

Students are enrolled into a research group headed by a faculty member with research interests in one of the six areas identified above.  That professor serves as the student’s primary mentor throughout their graduate training, though communication and collaboration with other laboratories are encouraged.  

Research Facilities:  Research facilities include a variety of resources to support animal models of learning and memory, sociosexual behaviors, neuroendocrinology, and neuropharmacology; assessment of human cognition and neuropsychology; electrophysiology labs and psychophysiology labs to measure electrocardiogram, electrodermal activity, respiration, electromyogram, electrooculogram and infrared video-based equipment for tracking eye movements and pupillary response.

Degree Requirements

A total of 32 credit hours is required for the MA degree with an emphasis in the behavioral neuroscience field of experimental psychology. There is no thesis requirement for the Masters degree.

Required Coursework
The following graduate courses are currently required of all Masters students in the Behavioral Neuroscience emphasis area:
PSYCH 7421Quantitative Methods I4
PSYCH 7422Quantitative Methods II4
PSYCH 5465Seminar: Behavioral Neuroscience3
PSYCH 5407Psychopharmacology3
PSYCH 5468Seminar: Cognitive Processes3
PSYCH 5001Neuropsychological Assessment3
PSYCH 7483Directed Research3
or PSYCH 7484 Directed Readings
Electives9
Choose from among the following or courses approved by graduate director:
Hormones, The Brain And Behavior
Psychopathology
Social Psychology
Quantitative Methods III
Psychometric Theory
Directed Research
Directed Readings
Total Hours32

Students should develop, in collaboration with their graduate faculty advisor/mentor in the Department of Psychology, a useful and compatible set of elective courses fitting their individual career goals and preferences.

Emphasis in Industrial/Organizational Psychology

(pending CBHE approval)

The University of Missouri-St. Louis offers a program of studies leading to a Masters of Arts degree in Psychology with an emphasis in Industrial/Organizational Psychology. This program embraces the scientist-practitioner model and provides a balanced training in I/O. This emphasis provides "industrial" training in areas such as personnel selection, training, and test development/validation, as well as "organizational" training in areas such as work motivation, leadership, mentoring, and group processes. Conducting research with faculty and other training experiences are also incorporated. Masters students take 45 hours of courses. Completion of the Masters program does not qualify one for admittance to the doctoral program. Masters students must reapply for consideration to the doctoral program. Additionally, Masters students are not required to complete an empirical research thesis.

PSYCH 5468Seminar: Cognitive Processes3
PSYCH 7412Social Psychology3
PSYCH 7421Quantitative Methods I4
PSYCH 7422Quantitative Methods II4
PSYCH 7449Research Methods and Project Development In Applied Psychology3
PSYCH 7454Seminar: Personnel Psychology3
PSYCH 7455Seminar: Organizational Psychology3
PSYCH 7457Seminar: Special Topics In Industrial Psychology3
PSYCH 7458Seminar: Special Topics In Organizational Psychology3
PSYCH 7466Seminar Series in Industrial/Organizational Psychology4
MGMT 5611Advanced Organizational Behavior And Administrative Processes3
MGMT 5621Managing Human Resources3
MGMT 5625Selected Topics In Human Resource Management3
Electives3
Choose one of the following:
Psychometric Theory
I/O Professional Issues And Ethics
Quantitative Methods III
Applied Issues In Organizational Psychology
Special Topics In Psychology
Total Hours45

Description of Ph.D. Programs/Options

There are three distinct programs:

  • Clinical Psychology;
  • Behavioral Neuroscience; and
  • Industrial/Organizational Psychology.

Details on each program can be found on the Psychology Department webpage. Each has its own specific curricular and research requirements. The following briefly describes each program.

Clinical Psychology

The Clinical Psychology program has been fully accredited by the American Psychological Association since 1977 and is patterned upon the scientist-practitioner model of clinical training. The Clinical Psychology program requires five years of full-time study. Students are not considered for admission on a part-time basis. Through the medium of courses, practicums, and research experiences, this emphasis area prepares Clinical Psychologists for careers in research, teaching, and clinical practice.

Students in the Clinical Psychology program participate for three years in the Psychology Department's Community Psychological Services clinic. This facility provides psychological services to the public and consultation to outside agencies. Students also receive clinical experience in clerkships and during a full-time, year-long internship. Research requirements include an initial independent research project, a major critical review of research in a specialty area, and a dissertation.

Learning Outcomes for the Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology:

The Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology has the following goals and outcomes:

Goal 1. Students will gain a broad-based foundation of knowledge and conceptual skills necessary for psychological research and practice.

The following courses address this goal:

PSYCH 5465Seminar: Behavioral Neuroscience3
PSYCH 5468Seminar: Cognitive Processes3
PSYCH 6466Seminar: Developmental Psychology1-3
PSYCH 7403Psychopathology3
PSYCH 7412Social Psychology3

Students will be prepared in multiple approaches to assessment and treatment that are theory-based and research-supported.

The following courses address this goal directly:

PSYCH 7404Introduction To Clinical Assessment I4
PSYCH 7406Introduction To Clinical Assessment II4
PSYCH 7430Introduction To Clinical Skills1
PSYCH 7431Clinical Supervision1-3
PSYCH 7434Introduction to Clinical Interventions3
PSYCH 7439Summer Supervision1
PSYCH 7450Clinical Internship I1
PSYCH 7451Clinical Internship II1

Goal 2. Students will develop the ability to evaluate and conduct methodologically sound research of potential benefit to the practice of psychology.

The following courses address this goal directly:

PSYCH 7421Quantitative Methods I4
PSYCH 7422Quantitative Methods II4
PSYCH 7474Clinical Research In Applied Settings3
PSYCH 7485Research Team I2
PSYCH 7486Research Team II2
PSYCH 7487Thesis Research Project1-6
PSYCH 7488Specialty Examination Research1-6
PSYCH 7492Ph D Thesis Research1-10

In addition, students must submit a journal-length manuscript based on their dissertation for review by a professional journal prior to graduation.

Goal 3. Students will develop a firm basis for ethical decision-making and adherence to professional standards of conduct in research and practice.

Most courses provide some training in this area, and PSYCH 7432 addresses this goal directly as a required course.

Goal 4. Students will develop and display sensitivity and adaptability in their applications of research, assessment and treatment approaches to diverse populations.

Most courses provide some training in this area, and PSYCH 6448 addresses this goal directly as a required course.

Goal 5. Students will continue to develop a commitment to the goals of life-long learning, and an awareness of clinical psychology as an evolving science.

All courses are relevant to this goal.

Behavioral Neuroscience

The Behavioral Neuroscience program provides opportunities for study, research, and training in various areas including psychophysiology, psychopharmacology, neuroendocrinology, cognitive neuroscience, and neuropsychology. This program prepares students for research careers in academia or industries, such as pharmaceutical firms and medical schools. Full-time enrollment is required.

Learning Outcomes for the Ph.D. in Behavioral Neuroscience

The graduate program in Behavioral Neuroscience has the following goals. Outcome measures for each goal allow the faculty to assess the students.

Goal 1. Students will gain a broad-based foundation of terminology and basic and conceptual knowledge necessary for teaching and research in the Behavioral Neuroscience field. Outcome measures include grades in coursework, performance on both the written and oral segments of the qualifying exam, as well as active participation in our journal reading groups.

Goal 2. Beginning early in their studies, students will learn the basic skills to conduct research in a variety of different paradigms. Outcome measures include successful accomplishments in the laboratories of mentor professors.

Goal 3. Beginning early in their studies, students will come to recognize the key to success in the Behavioral Neuroscience field is publishing and seeking grant support. Outcome measures include an easily observable mindset that assesses all scholarly activities in regard to possible publication and/ or a suitable idea for submission to a grant agency. Also, regular attendance is expected at all relevant colloquia on campus and at the grant writing seminars offered by the Behavioral Neuroscience faculty.

Goal 4. Students will come to recognize the importance of writing and will be constantly developing their writing skills as applied to manuscript preparations and grant applications. Outcome measures are the numbers of manuscripts written and submitted to journals or grant agencies each year.

Goal 5. As they progress through the program, students will show increasing self-reliance to initiate a research project and carry it to its completion. Outcome measures are numbers and quality of self-initiated research projects.

Goal 6. At the end of their graduate studies, the students will have grown into full colleagues of the faculty and be ready for careers in research and teaching. Outcome measures are a quality dissertation that is successfully defended before peers and being hired for a suitable position (post-doc, assistant professor, junior-level researcher) in the field.

Industrial/Organizational Psychology

The Industrial/Organizational Psychology program is offered in cooperation with selected faculty from the College of Business to prepare students for careers in industry or academia. This program embraces the scientist-practitioner model and provides a balanced training in I/O. This emphasis provides "industrial" training in areas such as personnel selection, training, and test development/validation, as well as "organizational" training in areas such as work motivation, leadership, and group processes. Research and other training experiences in various settings are also incorporated.

Learning Outcomes for the Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology:

The Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational (IO) Psychology has the following goals:

Goal 1. Students will gain a broad-based foundation of knowledge and conceptual skills necessary for applied psychological research and practice.

Goal 2. Students will develop the ability to evaluate and conduct methodologically sound research of potential benefit to the theory and practice of psychology.

Goal 3. Students will develop the ability to apply psychological principles that are theory-based and research-supported to individuals and groups in organizational settings.

Goal 4. Students will develop a firm basis for ethical decision-making in research and practice.

Goal 5. Students will display adaptability in their applications of research, assessment and practical psychological approaches to individuals and groups in organizational settings.

Graduate Certificate Programs

Clinical Psychology Respecialization-Advanced Graduate Certificate Program

This program is designed for graduates of accredited doctoral programs in psychology who wish to receive training in the specialty field of clinical psychology. Respecialization students are trained within the context of the UMSL Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program, which is accredited by the American Psychological Association. The program provides an integrated sequence of training experiences, including didactic course work and practicum placements. Core graduate-level psychology educational requirements not completed elsewhere are included in the respecialization student's course of study.

Graduate Certificate in Trauma Studies

The graduate certificate is awarded upon the completion of 18 credit hours of graduate coursework on the topic of trauma studies. No more than nine hours of graduate level independent research or fieldwork may be used for the certificate. The coursework for the certificate must be taken in at least two departments and may include no more than three hours at the undergraduate 3000 or 4000 level.

Sample Four Year Plan 

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
INTDSC 100311PSYCH 22113
PSYCH 10033PSYCH 22014
ENGL 11003General Education23
MATH 10203Foreign Language 10015
PSYCH 10001 
BIOL 10123 
 14 15
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
PSYCH 22193PSYCH 2160 or 22703
Foreign Language 10025Foreign Language 21013
General Education6General Education 9
PSYCH 22453 
 17 15
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
General Education 6General Education 9
PSYCH 3000-4000+ level course3PSYCH 3000-4000+ level course6
Elective or minor3 
ENGL 31003 
 15 15
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
Elective or minor3Elective or minor12
PSYCH 3000-4000+ level course6PSYCH 49992
General Education6 
 15 14
Total Hours: 120
1

INTDSC 1003 is required only for first-time freshmen and transfer students with less than 24 college credits

2

The general education courses listed assumes the U.S. History/Government requirement is fulfilled with a Social/Behavioral Science or Humanities general education course.

Please Note: This plan is an example of what a four year plan could look like for a typical student. Placement exam scores in math as well as the completion of coursework may change the plan. It should not be used in the place of regular academic advising appointments. All students are encouraged to meet with their advisor each semester. All requirements are subject to change.

Child Advocacy Studies Courses

CAST 3290 Traumatic Stress in Childhood and Adolescence: 3 semester hours

SAME AS PSYCH 3290. Prerequisites: PSYCH 2270 (majors), PSYCH 1268, or approval from the instructor. Exploration of the impact of stressors experienced during infancy, childhood and adolescence. Integrates how theoretical frameworks, cultural considerations and policy implications apply to child development research and practice.

CAST 4398 Child Maltreatment: A Multidisciplinary Approach: 3 semester hours

SAME AS PSYCH 4398 and SOC WK 4398. Focuses on clinical aspects of child abuse with attention to identification, reporting, intervention and prevention. Perspectives from the disciplines of psychology and social work are provided.

CAST 4498 Forensic Investigation of Child Abuse: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CAST 4398/PSYCH 4398/SOC WK 4398. Designed for students across multiple disciplines where knowledge of child abuse investigation and advocacy are necessary. Focuses on the investigative and prosecutorial responses of professionals involved with child abuse cases to expand the student’s knowledge and skills in the most effective response to child abuse investigations. Includes competency-based skills training such as conducting a cursory interview, participating in peer review, doing case presentations, and producing investigative documentation.

CAST 4598 Child Abuse Assessment and Intervention: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: CAST 4398/PSYCH 4398/SOC WK 4398. Provides students with knowledge and skills to intervene effectively and empathically with families that experience child abuse and neglect. Uses experiential learning to develop skills in trauma-focused screening, assessment, and crisis intervention for vulnerable children and their families who are involved with child serving systems such as law enforcement, child protective services, prosecution, and physical and mental health.

CAST 4698 Internship in Child Advocacy Studies: 3 semester hours

SAME AS PSYCH 4698. Prerequisites: PSYCH 4398, completion of or concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 4498 and PSYCH 4598, and approval from the CAST director. Internship under CAST staff supervision in child or youth-serving setting. Monthly seminar participation required. Approval from the CAST director is required prior to enrolling.

Psychology Courses

PSYCH 1000 Choosing A Career In Psychology: 1 semester hour

Prerequisite: Psychology Major or consent of instructor. This course is an orientation to the field of psychology for majors and for students who are considering declaring the major. This course is to be completed by native and transfer Psychology majors during their first semester of study at UMSL. Students will be engaged in activities that will help them to develop and identify their professional goals, learn about the various specialties and careers available within the field of psychology, understand the education and skills necessary for various careers, learn the requirements for a psychology major, become familiar with minors that are available at UMSL, think about a possible choice of minor or certificate, and become acquainted with the interest areas of UMSL faculty in Psychology and related fields. All Psychology majors must complete this course during the first semester at UMSL with a grade of C- or higher.

PSYCH 1003 General Psychology: 3 semester hours

A survey of the basic concepts, theories, and pivotal findings over the past 100 years in the science of Psychology, with special emphasis on contemporary concepts and findings that focus on the relation of the brain to normal and pathological behaviors. All Psychology majors must complete this course with a grade of C- or higher.

PSYCH 1268 Human Growth And Development: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 1003. A survey course, designed for non-majors. This course examines development over the lifespan with an emphasis on the developmental tasks and hazards of each age period. Majors in Psychology and students planning to pursue a career in psychology research, teaching, or practice are strongly encouraged to take PSYCH 2270 instead of this course.

PSYCH 2160 Social Psychology: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC 2160. Prerequisite: PSYCH 1003 or SOC 1010. This course examines the behavior, thoughts, and feelings of individuals in their social environments. The content focuses not only on how people relate to one another, but also on the processes affecting their interactions with others. Specific topics include the self, social judgments, attitudes and persuasion, helping behavior, prejudice, aggression, attraction, conformity and obedience, and group processes. All Psychology majors taking this course instead of PSYCH 2270 must complete it with a grade of C- or higher.

PSYCH 2200 Drugs And Behavior: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: PSYCH 1003. The course is an introduction to psychopharmacology and the relationship among drugs, and how these impact the brain and behavior. The emphasis is on physiological mechanisms underlying the behavioral responses to psychotherapeutic substances, illicit psychoactive drugs, commonly used substances (alcohol, nicotine, caffeine), and drug-like substances produced naturally in the body.

PSYCH 2201 Psychological Statistics: 4 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 1003 and satisfaction of the University's mathematical skills requirement. (With Laboratory) This course serves as an introduction to statistical concepts and methods used in Psychological measurement and the analysis and interpretation of social sciences data. Topics include descriptive statistics, frequency distributions centrality, variability, and correlational measures; as well as an introduction to statistical inference, sampling fundamentals, significance testing and effect size, t-test, and analysis of variance. All Psychology majors must complete this course with a grade of C- or higher before registering for PSYCH 2219.

PSYCH 2205 Human Sexuality: Psychological Perspectives: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 1003. This course is a comprehensive overview of human sexuality from the standpoint of the behavioral science of Psychology. This course includes a study of sexual anatomy and physiology, intersex classifications, sex and gender differences, sexual orientation, interpersonal and interpersonal aspects of human sexuality, classification and treatment of sexual dysfunction and sexual disorders, sexual victimization, and the methods employed for the scientific examination of human sexual behavior.

PSYCH 2211 Introduction To Biological Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 1003 and 3 hours of BIOL chosen from either BIOL 1012, or BIOL 1102, or BIOL 1831. Students with career goals that include graduate study in Psychology are urged to complete the BIOL 1831 prerequisite for this course. This course introduces psychology students to behavioral neuroscience and neuropsychology. Course topics include basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, neurodevelopment, sensory and motor systems, and the integration of subcortical and cortical networks. All are covered with an emphasis on behavioral outcomes of normal and pathological functioning of the brain. All psychology majors must complete this course with a grade of C- or higher.

PSYCH 2219 Research Methods: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Completion of PSYCH 2201 with a final grade of C- or higher is required prior to enrolling in this course. This course is a comprehensive overview of research methods in the social sciences. Topics include technical scientific writing in current APA format, critical evaluation of research literature, the application of statistical methods, and mastery of the ethical principles guiding social sciences research. Course and laboratory work involve designing and evaluating research questions, formulating research hypotheses, designing and conducting original research studies, and presenting research results. All psychology majors must complete this course with a grade of C- or higher.

PSYCH 2222 Group Processes In Organizations: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: PSYCH 1003 or MGMT 3600. Topics Include Theory, Research And Practice In Coordination, Conflict And Decision-Making In Groups And Organizations, As Well As The Role Of Influence, Power, And Leadership Effectiveness In Understanding Interpersonal And Group Relations.

PSYCH 2230 Psychology Of Gender: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 2230. Prerequisite: PSYCH 1003. Evaluation of psychological theories and research regarding physiological, cognitive, and personality gender differences and similarities, gender related problems in adjustment, and gender specific clinical interventions.

PSYCH 2232 Psychology Of Trauma: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 2232. Prerequisites: PSYCH 1003. This course is designed to review the psychological effects of crime, violence, war, natural disasters, and other traumas. Particular attention is paid to the development of specific psychopathology and other negative consequences of traumatic events. The process of recovery from distress following psychological events is further emphasized. The role of gender and its relationship to victimization and the development of psychopathology and recovery are considered throughout the course.

PSYCH 2245 Abnormal Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: PSYCH 1003. This course examines the historical views and current perspectives on the possible antecedents, symptoms, and treatments of major psychological disorders, including anxiety, dissociative, mood, somatoform, eating, schizophrenia and substance-related disorders. Major diagnostic categories and criteria, individual and social factors of maladaptive behavior, methods of clinical assessment, research strategies, and types of therapy will also be covered. All psychology majors must complete this course with a grade of C- or higher.

PSYCH 2270 Developmental Psychology: Infancy, Childhood And Adolescence: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 1003. This course systematically examines theories and research concerning the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of children from conception through adolescence. It will provide students with a basic knowledge of infant, child, and adolescent development; its subject matter; its approaches to gathering and evaluating evidence about the causes of behavior; and the ways in which our knowledge is applied to enhance the development and the quality of life of children. It is intended for Psychology majors and students with career interests in research, education, and/or the treatment of children. All Psychology majors taking this course instead of PSYCH 2160, must complete it with a grade of C- or higher.

PSYCH 2272 Developmental Psychology: Adulthood And Aging: 3 semester hours

Same as GERON 2272. Prerequisite: PSYCH 1003. Personality, social, and physiological development from the onset of early adulthood through maturity and old age.

PSYCH 2280 Psychology Of Death And Dying: 3 semester hours

Same as GERON 2280. Prerequisites: PSYCH 1003. A beginning exploration of end-of-life issues integrating the scholarly, social, and individual dimensionsof death and dying. This course provides a solid grounding in theory and research, as well as practical application to students' lives.

PSYCH 2285 American Culture and Minority Mental Health: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 1003. Provides an examination of the relationship between American culture and mental health. The focus is on the lives of American minority groups, with specific attention given to how racism, prejudice, and minority status currently reveal themselves within a mental health framework. An eclectic, multidisciplinary approach that draws from clinical and social psychology will be utilized.

PSYCH 3205 Evolutionary Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 2211. Evolutionary Psychology refers to a fundamentally unique approach to studying and thinking about human and animal behavior through considerations of 1. The challenges and stressors encountered in ancestral environments, 2. The proximate physical, psychological, and anatomical methods that evolved to meet these adaptive problems, and 3. How adaptive or maladaptive these mechanisms are in current environments. Special emphasis will be placed on the evolution of brain structures, cognitive processes, and social behaviors. The content for this course is not new; Evolutionary Psychology involves looking at the science of Psychology through a unique lens, shaped by its tenets. Although appreciation for this approach to psychological research is increasing, it remains controversial in psychology circles. We will discuss the state of this aspect of Psychology as well.

PSYCH 3256 Environmental Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites:PSYCH 2160 or SOC 2160 Analysis of environmental influences on behavior and man's influence, in turn, on the environment. Topics will include a consideration of both individual processes relating to the environment (such as the perception, evaluation, and adaptation to the environment) and social processes relating to the environment (such as privacy, territoriality, and corwding).

PSYCH 3290 Traumatic Stress in Childhood and Adolescence: 3 semester hours

Same as CAST 3290. Prerequisites: PSYCH 2270 (majors), PSYCH 1268, or approval from the instructor. Exploration of the impact of stressors experienced during infancy, childhood and adolescence. Integrates how theoretical frameworks, cultural considerations and policy implications apply to child development research and practice.

PSYCH 3316 Fundamentals Of Leadership: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 1003 and six additional hours of Psychology, or consent of instructor. This course addresses concepts an methods for developing leadership skills in work and everyday settings. Contemporary approaches to leadership development are reviewed in relation to psychological and organizational theory. This course is designed to be relevant to the wide range of leadership opportunities that arise in work and daily life. Experiential exercises are used to help students discover and develop new leadership skills.

PSYCH 3318 Industrial And Organizational Psychology: 3 semester hours

Same as MGMT 3623. Prerequisite: PSYCH 2201 or MGMT 3600. This course introduces the student to psychological research and theories pertaining to human behavior in the work setting. Topics covered include: selection, performance appraisal, training, leadership, motivation, job statisfaction, and organizational design.

PSYCH 3340 Clinical Problems Of Childhood: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: PSYCH 1003 and six additional hours of Psychology, or consent of instructor. This course will address the clinical disorders and difficulties of children, as well as the causes and the treatment of these disorders. Topics addressed include autism, childhood schizophrenia, conduct disorders, learning disabilities, ADHD, mood disorders, health-related disorders, anxiety disorders, and child maltreatment. Treatments designed for specific use with children, including behavioral, drug and community mental health approaches will be addressed. This course is recommended for those going on to graduate work in psychology.

PSYCH 3346 Introduction To Clinical Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: PSYCH 1003, PSYCH 2245; and three additional hours of Psychology. This course provides a conceptual framework for research, description and understanding of clinical phenomena. Assessment, interviewing, the clinical use of tests and psychological approaches to treatment are also addressed.

PSYCH 3390 Directed Studies: 1-6 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor Directed reading and research. May be repeated for a maximum total of ten hours.

PSYCH 3400 Conceptual and Historical Foundations of Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: PSYCH 1003 and three additional hours of Psychology. This course addresses basic questions about human life debated throughout the history of the West that are present in contemporary Psychology. These include the relation between mind and body, how we know about the world, the nature of morality, and how we think and feel. Greek and Judeo-Christian traditions, and science and religion, have provided distinct, fundamental approaches to how these questions have been asked and answered. This course examines these and related historical, conceptual, and theoretical foundations underlying contemporary Psychology.

PSYCH 3500 Health Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: PSYCH 1003 and three additional hours of Psychology.Health Psychology involves the discipline and principles of psychology and behavior in understanding how the mind, body, and behavior interact in health and disease. Class topics include theoretical foundations of health and illness, health promotion and primary prevention of illness, health enhancing and health damaging behaviors, psychosomatic illness, stress and coping, pain management, and a variety of specific behavior-related medical illnesses (e.g., heart disease, eating disorders, cancer, AIDS).

PSYCH 3820 Cross-Cultural Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 1003 and 9 hours of Psychology The purpose of this course is to present students with a broad theoretical and applied overview of cross-cultural psychology. To this end, the course presents an orientation to the definitions, concepts, theories, and methodologies of crosscultural psychology. Included is an examiniation of cultural and ecological factors and their influences on perceptual and cognitive processes, personality, language, and other psychological variables.

PSYCH 4300 Introduction To Psychopharmacology: Drugs And Mental Illness: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 1003, PSYCH 2211 or PSYCH 2200; PSYCH 2245. The course is designed to provide an introduction to drugs used to treat anxiety disorders, major depression, schizophrenia, and other psychopathologies. The emphasis will be on understanding neural mechanisms related to psychological disorders and to the effectiveness of current drug treatments.

PSYCH 4305 Developmental Psychology: Cognitive Development of Children: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 1003, PSYCH 2270, and Junior standing, or consent of instructor. Data and theory concerned with how children's thinking changes over time. Discussion will include domain-general versus domain-specific theories, social and cultural influences on cognition, gains in memory, attention, problem solving, and metacognition, conceptual development, children's naive theories, schooling, and various definitions and measures of intelligence.

PSYCH 4311 Psychology Of Nonverbal Behavior: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: PSYCH 2160 or PSYCH 2160. This course examines the psychological perspective on the role of nonverbal behavior in social settings. Primary concerns of the course will include an analysis of the functions of nonverbal behavior (e.g., providing information, regulating interaction, expressing intimacy, exercising influence, and managing impressions), factors influencing nonverbal expression (e.g., culture, personality, relationships), and various theoretical views on nonverbal communication. Applications to various problems and settings in everyday life will also be pursued.

PSYCH 4314 Behavioral Neuroscience: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: 9 hours of Psych and/or Biology: PSYCH 2211 is recommended but not required. A neuroscience course focusing on behavioral outcomes of brain function and dysfunction. Emphasis will be on modern research methods with animal models and humans. Topics discussed will include the classic findings in the field, but the emphasis will be on recent findings from human neuropsychology, neuroimaging, cognitive neuroscience, neuropharmacology, and neuroendocrinology.

PSYCH 4316 Developmental Psychology: Social Development of Children and Adolescents: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 1003, PSYCH 2270, and Junior standing, or consent of instructor. This course examines data and theory concerned with social behavior in infants, preschoolers, and school-aged children. Discussion will include emotional regulation; measurement and nature of temperament; the formation and maintenance of attachment relationships; sex-role development; and theories of aggression and the effects of socializing agents such as family, peers, media, and culture on development.

PSYCH 4330 Hormones, The Brain And Behavior: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: 9 hours of Psychology or Biology, including at least one of the following: PSYCH 2200, PSYCH 2211, or PSYCH 4300 or permission of instructor. This course may be taken for graduate credit with permission of the instructor. Historically, hormones have been studied for their role in reproduction, including reproductive physiology and sexual behaviors. It is now clear, however, that the endocrine system actively interacts with brain regions unrelated to reproduction with the result that sex hormones and neuropeptide hormones influence a wide range of behaviors including mood, anxiety, stress responses, cognition, memory, violence, attachment, aging, weight control and athletic prowess. Emphasis of the class is on hormonal contribution both to reproductive and non-reproductive behaviors with special attention paid to gender behavioral differences.

PSYCH 4349 Human Learning And Memory: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Nine hours of psychology or consent of instructor. This course is an introduction to classic and contemporary theories, methodologies, and theoretical perspectives used in the fields of learning and memory. The course will explore the various divisions of memory along with processes involved in the acquisition, retention, and retrieval of information. Some of the specific topics include infantile amnesia, false memory, flashbulb memories, and photographic memory. The course will explore various theories of learning as well as optimal conditions for the long-term retention of information.

PSYCH 4356 Cognitive Processes: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Nine hours of psychology or consent of instructor. This course is an overview of the major topics in cognitive psychology, including perception, visual imagery, attention, memory, knowledge representation and retrieval, language, problem solving, reasoning, judgment, decision making, and intelligence.

PSYCH 4365 Psychological Tests And Measurements: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Grade of C- or above in PSYCH 2201 and PSYCH 2219, or consent of instructor. This course is a survey of the basic principles, research, and theories on testing and measurement of psychological constructs. Students will critically examine several professionally developed tests and learn about the administration, interpretation, and psychometric qualities of each.

PSYCH 4374 Introduction To Clinical Neuropsychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Nine hours of Psychology. An introduction to current theory and practice of clinical neuropsychology with a focus on neuropsychological findings concerning relationships between the brain and behavior. Particular attention is devoted to function, neuroanatomy, neurological syndromes, patterns of brain impairment associated with various medical diseases, and methods of neuropsychological assessment and intervention.

PSYCH 4376 Mental Health And Aging: 3 semester hours

Same GERON 4376 and SOC WK 4376. Prerequisites: 9 hours of psychology, graduate standing, or consent of instructor. (MSW students normally take all foundation courses prior to enrolling in this course.) This course provides a survey of theory and research in mental health issues for older populations, focusing on psychological and social aspects of mental health and impairment. The course details approaches to understanding prevalence, etiology, assessment, and treatment of the psychological disorders most commonly experienced by older adults, including anxiety, depression, delirium, and dementia, among others.

PSYCH 4392 Selected Topics In Psychology: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of psychology and consent of instructor. A seminar of selected issues and methods in psychology. May be repeated once for credit.

PSYCH 4398 Child Maltreatment: A Multidisciplinary Approach: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC WK 4398 and CAST 4398. Focuses on clinical aspects of child abuse with attention to identification, reporting, intervention and prevention. Perspectives from the disciplines of psychology and social work are provided.

PSYCH 4698 Internship in Child Advocacy Studies: 3 semester hours

Same as CAST 4698. Prerequisites: PSYCH 4398, completion of or concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 4498 and PSYCH 4598, and approval from the CAST director. Internship under CAST staff supervision in child or youth-serving setting. Monthly seminar participation required. Approval from the CAST director is required prior to enrolling.

PSYCH 4999 Integrated Psychology: 2 semester hours

Prerequisites: This course is restricted to Psychology majors and must be taken during majors' final semester of study. This capstone course serves as a review of the primary sub-fields of psychology. An advanced general psychology textbook will guide the class through important contemporary topics in behavioral neuroscience, learning and memory, cognition, psychopathologies and their treatments, and developmental and social psychology. The Major Field Aptitude Test in Psychology will serve as the final exam for the course. All Psychology majors must complete this course with a grade of C- or higher.

PSYCH 5001 Neuropsychological Assessment: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admission to Psychology graduate program, or consent of instructor. This graduate level course will review neuroanatomical systems that mediate primary cognitive networks and methods of assessments and interpretation of data. The course will also review common neurological and psychiatric conditions that result in neuropsychological compromise.

PSYCH 5340 Human Neuroanatomy: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admission to graduate program in psychology or consent of instructor. This course provides an overview of brain anatomy for graduate students in psychology and related disciplines. It explores the structure and function of the human nervous system both in health and disease. The course will cover core concepts from cellular neuroscience, neuroimaging and neuroanatomical techniques, sensory and motor systems, and the anatomical basis of cognitive functions.

PSYCH 5400 Seminar: Special Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in behavioral neuroscience or consent of the instructor. A seminar of selected contemporary topics in behavioral neuroscience. The class will meet weekly to discuss a journal article in the field with special focus on the methodologies used in neuroscience research. May be repeated for a total of 3 credit hours, provided the subject matter is different.

PSYCH 5407 Psychopharmacology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: 12 units of graduate-level An examination of the effects of drugs on the brain and on behavior. Primary emphasis is on those drugs used in the treatment of affective disorders, schizophrenia and anxiety.

PSYCH 5465 Seminar: Behavioral Neuroscience: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Behavioral neuroscience is the study of the relation of the brain to behavior. The field has emerged as the new face of psychology; there are few subfields in psychology that have not been influenced by findings from animal labs, and from human studies employing physiological recordings, neuroimaging and psychotherapeutic drugs. This course will serve as an introduction for graduate students in psychology of brain morphology and function with an emphasis on normal and pathological behaviors.

PSYCH 5468 Seminar: Cognitive Processes: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admission to the Graduate Program in Psychology or consent of instructor. This course is an introduction to classic and contemporary theories, methodologies, and theoretical perspectives used in the field of cognitive psychology. The emphasis is on basic research in the field of cognitive psychology but some applications of these experiments are discussed as well. The class will read and discuss chapters from cognitive psychology textbooks as well as classic and contemporary empirical journal articles in cognitive Psychology.

PSYCH 5610 Mechanisms Of Aging I: The Aging Body: 1 semester hour

Same as SOC WK 5610 and GERON 5610. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and BIOL 1102 or equivalent. (MSW students normally take all foundation courses prior to enrolling in this course.) Introduces students with a social sciences/humanities background to the normal changes in the biology and chemistry of the aging human body and how these changes affect behavior.

PSYCH 5611 Mechanisms Of Aging II: The Aging Brain: 1 semester hour

Same as SOC WK 5611 and GERON 5611. Prerequisites: GERON 5610 or SOC WK 5610 or PSYCH 5610 or equivalent or consent of instructor. (MSW students normally take all foundation courses prior to enrolling in this course.) Provides students with a social sciences/humanities background a basic introduction to the biology and chemistry of the aging human brain and nervous system and how these systems impact behavior.

PSYCH 5612 Mechanisms Of Aging III: Diseases Of Aging: 1 semester hour

Same as SOC WK 5612 and GERON 5612. Prerequisites: GERON 5610 and GERON 5611, or SOC WK 5610 and SOC WK 5611, or PSYCH 5610 and PSYCH 5611 or equivalent or consent of instructor. (MSW students normally take all foundation courses prior to enrolling in this course). Provides students with a social sciences/humanities background with the information on how diseases associated with aging exacerbate the effects of aging on the human body, mind, and behavior.

PSYCH 6415 Seminar in Health Psychology & Behavioral Medicine: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. This course analyzes research, theory, and clinical applications in the interrelationships of behavior, psychological states, physical health and disease. Discussion includes theoretical foundations of health and illness, biopsychosocial factors affecting health and illness, diagnostic issues, prevention, Interdisciplinary treatment applications, health and public policy, and research issues. Critical evaluation of theory and empirical support for clinical applications will be discussed.

PSYCH 6441 Aging And Health Behavior: 3 semester hours

Same as GERON 6441. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course examines sociocultural influences on health care practices of older adults. The role of social support and other social resources in the health behavior of older adults is emphasized. Topics include self care decisions, formal service utilization, family caregiving, and planned interventions for older adults.

PSYCH 6448 Multicultural Issues In Clinical Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admission to the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology or consent of instructor. A survey of theoretical perspectives utilized in the treatment of various cultural groups. Their relationship to and implications for the treatment of members of various cultural groups will be explored. Strategies and ethical concerns in diagnosis, test interpretation, and treatment are considered.

PSYCH 6466 Seminar: Developmental Psychology: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admission to the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology or consent of instructor. A critical examination of contemporary problems in developmental psychology.

PSYCH 7403 Psychopathology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Admission To Clinical Psychology Program Or Permission Of Instructor. A Critical Examination Of The Clinical-Experimental Literature In Psycholopathology. Etiologies Of Cognitive/Affective Functions And Dysfunctions Are Explored, And Implications For Therapeutic Interventions Are Considered.

PSYCH 7404 Introduction To Clinical Assessment I: 4 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admission to Clinical Psychology program. Fundementals of clinical assessment with emphasis on interviewing and the measurement of cognitive functioning. This course includes a laboratory.

PSYCH 7405 History And Systems In Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admission to Clinical Psychology program or consent of instructor. A comprehensive overview of the history of psychology with emphasis on the systems of thought that have shaped contemporary psychological theory and research.

PSYCH 7406 Introduction To Clinical Assessment II: 4 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 7404. This course addresses theory and techniques of personality assessment including clinical interviewing, objective and projective assessment, and integrative report writing.

PSYCH 7410 Women And Mental Health: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 6410. Prerequisites: Admission to the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology or consent of instructor. This course will focus on contemporary research on the psychology of women pertaining to mental health issues. Etiology and treatment of disorders disproportionately affecting women will be emphasized.

PSYCH 7412 Social Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admittance to psychology doctoral program or consent of instructor. A review of key areas in contemporary theory and research in social psychology.

PSYCH 7419 Existential Issues In Clinical Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admission to the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology or consent of instructor. This course will review existential thought in psychology and its application to understanding clinical problems and treatment. Particular attention will be given to how psychotherapy can be understood within an existential framework that focuses on the issues of death, freedom, responsibility, and isolation.

PSYCH 7421 Quantitative Methods I: 4 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admission to the Graduate Program in Psychology or consent of instructor. A comprehensive study of univariate statistical concepts and analyses used in psychological research. Topics include descriptive statistics, normal distributions, z, t, F, chi-square statistics, and distributions. Correlation, simple and multiple regression, factorial and repeated measures analysis of variance, significance testing and effect size are also examined.

PSYCH 7422 Quantitative Methods II: 4 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 7421 and consent of instructor (With laboratory) A comprehensive study of the use of multivariate statistics in data analysis. Topics include the general linear model, multiple regression, factor analysis, and multivariate analysis of variance.

PSYCH 7423 Quantitative Methods III: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 7422 and PSYCH 7429 and consent of instructor. A selective study of the use of multivariate statistics in data analysis. Topics include structural equation modeling, multilevel modeling, and analysis of longitudinal data.

PSYCH 7429 Psychometric Theory: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 7421, PSYCH 7422 and consent of instructor A consideration of classical and modern theories of psychological testing. Topics include test reliability, validity and construction.

PSYCH 7430 Introduction To Clinical Skills: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: Admission to doctoral program in clinical psychology. An introduction to processes and procedures involved in psychotherapy.

PSYCH 7431 Clinical Supervision: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Admission to Clinical Psychology Program. Supervised experience in clinical practice. May be repeated six times for credit.

PSYCH 7432 Ethics And Professional Issues: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admission to Clinical Psychology program. A study of issues in professional development, clinical supervision, risk management, and ethical standards as they relate to teaching, research, and professional practice.

PSYCH 7433 Clerkship in Clinical Psychology: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: Admission to the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology. Supervised training in an affiliated agency or organization following completion of two years of course work. (May be repeated 3 times).

PSYCH 7434 Introduction to Clinical Interventions: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admittance to Clinical Psychology program and PSYCH 7406. This course focuses on conceptual and methodological issues that are central to the development, evaluation and application of interventions in clinical psychology. Topics include efficacy and effectiveness research, introduction to theories of behavior change, and applications with specific populations.

PSYCH 7439 Summer Supervision: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: PSYCH 7431 Supervised experience in clinical practice at all graduate year levels during the summer months. Can be repeated for credit.

PSYCH 7442 Seminar: Cognitive And Behavioral Interventions: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 7434 This course focuses on the theory and practice of cognitive-behavioral interventions in the field of clinical psychology.

PSYCH 7447 Trauma And Recovery: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Trauma Studies Certificate A comprehensive seminar on the psychological effects associated with exposure to potentially traumatic events. The course will include information on the history of trauma studies; definitions of stressful and traumatic events; common responses to these events; theoretical models for conceptualizing traumatic responses; information on specific types of traumatic events; and issues in treatment.

PSYCH 7449 Research Methods and Project Development In Applied Psychology: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Program in Psychology or consent of instructor. This course focuses on the basics of conducting research in Industrial-Organizational Psychology. Topics include: philosophy of science; reliability and validity; experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental designs; power; meta-analysis; survey/item analyses; and cross-cultural methods. In addition, the course includes group supervision of initial research that leads to thesis or dissertation proposals. Can be taken up to three times for a total of 6 credit hours.

PSYCH 7450 Clinical Internship I: 1-9 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of advisor. Formal, one year, full-time internship providing student with in-depth supervised training within a site approved by the American Psychological Association. This course is repeated in the fall and spring semesters of the internship year.

PSYCH 7451 Clinical Internship II: 1-9 semester hours

Prerequisite: PSYCH 7450 and consent of advisor. Formal, one-year, full-time internship providing student with in-depth supervised training within a site approved by the American Psychological Association. (Taken in the final summer of the internship).

PSYCH 7454 Seminar: Personnel Psychology: 3 semester hours

An analysis of theories and research in personnel and industrial psychology. Topics include testing, assessment centers, performance appraisal, and interviewing.

PSYCH 7455 Seminar: Organizational Psychology: 3 semester hours

An analysis of theories and research in organizational psychology. Topics include theories of motivation, leadership, job design, group process decision-making, organizational effectiveness, and the relation between organizations and their environment.

PSYCH 7457 Seminar: Special Topics In Industrial Psychology: 3 semester hours

A seminar of selected issues and methods in personnel psychology.

PSYCH 7458 Seminar: Special Topics In Organizational Psychology: 3 semester hours

A seminar of selected issues and methods in organizational psychology.

PSYCH 7459 Practicum In Industrial/Organizational Psychology: 1-4 semester hours

Supervised experience in personnel or human resource management.

PSYCH 7461 Summer Research in I/O Psychology: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: Admission to I/O program. Supervised experience on research topics in I/O psychology at all graduate year levels during the summer months. Can be repeated for credit.

PSYCH 7464 Field Experiences in Industrial-Organizational Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 7454 and PSYCH 7455 or consent of instructor. The course focuses on the innovative application of psychological theory and principles to solving some pressing human resources issues, including actual organizational projects. Through readings, discussions and projects, students obtain hands-on experience with applied psychological issues, striking the needed balance between the theoretical and applied components of Industrial-Organizational psychology.

PSYCH 7465 Applied Issues In Organizational Psychology: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 7455 or consent of instructor course focuses on the application of psychological theory and principles to organizational development consulting. While such consulting is ultimately intended to enhance organizational level functioning, applications of this approach begin with learning at the individual and small group levels. In this course, students work through real-world cases that address real organizational problems. In addition to this casework, the readings and class discussions will address the theoretical and practical links between individual/team learning and organizational development.

PSYCH 7466 Seminar Series in Industrial/Organizational Psychology: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: Open only to students in the I/O Psychology Graduate Program. A seminar series involving speakers, presentations, and discussions focusing on applied and theoretical perspectives, techniques, and research in the field of Industrial/Organizational Psychology. May be taken up to 6 times for credit.

PSYCH 7469 I/O Professional Issues And Ethics: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor In this course students learn the ethical standards as they relate to teaching, research and professional practice in industrial organizational psychology. Other professional and career issues are also discussed.

PSYCH 7472 Special Topics In Psychology: 1-3 semester hours

PSYCH 7474 Clinical Research In Applied Settings: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: PSYCH 7421 and PSYCH 7422 This course provides information on the design and implementation of research in applied settings (e.g., human service agencies). Topics include program evaluation, consultation models, risk factor analysis, presentation and health promotion, and quality control.

PSYCH 7476 Seminar In Developmental Psychopathology: 2 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admission to the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology or consent of instructor. Introduction to principles, theory, and methods of study in the field of clinical child psychology. Emotional and behavioral dysfunctions are considered from developmental and socialization perspectives.

PSYCH 7477 Clinical Intervention with Children and Families: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: PSYCH 7434 and PSYCH 7476. This course provides an overview of the theory and practice of clinical interventions with children, adolescents, and families.

PSYCH 7478 Directed Research In Industrial/Organizational Psychology: 1-4 semester hours

Independent study of an issue in industrial/organizational psychology through the application of research techniques.

PSYCH 7479 Directed Readings In Industrial/Organizational Psychology: 1-4 semester hours

Independent literature review of a topic in industrial/organizational psychology.

PSYCH 7483 Directed Research: 1-10 semester hours

PSYCH 7484 Directed Readings: 1-10 semester hours

PSYCH 7485 Research Team I: 2 semester hours

Group supervision of beginning research leading to the Independent Research Project.

PSYCH 7486 Research Team II: 2 semester hours

Prerequisites: Completion of Independent Research Project or third year standing in doctoral program in clinical psychology. Group supervision of advanced research related to dissertation proposal and program's comprehensive examination required for doctoral candidacy.

PSYCH 7487 Thesis Research Project: 1 semester hour

Prerequisites: Admission to the doctoral program in clinical psychology. Supervised original research project of a clinically-related topic.

PSYCH 7488 Specialty Examination Research: 1-6 semester hours

Prerequisites: Admission to the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology. Supervised original review and analysis of a clinicallyrelated topic.

PSYCH 7491 MA Thesis Research: 1-10 semester hours

PSYCH 7492 Ph D Thesis Research: 1-10 semester hours

Michael G. Griffin
Associate Professor and Chairperson
Ph.D., University of Missouri-St. Louis

Therese H. Macan
Professor
Ph.D., Rice University

Robert H. Paul
Professor and Director of Missouri Institute of Mental Health
Ph.D. , University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

George T. Taylor
Professor and Director of Doctoral Program in Behavioral Neuroscience
Ph.D., University of New Mexico

Brian R. Vandenberg
Professor and Director of Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology
Ph.D. , University of Rochester

James A. Breaugh
Professor
Ph.D. , Ohio State University
Primary appointment in the College of Business Administration

Steven E. Bruce
Associate Professors and Co-Director Center for Trauma Recovery
Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University

Tara E. Galovski
Associate Professors
Ph.D., State University of New York in Albany

Ann M. Steffen
Associate Professors
Ph.D., Indiana University

Stephanie M. Merritt
Associate Professors and Director of Industrial/ Organization Psychology Graduate Programs
Ph.D., Michigan State University

Zoe D. Peterson
Associate Professors
Ph.D., University of Kansas

Matthew J. Taylor
Associate Professors
Ph.D., University of Missouri-St. Louis

Mark E. Tubbs
Associate Professors
Ph.D. , University of Houston

Kamila S. White
Associate Professors
Ph.D. , Virginia Commonwealth University

Carl Bassi
Associate Professors
Ph.D. , Vanderbilt University
Primary appointment in the College of Optometry

Thomas Meuser
Associate Professors
Ph.D. , University of Missouri-St. Louis
Primary appointment in the School of Social Work; Director of Gerontology

Gualtiero Piccinini
Associate Professors
Ph.D. , University of Pittsburgh
Primary appointment in the Department of Philosophy

Bettina J. Casad
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., Claremont Graduate University

Emily Gerstein
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., Arizona State University

Sandra Langeslag
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., Erasmus University Rotterdam

John P. Meriac
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. , University of Tennessee-Knoxville

Suzanne Welcome
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. , University of California at Riverside

Dyan W. Harper
Teaching Professor
Ph.D. , Northern Illinois University

Jennifer Siciliani
Teaching Professor
Ph.D. , University of Tennessee-Knoxville

Jerry H. Dunn
Associate Clinical Professor and Director of Children's Advocacy Center
Ph.D. , University of Missouri-St. Louis
Primary appointment in Children's Advocacy Center

Matthew Kliethermes
Associate Clinical Professor
Ph.D. , St. Louis University
Primary appointment in Children's Advocacy Center

Deana Smith
Associate Clinical Professor and Associate Director of Community Psychological Service
Ph.D., University of Missouri-St. Louis

Steven Bourne
Assistant Clinical Professor and Associate Director (Clinical Services) of Community Psychological Service
Ph.D., University of Sheffield

John Nanney
Assistant Clinical Professor and Director, Community Psychological Services
Ph.D., University of Missouri-St. Louis

Chaya Gopalan
Associate Professor of Physiology and St. Louis College of Pharmacy
Ph.D. , Michigan State University

David F. Wozniak
Research Professor and Washington University Medical School
Ph.D. , Washington University

Lee Konczak
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Ph.D. , University of Missouri-St. Louis

Sandra K. Seigel
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Ph.D. , Saint Louis University

Gary A. Morse
Adjunct Professor
Ph.D. , University of Missouri-St. Louis

David E. Smith
Adjunct Associate Professor
Ph.D. , Colorado State University

Miles L. Patterson
Founders Professor
Ph.D., Northwestern University

Gary K. Burger
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D. , Loyola University

Edmund S. Howe
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D. , University of London

Samuel J. Marwit
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D. , State University of New York, Buffalo

Dominic J. Zerbolio, Jr.
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D. , Michigan State University

Jayne E. Stake
Professor Emerita
Ph.D. , Arizona State University

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