History

Campus Address: 484 Lucas Hall
Web Site: http://www.umsl.edu/~umslhistory/
Main Number: 314-516-5681
Fax Number: 314-516-5781

General Information

Degrees and Areas of Concentration

The department offers work in Asian, African, African American, European, Latin American, Mexican, World, and United States history from ancient to modern times. At the bachelor's level, the department offers the B.A. in history, and, in cooperation with the College of Education, the B.A. in history with teacher certification and the B.S. in education with an emphasis in social studies.

At the graduate level, the department offers an M.A. in history with work in U.S and World history. The department also offers the option of an M.A. in history with a concentration in Museum Studies and Community History along with a certificate in History Education and a certificate in Public History and Cultural Heritage.

Undergraduate Studies

General Education Requirements

History majors must meet the university and college general education requirements. History courses that will satisfy the university's state requirement are:

HIST 1001American Civilization To 18653
HIST 1002American Civilization 1865 To Present3
HIST 1003African-American History3
HIST 1004The History Of Women In The United States3
HIST 2001Creating Early America: European Empires, Colonial Cultures, and Native Nations, 1565-17763
HIST 2003United States History: From Nation to Civil War3
HIST 2004United States History: The Civil War Era, 1860-19003
HIST 2005The Modernization Of The United States3
HIST 2006Recent United States History3
HIST 2007History Of Missouri3
HIST 2010From Sea to Shining Sea: The American Frontier 1763 - 18903
HIST 2020History of Women and Social Movements3
HIST 2023US Foreign Relations and Military History To 19003
HIST 2024US Foreign Relations and Military History Since 19003
HIST 2800History Of American Economic Development3

Students may take any language that fulfills the college's foreign language requirement.

Majors may not take required history courses on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Students enrolled in variable credit reading courses for 5 credit hours must complete a seminar paper.

Degree Requirements

Bachelor of Arts in History

Students are encouraged to move from introductory courses at the 1000 to more advanced content-oriented courses at the 2000 level then to skill oriented courses at the 3000 and 4000 levels.

1000 Level
Select one of the following in U.S. History:3
American Civilization To 1865
American Civilization 1865 To Present
African-American History
The History Of Women In The United States
Select one of the following in European History:3
The Ancient Empires of the Mediterranean
Topics European Civilization: Emergence Of Western Europe To 1715
Topics In European Civilization: 1715 To The Present
Select one of the following in African, Asian, Latin American, or World History:3
East Asian Civilization
East Asian Civilization
Latin American Civilization
Mexican Civilization
African Civilization: From The Beginning of Humanity to The End of The Slave Trade
African Civilization II: From Colonies to Nations
World History to 1500
World History Since 1500
Select two additional courses at the 1000 level on any subject including INTDSC 1999.6
2000 and 3000 Level 1
Select between one and three courses at the 2000 and 3000 level. 23-9
HIST 2999Introduction to Historical Inquiry4
4000 Level 3
Select between two and four sections of the following:6-12
Inquiries in U.S. History
Inquiries in World History
HIST 4999Senior Seminar 45
Total Hours33-45

1

2000 and 3000 level courses offer in-depth historical content.

2

At least one of the courses at this level must be in the fields of African, Asian, or Latin American History

3

4000 level courses are designed primarily for majors and focus on developing historical writing and thinking skills.

4

In this course, history majors demonstrate mastery over historical thinking, writing, and research skills.  This course should be taken once students have completed all other requirements for the major.

Majors must complete at least 39, but not more than 45, hours in history with no grade below C. Courses SEC ED 4011 and SEC ED 4012 do not count toward the major. After fulfilling the general education and specific major degree requirements, students take the remaining 30 hours required to complete the B.A. or B.S. degrees from courses, from one or more of the following or their-quality equivalents at other institutions, if the appropriate department has evaluated them as being of university-level quality: anthropology/archaeology, art (appreciation, history, studio), biology, chemistry, communication, criminology and criminal justice, economics, English, foreign languages/literatures, history , mathematics/computer science, music (appreciation, history, performance), philosophy, physics and astronomy/geology, political science, psychology, social work, sociology, business, education, engineering, and interdisciplinary.

Undergraduate majors must complete a residency minimum of 15 hours of 2000/3000/4000 level History courses including HIST 4999 (5 credit hours) at UMSL.

Departmental Honors

Students majoring in history may be awarded departmental honors upon graduation if they have achieved the following: a) at least a 3.2 overall GPA; b) at least a 3.5 GPA for all hours attempted in history courses; and c) an outstanding research paper in the Senior Seminar as certified by the faculty member responsible for directing it.

Learning Outcomes.

The following learning outcomes are anticipated in the successful completion of a Bachelor of Arts in History

  • Communication: Write clearly and coherently and listen to oral presentations, summarize the arguments made and discuss them in the context of other oral presentations or conversations.
  • Valuing/Ethics/Integrity: Understand and articulate the diversity of identities and political and social systems that have shaped human behavior over time. Understand and articulate one's own identity in terms of race, gender and class, and to locate that identity in the wider world, both past and present.
  • Critical Thinking: Listen to oral presentations, summarize the arguments made and discuss them in the context of other oral presentations or conversations. Accurately summarize an argument and discuss it in the context of other arguments.
  • Content Knowledge: Embedded in Other Outcomes

Minor in History

Students may minor in history by taking 19 hours of history courses as follows:

  1. One course numbered 1001-1099 in each of the following areas: United States history, European history, and either Asian, African, Latin American or World history (9 credits)
  2. Three courses numbered 2000-3999, including History 2999 (10 credits)

No course in which a grade below a C is received shall count toward a minor.

The Minor in History of Science and Technology

The Minor in History of Science and Technology (HST) is an interdisciplinary program requiring a minimum of 18 credits in HST.

All required courses must be completed with a "C" or higher. The satisfactory/unsatisfactory option may not be used. No transfer courses may be used towards the HST Minor. A minimum of 12 hours must be taken at 2000 and above with 9 of those hours being at 3000 or above. Courses in the upper division may satisfy requirements for the student’s major, consistently with the major’s requirements.

Requirements

Logic or Methodology
Select one of the following in either logic or methodology:3
Practicum In Cultural Research Methods
Laboratory Methods In Archaeology
Introduction to Historical Inquiry
Formal Logic
Advanced Formal Logic
Research Methods
Research Methods
History
Select two of the following in history of science and technology:6
History Of Economic Thought
Religion, Philosophy & Science in History: Introduction to The Intellectual History Of The West
Introduction To Transportation
History Of Aviation In American Life
Urbanization And Transportation
Inquiries in World History
Topics In History And Philosophy Of Science
Conceptual and Historical Foundations of Psychology
Science
Select 9 credit hours in the mathematical, physical, life, behavioral, or social sciences 29
Total Hours18

1

Note: HIST 4143 is offered under different topics; only the specific topic listed here counts as HPST.

2

The science courses must be in addition to those satisfying the Gen Ed requirements and conditional upon their acceptance by the HST undergraduate advisor.

Prerequisites:

Some courses required by the Minor in History have prerequisites. (It should be particularly noted that all 3000 level History courses require HIST 2999.) Some students may satisfy prerequisites by virtue of their prior curriculum. When this is not the case, students are responsible for either satisfying the prerequisites by adding courses to their curriculum or obtaining a waiver from the instructor.

Alternative courses to satisfy the History requirements:

Some courses may satisfy the History requirement even though they are not listed as such, depending on what their content is. These include variable content courses, courses at the Honors College, and history of philosophy courses. If a course that deals with some aspect of History and should satisfy a requirement is not listed among those satisfying the requirements, you may do the following:

  1. Obtain the description of what the course will cover.
  2. Write a very short explanation of why the course ought to count toward satisfaction of the requirement, by showing how it deals with the relevant aspect of History.
  3. Submit both to the History undergraduate advisor for approval.

Bachelor of Liberal Studies Option:

A minor in history may be combined with a minor in the Philosophy of Science and Technology and a capstone to form a Bachelor of Liberal Studies. The relevant capstones are either HIST 4999 or PHIL 4491. Since students taking HIST 4999 must have taken HIST 2999, it is suggest such students use to satisfy the Logic and Methodology requirement. Students can use the same course to satisfy the Logic and Methodology requirement of both minors, but cannot use the same science courses. Also, a Bachelor of Liberal Studies program is easily combined, in turn, with a major in any science as a double major. This provides the student with a deeper historical and conceptual understanding of the science(s) he or she is studying.

Related Areas

Since history is a broad discipline, it can be combined with serious work in any other discipline. Courses in the humanities, social sciences, languages, and the natural sciences may complement the history program. Students should consult with faculty advisers to select courses suited to their individual interests.

Bachelor of Arts in History with Teacher Certification

Students majoring in History may earn Social Studies Teacher Certification as follows:

Social Studies

Teacher certification students must complete the major and meet these minimum social science requirements:

American History, including:12
United States History For The Secondary Classroom
European or World History, including:9
World History For The Secondary Classroom
United States and/or State Government, including:6
American Government For The Secondary Classroom
Behavioral Science6
Economics3
Geography3
Social Studies Elective2
Total Hours41

Social science methods course is  SEC ED 4011.

For emphasis area advising, you must see a History/Social Studies advisor. You must also see an advisor in the College of Education regarding Education requirements.

For more information, refer to the Secondary Education in this Bulletin.

Bachelor of Science in Education: Emphasis in Social Studies

The history requirements are the same as for the B.A. degree except students fulfill the College of Education general education requirements rather than those of the College of Arts and Sciences. For information, refer to the College of Education section in this Bulletin.

Graduate Studies

The department offers the MA in History, the MA in History with a Museum Studies concentration and three Graduate Concentrations: Museum Studies, Public History and Cultural Heritage, and History Education. Qualified students may enter the MA through two different routes, either as graduates with a baccalaureate degree or as exceptional undergraduates via the 2 + 3 program.

The M.A. Degree

The Department of History offers two the Master of Arts in History and the Master of Arts in History with Concentration in Museum Studies. These options are described below.

Master of Arts in History

The Department of History offers students two ways of completing the Master of Arts degree: one path of study emphasizes depth of knowledge and research competence acquired through writing a substantial master's thesis; the second emphasizes breadth of historical knowledge acquired through graduate course work and the writing of research papers. Both paths include a core of substantive courses in history (see Core) to which the student adds either a thesis (see Thesis) or additional research papers and seminars (see Research Papers).

The M.A. program offers all students intermediate training preparatory to doctoral programs, advanced training leading to teaching and other careers, and disciplined advanced work.

The History M.A. program offers study in U.S. History, World History, History Education, Public History and Cultural Heritage, and Museum Studies. Students should consult with the Director of Graduate Studies to be sure that they have properly selected their fields of study.

Admission Requirements

Applicants must meet several departmental admission requirements in addition to the general criteria of the Graduate School. The applicant's undergraduate studies need not have been in history, but they must demonstrate high academic potential.Normally, only students with a 3.2 grade point average (3.35 for the online degree) in their undergraduate major are admitted; most successful applicants have higher grades.

Applicants must submit three letters of recommendation, preferably from former teachers, and a sample of their written work. The History Department bases its admission decisions upon the undergraduate transcript, the letters of recommendation, and the sample of written work. The deadlines for applications are March 15th for the Fall semester and October 15th for the Spring semester. Applications will be accepted after these deadlines but admission for the upcoming semester is not guaranteed.

Core

All candidates for the M.A. degree in history must complete a core of 26 hours of course work (excluding thesis credit), with no more than nine hours of history and related fields at the 5000 level. This 26-hour core must include seven courses at 3 credit hours each (21 hours in all), and one 5-credit-hour writing seminar consisting of a 2-credit-hour research paper supplement to a 3-credit-hour, 6000-level history readings course.

To earn the 26-hour core, candidates must complete HIST 6000 and select at least one field of study with a minimum of three courses (each at 3 credit hours or more.) Students may use the remaining hours to complete a second field.

In addition to this core, each candidate must select one of the two following degree options:

  1. Thesis Option--32 hours total

    In addition to the core, the candidate choosing this option must enroll for 6 hours of thesis credit and submit an acceptable thesis. The thesis is based on original research in primary sources. Normally, theses do not exceed 100 pages of text. Candidates receive a grade for the thesis upon its approval by an advisory committee. The committee consists of professors selected by the candidate after consultation with the major professor. One member of the committee must be from the department but outside the candidate's general area of study, and one may be outside the history department.

    The advisory committee conducts an oral examination on the thesis during the candidate's last semester of residence.

    The committee decides whether the candidate shall pass, fail, or fail with the option to repeat the oral examination at a later date. Students may not take the oral examination more than twice. The second examination must be held no less than one and no more than two semesters following the date of the first examination. Summer session may be counted as a semester under this procedure, but students should be aware of the difficulties involved in assembling faculty committees during the summer.

    Thesis candidates must demonstrate competence in one foreign language or in quantitative methods as applied to historical study. Candidates shall demonstrate foreign language competence by translating, with the use of a dictionary, 500 words in one hour. Normally a member of the history faculty will conduct this examination and choose the test for translation. Candidates shall demonstrate quantitative methods competence by satisfactory completion of either PSYCH 2201 Psychological Statistics or SOC 3220 Sociological Statistics, or their equivalent.
     
  2. Research Paper Option-36 hours total

    To complete this option, the candidate must complete two 5-credit-hour seminars (each consisting of a 6000-level reading seminar plus 2 credit hours of supplementary work on a substantial research paper), in addition to the core. The candidate may choose a fourth field in addition to the three already represented in the core to complete this option.

The 2+3 B.A. and M.A. in History

The 2+3 B.A./B.S. – Ed and M.A. in History enables students of demonstrated academic ability and educational maturity to complete the requirements for both degrees in five years of full-time study. Because of its accelerated nature, the program requires the completion of lower-division requirements (15 hours) before entry into the three-year portion of the program. It also has prerequisites numbered 5000-5999 for graduate readings courses numbered 6000-6999. When all the requirements of the B.A/B.S. – Ed. and M.A. program have been completed, students will be awarded both the baccalaureate and master’s degrees. A carefully designed program can permit a student to earn both degrees within as few as ten semesters.

The combined program requires a minimum of 137 hours, at least 5 of which must be at the senior level (HIST 4999) and at least 32 of which must be at the graduate level (courses numbered in the 5000 and 6000 range). In qualifying for the B.A. or B.S. – Ed., students must meet all university and college requirements, including the requirements of the undergraduate major. In qualifying for the M.A., students must meet all university and Graduate School requirements, including satisfactory completion of at least 32 credit hours at the graduate level.

The semester they will complete 62 undergraduate credit hours, (including 15 credit hours of appropriate 1000-level coursework in the History Department and ART ED 5588) interested students should apply to the Graduate Director of the Department of History for admission to the 2+3 combined degree program in History. A cumulative grade point average of 3.4 or higher in history courses, a writing sample, and three letters of recommendation from faculty are required for consideration. Students will be admitted to the 2+3 program under provisional status until they have completed 105 total credit hours toward their BA degree with a grade point average of 3.0 or higher. After completion of the provisional period, and with the recommendation of the graduate director, and approval of the graduate dean, students can be granted full admission into the program. Students will not be admitted to the program, if they have accumulated more than 105 credits. Students in the 2+3 program begin to pay graduate credit hour fees once they exceed the 105 credit hour threshold. Students must maintain a grade point average of 3.0 or higher throughout the combined program. Students who officially withdraw from the 2+3 combined degree program will be awarded the B.A. or B.S. – Ed. Degree when they have successfully completed all the requirements for the degree.

Undergraduate History Requirements For Students in the 2+3 Program

The following requirements must be completed prior to enrolling in the 2+3 Program:

1000 Level
Select one of the following in U.S. History:3
American Civilization To 1865
American Civilization 1865 To Present
African-American History
The History Of Women In The United States
Select one of the following in European History:3
The Ancient Empires of the Mediterranean
Topics European Civilization: Emergence Of Western Europe To 1715
Topics In European Civilization: 1715 To The Present
Select one of the following in African, Asian, Latin American, or World History:3
East Asian Civilization
East Asian Civilization
Latin American Civilization
Mexican Civilization
African Civilization: From The Beginning of Humanity to The End of The Slave Trade
African Civilization II: From Colonies to Nations
Arts And Ideas
History of American Leadership
Select two additional courses at the 1000 level on any subject.6
2000 Level
HIST 2999Introduction to Historical Inquiry (must receive a grade of C or higher )4
Total Hours19

Once admitted to the program students must take the following courses:

Additional Undergraduate History Requirements For Students in the 2+3 Program

HIST 4999, Senior Seminar (5)
NOTE: B.S.-Ed. students must also take SEC ED 4012, SEC ED 4013 and HIST 4014.

Graduate History Requirements For Students in the 2+3 Program

  • Three courses at the 5000-level for 9 credit hours.
  • Five courses at the 6000-level for 17 credits beginning with HIST 6000 (students must take two of their three 5000-level courses prior to enrolling in HIST 6000), followed by at least three courses in a major field of study and one 5-credit course.
  • In addition to this core, each candidate must select one of the two following degree options:
    1. Thesis Option –32 hours total

      In addition to the fulfilling the requirements listed above, the candidate choosing this option must enroll for 6 hours of thesis credit and submit an acceptable thesis. The thesis is based on original research in primary sources. Normally, theses do not exceed 100 pages of text. Candidates receive a grade for the thesis upon its approval by an advisory committee. The committee consists of professors selected by the candidate after consultation with the major professor. One member of the committee must be from the department but outside the candidate’s general area of study, and one may be outside the history department.

      The advisory committee conducts an oral examination on the thesis during the candidate’s last semester of residence.

      The committee decides whether the candidate shall pass, fail or fail with the option to repeat the oral examination at a later date. Students may not take the oral examination more than twice. The second examination must be held no less than one and no more than two semesters following the date of the first examination. Summer session may be counted as a semester under this procedure, but students should be aware of the difficulties involved in assembling faculty committees during the summer.

      Thesis candidates must demonstrate competence in one foreign language or in quantitative methods as applied to historical study. Candidates shall demonstrate foreign language competence by translating, with the use of a dictionary, 500 words in one hour. A member of the history faculty will conduct this examination and choose the test for translation. Candidates shall demonstrate quantitative methods competence by satisfactory completion of either PSYCH 2201, Psychological Statistics or SOC 3220, Sociological Statistics, or their equivalent.
       
    2. Research Paper Option

      To complete this option, the candidate must complete two additional 5-credit hour seminars (each consisting of a 6000-level reading seminar plus 2 credit hours of supplementary work on a substantial research paper.) The candidate may choose a fourth field in addition to the three already represented in the core to complete this option. 

Concentration in Museum Studies


The MA in History with a concentration in Museum Studies prepares students for professional careers in museums, historic sites and societies, cultural agencies, and related organizations. The degree addresses pressing needs of museums and heritage institutions for the 21st century: collaboration and community engagement, digital media and new technologies, and diversity and cross-cultural training. The curriculum includes courses on the sociocultural, historical, and intellectual foundations of museums; the theory and practice of public history and cultural heritage; professional development and practicums for multiple museum career paths; qualitative and quantitative research methods; digital media; non-profit resource development; community-based research and history; the comparative and cross-cultural study of material culture; and a strong grounding in the methods, professional
protocols, and modes of analysis in History.

The Departments of History; Anthropology, Sociology and Languages; Art and Art History; the Missouri History Museum; the St. Louis Mercantile Library; and other historic sites and museums collaborate to sustain this innovative program, taught by professors and practicing professionals from St. Louis-area museums, historic sites, and cultural institutions. The degree trains students to advance the new paradigm of museum work and public history that focuses on inclusivity and the relationships between institutions and the communities that they serve. Upon completion of the program, students are prepared for immediate entry into museum careers in a variety of positions.

Admission Requirements 

Prospective students for the Master of Arts in History with a concentration in Museum Studies must apply specifically for this program on the graduate application. Successful application for the M.A. in History does not automatically provide access to the Museum Studies program. Applications for the Master of Arts in History with a concentration in Museum Studies will be accepted only for the fall semester.

Prospective students must demonstrate high academic potential. Typically, the History department admits only students with at least a 3.2 grade point average in their undergraduate major; most successful applicants have higher grades. An undergraduate major in History is not required.  Applicants must submit three letters of recommendation, preferably from former teachers and/or employers, and a sample of their written work. Applicants must also complete the Museum Studies Supplemental Application, which includes a statement of career intent.

Admissions decisions are based on the undergraduate transcript, the letters of recommendation, the sample of written work, and the supplemental application.

Applications must be received by the university no later than January 15.

Program Requirements (39 hours)

All candidates for the M.A. in History with a Concentration in Museum Studies must complete the following coursework:

HIST 6001The Historian's Craft1-3
HIST 6131Museum Origins and Evolution3
Plus two of the following courses:
Practicum In Exhibit & Program Development
Museum Education and Visitor Research
Collections Management and Registration
Digital Video for Museums and Community History
Museums and History in the Digital Age
History Curatorship
Museum Organization and Operations
 

Students must also complete an additional 20-22 elective credits as approved by the Director of Museum Studies, of which at least 12 credits must be History courses.   Students may choose electives from the preceding list, the History department curriculum, and a range of offerings in Anthropology, Sociology, and Languages; Art and Art History; Media Studies; and Nonprofit Management and Leadership. Courses address such topics as: community-based research, public archaeology, cultural resource management, quantitative and qualitative research methods, the history of visual arts in American museums, arts and visual resources management, material culture in the home, media law and ethics, documentary filmmaking, grant-writing, American philanthropy, and area and period studies. A maximum of six credits may be at the 3000 level.

Candidates conclude the degree with an exit project or thesis represented by the course numbered HIST 6138, ANTHRO 6138 or ART HS 6038 (5 credits.) This capstone project will demonstrate competence in museum studies. The specific form will be customized to the interests and career aspirations of each student, as approved in advance by the candidate’s advisory committee.

In addition to these requirements, candidates for the MA in History with a concentration in Museum Studies are required to demonstrate either oral or written proficiency in one second language (in addition to English). Proficiency at a level that enables the candidate to conduct research must be demonstrated by passing either an oral or written test, whichever is most appropriate for the candidate’s research methodology, in a language that is relevant to the candidate’s chosen specialization.  The test will be designed through consultation with the candidate and the faculty of the Languages Program.

Graduate Certificate in Museum Studies

The Graduate Certificate in Museum Studies provides interdisciplinary professional and academic training for museum professionals and others who seek to develop their practical skills and knowledge about museums. The program couples a strong intellectual foundation in the sociocultural, historical, and intellectual practices of museums with professional training for museum administration, curatorship, visitor research, digital media, and development. The Certificate is crafted to allow students to pursue course work that speaks to their particular career aspirations, drawing on classes from History; Anthropology, Sociology, and Languages; Art and Art History; Education; and Nonprofit Management and Leadership, as well as classes taught by museum professionals from the St. Louis area. 

Applications for the Graduate Certificate in Museum Studies are accepted for the fall semester only. Prospective students wishing to pursue the Graduate Certificate in Museum Studies in conjunction with an MA degree should follow the normal application procedures for their respective Master’s level program. Applicants wishing to pursue the Graduate Certificate in Museum Studies alone normally must have a GPA of 3.2 or higher. They should apply specifically for this certificate program, submit three letters of recommendation and a writing sample, and complete the Museum Studies supplemental application with
their application for graduate work.

Admissions decisions are based on the undergraduate transcript, the letters of recommendation, the sample of written work, and the supplemental application.

Applications must be received by the university no later than January 15.

Program Requirements (18 hours)

All candidates for Graduate Certificate in Museum Studies must complete HIST 6131 Museum Origins and Evolutions (3). They must also take at least two courses from the following list:

ANTHRO 6139Practicum In Exhibit & Program Development3
ART ED 5588Museum Education and Visitor Research3
HIST 6130Collections Management and Registration3
HIST 6132Digital Video for Museums and Community History 3
HIST 6133Museums and History in the Digital Age3
HIST 6134History Curatorship5
HIST 6137Museum Organization and Operations3


Students must also complete an additional 7-9 credits as approved by the Director of Museum Studies. In addition to the courses listed above, offerings include classes in Anthropology, Sociology, and Languages; Art and Art History; Media Studies; and Nonprofit Management and Leadership. Courses address such topics as: community-based research, public archaeology, cultural resource management, quantitative and qualitative research methods, the history of visual arts in American museums, arts and visual resources management, material culture in the home, media law and ethics, documentary filmmaking, grant-writing, American philanthropy, and area and period studies.

Graduate Certificate in Public History and Cultural Heritage

The Graduate Certificate in Public History and Cultural Heritage at the University of Missouri-St. Louis is an 18-credit program that provides interdisciplinary training for students pursuing careers that engage communities with the past. The theoretical knowledge and practical experience gained through coursework and internships will prepare graduates for a wide variety of jobs in museums, historical societies, cultural resource agencies, historic preservation, community development, and tourism, particularly those located in the St. Louis region.
 

Admission Requirements

Applicants wishing to pursue the Graduate Certificate in Public History and Cultural Heritage in conjunction with an MA degree should follow the normal application procedures for their respective Master’s level program. Applicants wishing to pursue the Graduate Certificate in Public History and Cultural Heritage alone normally must have a GPA of 3.2 or higher and should apply specifically for this certificate program and submit three letters of recommendation and a writing sample along with their application.

Program Requirements

All candidates for Graduate Certificate in Public History and Cultural Heritage must complete the following courses:
 

HIST 6101Readings In American History To 18653-5
HIST 6124Graduate Internship3
HIST 6125Practicum in Public History and Cultural Heritage3
In addition, students must take an additional nine credits at the graduate level in courses approved by the Program Director. Courses available to fulfill this additional nine-credit requirement include:
Archaeological Field School
Laboratory Methods In Archaeology
Cultural Resource Management And Historic Preservation
ED TECH 6454Instructional Video Production3
POL SCI 6470Proseminar In Urban Politics3
Please see the Program Director for additional courses that may be available
Total Hours15-17

Graduate Certificate in History Education

The Graduate Certificate in History Education is designed for practicing teachers, instructional coordinators, and history educators in the community who are seeking to deepen their knowledge of history education. It will offer history and social studies educators a program that integrates historical and educational knowledge, theory, and practice. The purpose of the certificate is to improve the practice of history education in schools and the community, to introduce history educators to metahistorical theory and practice, to deepen their historical knowledge, and to encourage sophisticated teaching and curriculum development built on research at the intersection of history and the learning sciences.

Admission Requirements

Applicants wishing to pursue the Graduate Certificate in History Education in conjunction with an MA degree or an MED should follow the normal application procedures for their respective Master’s level program. Applicants wishing to pursue the Graduate Certificate in History Education alone normally must have a GPA of 3.2 or higher and should apply specifically for this certificate program and submit three letters of recommendation and a writing sample along with their application.

Program Requirements

All candidates for Graduate Certificate in History Education must complete:

HIST 6113Readings in East Asian History 1
HIST/TCH ED 6115Readings In African History3
HIST 6116Historical Thinking in Theory and Practice II3
1

This course will not be offered in 2014-2015. Please contact the department for more information.

Students must take an additional nine credits at the graduate level in History or Education courses as approved by the Program Director.

Career Outlook for B. A. and M. A. graduates

An important rationale for the discipline of history is its centrality to the university curriculum and to the life experience. The ability to put events or developments into the context of the past is useful as well as pleasurable. Responses to a questionnaire sent to history graduates have indicated that alumni in a wide variety of fields are as conscious of and appreciative of their training in history as those who have chosen it as a profession. Men and women in business, lawyers, bankers, librarians, and foreign service officers have all found it relevant to their careers. Study and research in history sharpens organizational and writing skills important to success in business and the legal profession. A growing interest in local history has created employment opportunities in museum, archival, and preservation work.

Career Outlook for M. A. with Concentration in Museum Studies

There are more than 8,000 museums in the United States. History museums constitute more than half of that total and employ approximately one-third of the 150,000 paid staff working in U. S. museums. While job requirements vary widely among individual museums and specific professional roles, the M.A. degree offered by this program qualifies graduates for a wide range of career opportunities, in history museums and in other types of museums as well. The Museum Studies Program provides students with placement assistance and counseling and with access to a wide range of information on career opportunities in the field, and program faculty use their extensive networks in the field to help identify opportunities and to place students.

Sample Four Year Plan 

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
INTDSC 100311HIST 1000+ level courses6
HIST 1001, 1002, 1003, or 10043HIST 1041, 1042, 1051, 1061, 1075, or 10763
Foreign Language 10015Foreign Language 10025
General Education3 
HIST 1030, 1031, or 10323 
 15 14
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
HIST 2000-3999 level course3HIST 29994
Foreign Language 21013General Education 6
General Education6Elective or minor6
Elective or minor 3 
 15 16
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
HIST 2000-3999 level course in African, Asian, or Latin American History3HIST 41433
General Education 3HIST 2000-3999 level course3
Elective or minor 6General Education3
ENGL 31003Elective or minor6
 15 15
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
HIST 41423HIST 49995
General Education6General Education3
Elective or minor6Elective or minor7
 15 15
Total Hours: 120
1

INTDSC 1003 is required only for first-time freshmen and transfer students with less than 24 college credits.

PLEASE NOTE: This plan is an example of what a four year plan could look like for a typical student. Placement exam scores in math as well as the completion of coursework may change the plan. It should not be used in the place of regular academic advising appointments. All students are encouraged to meet with their advisor each semester. All requirements are subject to change.

Courses

HIST 1000 Selected Topics In History: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor Special topics in history. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

HIST 1001 American Civilization To 1865: 3 semester hours

Evolution of the cultural tradition of the Americas from the earliest times to the mid-nineteenth century, with emphasis on the relationship of ideas and institutions to the historical background. Course fulfills the state requirement.

HIST 1002 American Civilization 1865 To Present: 3 semester hours

Continuation of HIST 1001 to the present. Course fulfills the state requirement. Either HIST 1001 or HIST 1002 taken separately.

HIST 1003 African-American History: 3 semester hours

A survey of African-American history from the beginning of the European slave trade to the modern Civil Rights era. This course meets the state requirement.

HIST 1004 The History Of Women In The United States: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 1004. A survey of women's history from the colonial era to the present.

HIST 1030 The Ancient Empires of the Mediterranean: 3 semester hours

Survey of ancient history in the near east, the Aegean, the central and western Mediterranean. Themes: politics and economy, war and society, culture, including art, literature, technology, religion and philosophy. The chronological span is from the neolithic period (7500-3000 B.C.) in the near east to the fall of the Roman Empire in the fifth century A.D.

HIST 1031 Topics European Civilization: Emergence Of Western Europe To 1715: 3 semester hours

Lectures and discussions on the development of western European society and tradition from approximately 1000 to 1715.

HIST 1032 Topics In European Civilization: 1715 To The Present: 3 semester hours

Lectures and discussions on the development of western European society and tradition from 1715 to the present.

HIST 1037 The Wonders of Greece: Introduction to Greek History and Culture: 3 semester hours

SAME AS ANTHRO 1037. Our democracy and culture have been heavily influenced by Greek civilization. This course will introduce students to the culture and civilization of Greece in order to provide a better understanding of our own society. The course will cover the political and military history, art, literature, philosophy, and science of Greece from prehistoric to modern times, with special emphasis on Greek civilization's enduring democratic and cultural ideals. The course will include screening of films and use of online resources.

HIST 1038 Byzantine History and Culture: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 1038. This course introduces the history of the Byzantine Empire from the fourth through the fifteen centuries. Covering more than a millennium of history, this course focuses on selected aspects of the empire’s history, while adhering to a basic chronological frame. We will examine religious developments (monasticism, theological controversy, the Catholic-Orthodox Schism); military and cultural interactions with neighbors (Crusaders, Islam); and Byzantine culture, particularly art, literature, and architecture.

HIST 1041 East Asian Civilization: 3 semester hours

The development of Asian civilization from earliest times to the Manchu conquest.

HIST 1042 East Asian Civilization: 3 semester hours

Continuation of HIST 1041 with emphasis on the Asian response to the Western incursion. Either HIST 1041 or HIST 1042 may be taken separately.

HIST 1051 Latin American Civilization: 3 semester hours

A survey of selected topics important in the development of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to the twentieth century.

HIST 1052 Mexican Civilization: 3 semester hours

This course will focus on the history and culture of Mexico from the Aztecs to the mid-twentieth century. Among the topics to be covered are: the Aztecs, Cortez and the Conquest of Mexico, colonial institutions and culture, the obtaining of political independence, disorder and dictatorship in the nineteenth century, the Mexican Revolution, contemporary Mexico. This course meets the non-Euro-American requirement.

HIST 1061 African Civilization: From The Beginning of Humanity to The End of The Slave Trade: 3 semester hours

Introduction to cultural history from the emergence of early humankind to the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade. This course fulfills the Cultural Diversity requirement.

HIST 1062 African Civilization II: From Colonies to Nations: 3 semester hours

Survey of African initiative and response in the period spanning the loss and reassertion of independence. Either HIST 1061 or HIST 1062 may be taken separately.

HIST 1075 World History to 1500: 3 semester hours

A survey of the history of humankind to 1500 including the beginnings of civilization Mesopotamia, Africa, Asia and the Americas, the rise of Classical civilizations and the development of major transnational social, economic, political and religious networks.

HIST 1076 World History Since 1500: 3 semester hours

A survey of the history of humankind since 1500, emphasizing the growing interdependency of regional economic, political, and social systems. Topics will include imperialism, industrialization, and globalization.

HIST 1111 Reacting to the Past: 4 semester hours

Reacting to the Past is a series of historical simulations built around key moments and texts from the past. In each simulation, students are assigned a role and develop that character. The course offers students a rigorous academic experience in which they conduct historical research, speak, and write extensively. Because this course requires extensive writing, it fulfills the requirement for Freshman Composition.

HIST 1776 History of American Leadership: 3 semester hours

An introduction to the study of leaders in America that will cover different categories of political, cultural, social, and intellectual leadership and achievement. Crucial to the understanding of these categories is the question: how did leaders find their gift in becoming who they were and what leadership traits can be identified in the different categories under scrutiny.

HIST 1999 Big History: From the Big Bang to the Blackberry: 9 semester hours

SAME AS INTDSC 1999. An introduction to the humanities, social science, and science disciplines through a sweeping overview of natural and human history from the Big Bang to the present. Course will include lectures from faculty in various Arts and Sciences units, films, field trips, and group discussions.

HIST 2000 Selected Topics In History: 1-4 semester hours

Prerequisite: consent of instructor Special topics in history. The course may be repeated for credit with consent of the instructor.

HIST 2001 Creating Early America: European Empires, Colonial Cultures, and Native Nations, 1565-1776: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. This content-rich course explores the transatlantic migrations and Indian interactions that laid the foundations of the American nation before 1776.

HIST 2003 United States History: From Nation to Civil War: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Soph standing or consent of the instructor. The "Era of Good Feelings"; the Age of Jackson; manifest destiny; the political and social developments of the antebellum period relating to the growth of sectionalism and the developing antislavery crusade.

HIST 2004 United States History: The Civil War Era, 1860-1900: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor The Civil War, Reconstruction, industrial and urban expansion and their impact on American life.

HIST 2005 The Modernization Of The United States: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor Studies in the economic, political and social development and crises of the maturing industrial United States between 1877 and 1940, and the growing importance of foreign relations.

HIST 2006 Recent United States History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. The economic, political and social developments and crises of post-industrial United States. The role of foreign affairs in American life.

HIST 2007 History Of Missouri: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Lecture and readings. Seventeenth-century Spanish and French explorations and interaction with the Indians; settlement and organization of the Louisiana territory; lead mining and the fur trade; the Louisiana Purchase; the Missouri territory; the struggle for statehood and slavery; antebellum politics; banking and internal improvements; westward expansion; Civil War and reconstruction; postwar agrarian politics, industrialization; Irish, German, and southern European immigration; the Progressive reforms--Political and economic changes; and twentieth-century social changes and political developments. Course satisfies the state requirement.

HIST 2008 History Of St. Louis: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or the consent of the instructor This course will provide an overview of the history of the St. Louis metropolitan region from its founding in 1764 to the present. Main topics will include: the St. Louis region before the Europeans, forces leading to the founding of the city, St. Louis as an "urban frontier", the Age of Steam on water and rail, the questions of slavery and the Civil War, St. Louis in the Gilded Age, the World's Fair, early efforts at city planning, impact of the automobile, St. Louis during the Depression and World War II, post-war suburbanization, urbal renewal St. Louis style, school desegregation, the Schoemehl years, the emergence of St. Louis "Edge Cities", and St. Louis 2004.

HIST 2009 St. Louis And The West: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. An examination of the role St. Louis played in the evolution of the North American West, both in the United States and Canada, from the fur trade of the late eighteenth century to the opening of the Texas oil fields in the early twentieth century. Special emphasis will be given to competition between river and rail transportation corridors, and hence to the rivalry that developed between St. Louis and Chicago.

HIST 2010 From Sea to Shining Sea: The American Frontier 1763 - 1890: 3 semester hours

This is a history of the colonization of the Great West, from the end of the French and Indian War to the official closing of the frontier in 1890. The westward movement will be examined as a major factor in explaining American development.

HIST 2011 American West: The Truth Behind the Hollywood Myths: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor An exploration of the history of the American West from the 1750s to present, with emphasis on the role of transportation. Urban gateways such as St. Louis and San Francisco and transportation corridors such as the Missouri River and the Santa Fe and Oregon trails will be of particular importance.

HIST 2012 The Indian In American History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Investigates Native American encounters with non-Indian peoples between 1600 and 1900, analyzing how traditional Indian cultures changed to meet a variety of new challenges introduced to North America by Europeans and Africans. The approach will be interdisciplinary and ethnohistorical with emphasis placed on case studies of important native nations at key turning points in their history.

HIST 2013 The Rise and Fall of American Cities: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. The physical and spatial growth of U.S. cities from colonial times to the present with special attention to the impact of industrialization, public policy, and advances in transportation technology.

HIST 2015 Topics In African-American History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Will explore a salient topic in African-American history. Such historical documents as personal narratives, letters, government documents, and autobiographies as well as monographs, articles, and other secondary sources will be used to explore topics such as slavery and slave culture in the United States; blacks and America's wars; the African-American intellectual tradition; or, African-Americans and the Great Migration.

HIST 2016 African-American History: From Slavery to Civil Rights: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor: This course examines the impact of region, gender, and class on black activism by focusing on topics such as remembering slavery and emancipation, institution and community building during segregation, changing strategies in politics and protest, and the emergence of the direct action civil rights movement.

HIST 2017 African-American History: From Civil Rights To Black Power: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. A seminar on the activities, ideas, movement centers, and personalities that created the Civil Rights and Black Power movements in the U.S. from the 1950's through the 1970's. Some familiarity with the broad contours of U.S. History is presupposed. Special attention will be devoted to the roles of the African-American masses, college students, and women, and to the points of conflict, cooperation, and intersection between African-America and the larger American society.

HIST 2020 History of Women and Social Movements: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 2020. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. This course explores the history of women and social movements in the nineteenth and twentieth century United States. It considers social and political movements such as abolitionism, women's suffrage, progressivism, the labor movement, the civil rights movement, and second wave feminism.

HIST 2022 The Automobile and American Life: 3 semester hours

This course uses the automobile as a window into 20th-century American life. It examines the influence of automobility on patterns of work and leisure; on struggles over gender, race and ethnicity; on individualism, consumerism, and government regulation. It also surveys mass automobility's effects on our physical and natural environments and looks at future prospects of automobility in the information age.

HIST 2023 US Foreign Relations and Military History To 1900: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructorBulletin description: A survey of American foreign and military affairs to 1900, with particular emphasis on European conflicts, national expansion, Indian Wars, and the Mexican War.

HIST 2024 US Foreign Relations and Military History Since 1900: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. A survey of American foreign and military affairs since 1900, with particular emphasis on the major wars during the period and the cold war era. Consideration of the nation's changing place in a changing world.

HIST 2025 Topics in Military History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. This course will examine a prominent military engagement in the past and consider strategic, diplomatic, and broad cultural aspects of the event. The particular military engagement investigated will vary from one semester to another. May be repeated if topics differ.

HIST 2028 Sex, Drugs, and Rock 'n Roll: The 1960s in Song, Fashion, Dating, and Protest: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. This course examines the turbulent 1960s and the period's identification with sex, drugs, and rock 'n roll by looking historically at drugs, music, and changes in gender roles. It uses these histories to explore the cultural and political movements of the 1960s (1955 through 1973)-civil rights, black power, new left, antiwar, and feminist movements-along with the emergence of the counterculture, hallucinogenic drugs, the sexual revolution, and the whole hip scene. The class is discussion-based. There is a mid-term exam and several assignments, including a class presentation and papers on readings, music, and movies.

HIST 2052 History Of Latin America Since 1808: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Emphasis on the attainment of political independence and social, political, and economic developments of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in Latin America. This course satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

HIST 2053 Modern Mexico: 3 semester hours

Mexico from the Revolution to the present, covering major political, social, and cultural developments of the twentieth century including foreign population migration, the student movement of the 1960s, the rise and fall of the PRI, and the impacts of globalization.

HIST 2063 African Diaspora To Abolition of the Slave Trade: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Comparative in scope, the course examines major themes in West and Central Africa and their impact on the history of Africans in the Atlantic diaspora up to 1800. Themes include: slavery, multi-racialism, economics of the South Atlantic system, political dimensions and the social transformation from heterogeneous crowds to new and homogeneous communities. Linkages between Africans and their descendants in the Atlantic communities of Latin America, the Caribbean, as well as North America will be stressed. This course fulfills the Cultural Diversity requirement.

HIST 2064 African Diaspora in the Age of Migration: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Comparative in scope, this course uses a comparative methodology to examine the major themes in West and Central Africa and their impact on the history of Africans in the Atlantic diaspora after 1800. This course fulfills the Cultural Diversity requirement.

HIST 2081 Rome: The Republic And Empire: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. A survey of the development of Roman political and cultural life from the Legendary founding of the city in central Italy in 753 BC to the death of the Emperor Justinian in 565 AD.

HIST 2082 Christianity: From Jesus to Martin Luther: 3 semester hours

The purpose of this course is to orient students in the scholarship about the Christian Church in the Western tradition as an institution. Open discussion is encouraged, and all traditions will be respected in the interest of expanding our knowledge of the past as well of as the living communities today.

HIST 2083 Europe In Early Middle Ages: Paganism to Christianity: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. The end of the Roman Empire as a universal entity; the successor states of the Mediterranean and Northern Europe; the emergence of a Western Christendom under the Franks; the development of feudal states; the Gregorian reforms; the Crusades; the revival of education and learning in the twelfth century.

HIST 2084 Crusades and Plagues: Europe In The High And Late Middle Ages: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Medieval society at its political, economic, and intellectual zenith; the crisis of the later Middle Ages; the Papal schism and the development of national particular churches within Catholicism; and the rise of estate institutions.

HIST 2085 Medieval England: From Arthur to Richard III: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. A brief summary of the Anglo-Saxon heritage and the impact of the Norman Conquest, followed by an investigation of the institutional, social, and legal evolution of the realm of England. English development will be viewed in its European context.

HIST 2086 Reformation of Europe: Beyond Religion: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Religious, intellectual, political, and socioeconomic developments of the sixteenth century.

HIST 2088 Europe and the Renaissance: Not Just for Painters Anymore: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing or consent of the instructor. The Italian and Northern Renaissance as a distinct age; political, socioeconomic, intellectual, religious, and artistic movements attending the decline of medieval society, and the transition to the early modern period.

HIST 2089 Religion, Philosophy & Science in History: Introduction to The Intellectual History Of The West: 3 semester hours

Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. An examination of some of the most important ideas and debates that shaped the Western world. Topics include Platonic versus Aristotelian models of the universe, Medieval synthesis and the challenge of Renaissance naturalism, the Scientific Revolution, the political ideas of Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, romanticism, Marxism, Darwinian evolution, Freudian psychology, existentialism, structuralism and poststructuralism.

HIST 2090 Europe in the Eighteenth Century:From the Glorious Revolution to the Napoleonic Era: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. This course offers intensive study of Europe in the period between the Glorious Revolution in England in 1688 and the fall of Napoleon in 1815. Particular emphasis will be placed on the theme of the rise of the modern. Specifically, the course will examine the struggle by intellectuals, politicians, and military figures to move Europe forward from the old regime system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the works of Voltaire, Rousseau, Locke,and Paine.

HIST 2091 Europe in the Nineteenth Century: From Waterloo to World War I: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or Consent of Instructor. This course offers intensive study of Europe in the period between the fall of Napoleon in 1815 and the turn-of-twentieth century. Particular emphasis will be placed on the themes of industrialization, overseas colonization, and the development of nationalist, socialist, and liberal ideas.

HIST 2095 History of Ireland: 3 semester hours

This course will explore Irish history from medieval to modern times. Topics will include issues of land, settlement, immigration, and modernization.

HIST 2102 Introduction To Gender Studies: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 2102, SOC WK 2102, and SOC 2102. This core class is required for all Women's and Gender Studies Certificate earners. This class introduces students to cultural, political and historical issues that shape gender. Through a variety of disciplinary perspectives in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, the course familiarizes students with diverse female and male experiences and gendered power relationships.

HIST 2105 Sex in America: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing or consent of the instructor. Dissected, categorized, evaluated, feared, and enjoyed: sex in America's past, including our current obsession with it, is the primary concern of this course. Why and how have sex and sexuality become so central to identities, culture, politics, and now, our history? This course explores the complex and often hidden history of sex in the United States. It uses sex to examine big political ideas of citizenship, democracy, and cultural inclusion.

HIST 2116 History of Greece and The Balkans: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. This course is designed to introduce students to the history of the Balkans with particular emphasis on Greece. Although a part of the course will deal with nation building and nationalism, we will also examine the broad historical trends that have shaped the distinct cultural, social, and political developments in the region from the late 18th century until the end of the 20th century.

HIST 2117 Greek History And Culture: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 2117. Greek civilization has had a deep impact on contemporary society in art; social, political, and economic organization; philosophy; law; medicine; and science. This course covers major aspects of Greek history and culture from antiquity to the present. It considers the major political and military events of Greek History, as well as important aspects of Greek culture, including sports and the history of the Olympic Games, literature, philosophy, and mythology.

HIST 2118 Modern Greek History and Culture: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 2118. A history of Modern Greece, from the fall of Constantinople (1453) to the present, with an emphasis on social, cultural, and political developments. The course will provide a chronological framework of events and it will utilize art, literature, and folklore, along with traditional historical sources, to gain a better understanding of the richness of modern Greek history and culture.

HIST 2219 United States Labor History: 3 semester hours

Examines the history of work and the working class in the United States. It focuses on the transformation of the workplace, the evolution of working class consciousness and the development of the labor movement, the role of race, gender and ethnicity in uniting or dividing the working class, and the nature of labor's relations with other social groups in the political arena. Particular emphasis on the political and economic conditions and strategies of periods when working class power was growing.

HIST 2770 Introduction To Transportation: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Introduction to Transportation provides an overview of the transportation sector, including history, providers, users, and government regulation. The importance and significance of transportation modes of rail, water, motor, air, and pipeline: the demand and supply of transportation, and the managerial aspects of these modes of transport will be covered in the course.

HIST 2772 History Of Aviation In American Life: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophmore standing or consent of instructor. Course focuses on the history of aviation in the United States from balloon flights preceding the Wright brothers through the terrorist attacks in September 2001 with emphasis upon how aviation and aviators have influenced American society and culture. Themes include the evolution of aviation technology, the growth of the commercial/military aviation/aerospace industries, issues of race and gender in aviation, the development of America's commercial airlines, aviation's influence upon American art, films, advertising, and literature, the significance of the space race, and the role of aerial weapons of war.

HIST 2773 Urbanization And Transportation: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Course provides an overview of urbanization and transportation in the United States. Besides examining the history of urbanization and transportation, this course offers comparisons between contemporary international urban areas for the purpose of placing the US experience in context. Additionally, the course covers key issues surrounding the planning, development, and consequences of infrastructure facilitating the movement of people and freight in the urban setting, such as financing, transport technologies, political policies, economic growth, and demographic trends.

HIST 2800 History Of American Economic Development: 3 semester hours

Same as ECON 2800. Prerequisites: ECON 1000 or ECON 1001 or consent of instructor. Uses economic concepts to explain historical developments in the American economy, beginning with the hunter gatherers who crossed the Bering land bridge around 12,000 BC. Main topics include the Native American economies, European exploration and conquest, the colonial economies, indentured servitude, the American Revolution, the US Constitution, westward expansion, transportation, the Industrial Revolution, state banking and free banking, slavery, the Civil War, post-bellum agriculture, the rise of big business and antitrust, banking panics, the Federal Reserve Act, the First and Second World Wars, the New Deal, and the growth of government in postwar economy.

HIST 2999 Introduction to Historical Inquiry: 4 semester hours

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. This course is designed to develop historical thinking skills. Emphasis will be placed on reading of historical sources, exploring the rhetoric of history, identifying perspectives in historical sources, and the process of formulating historical questions. Other topics covered will include proper citation procedures and historiography. The course is writing intensive and will involve primary source research at libraries and archives.

HIST 3000 Selected Topics In History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Special topics in history to be determined by the field, availability of instructors and interest of students. The course may be repeated for credit with the consent of the instructor.

HIST 3031 Modern Japan:From the Meiji Restoration to the Present: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Junior Standing Or Consent Of Instructor. The Economic, Social, And Political Development Of Modern Japan.

HIST 3032 Modern China: From the Decline of the Qing Empire to the Global Age: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Junior Standing Or Consent Of Instructor. The Economic, Social, And Political Development Of Modern China.

HIST 3033 Modern History Of The Asian Pacific Rim: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of the instructor. A course on the modern history of the broad economic region of East and Southeast Asia as well as the region's interaction with the United States. The course is designed for students who need to understand the political and economic dynamics of the countries around the Pacific Basin and the historical roots of various problems.

HIST 3034 History of Technology and Environment in China: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Course explores how the Chinese used technology to manage the economy, environment and disasters which paralleled developments in the West. Discussions on the political function of Chinese science and technology, and on its continued influence on Chinese culture and society.

HIST 3041 Topics In American Constitutional History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Origins and development of the principal institutions and ideas of the American constitutional systems; the role of the constitution and the Supreme Court in the growth of the nation; important Supreme COurt decisions; great American jurists and their impact upon the law; historical background to current constitutional issues.

HIST 3043 History Of Crime And Justice: 3 semester hours

Same as CRIMIN 3043. Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor. The analysis, development, and change in philosophies and responses to crime. Emphasis on major forms and definitions of crime, the emergence of modern policing, the birth of the prison, and the juvenile court system.

HIST 3051 Latin America: From Conquest to Independence: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of Instructor. Latin America from the pre-Columbian Civilizations to 1808, stressing social, political, and economic institutions in the Spanish colonies. This course satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.

HIST 3092 Europe, 1900-1950: War And Upheaval: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of the instructor. The impact of World Wars I and II and the search for equilibrium.

HIST 3093 Europe, 1950-Present: Peace And Prosperity: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor. A survey of the main social, economic, political, military, and cultural trends in Europe since the outbreak of World War II.

HIST 3097 Spain: From Superpower to Napoleon's Puppet: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor A survey of Spanish history from the fifteenth century, emphasizing its period of imperial greatness and examining the effects of empire on national development.

HIST 4001 Special Readings: 1-10 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Independent study through readings, reports and conferences.

HIST 4002 Collaborative Research: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor Faculty-student collaboration on a research project designed to lead toward the publication of a jointly-authored article. The faculty member will direct the research.

HIST 4003 Internship: 3-6 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of Supervising instructor and instituion offering the internship Supervised practicum in a museum, historical agency, and other institution offering an opportunity for hands-on experience in public history. This elective course supplements but does not replace the requirements for a baccalaureate degree in history. May not be taken for graduate credit.

HIST 4014 World History For The Secondary Classroom: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: TCH ED 3310 or consent of the instructor. This course is required for Social Studies certification. Adapts the themes and subject matter of World History to the secondary classroom and trains teachers in techniques particularly designed to maximize the use of primary sources, foster critical inquiry, and encourage knowledge of subject matter. Particular emphasis will be placed on defining the broad and connecting themes of World history, on expanding bibliography, and on choosing methods of inquiry for use in an interactive classroom. Cannot be counted towards the minimum 39-hour history major requirement, but can be counted towards the 45 hour maximum and for Social Studies Certification. Not available for graduate credit.

HIST 4142 Inquiries in U.S. History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: HIST 2999. This course will develop historical thinking and writing skills through investigation in topics in National History.

HIST 4143 Inquiries in World History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: HIST 2999. This course will develop historical thinking and writing skills through investigation in topics in World History.

HIST 4999 Senior Seminar: 5 semester hours

Prerequisites: HIST 2999, consent of department and presentation of three examples of formal written work submitted in prior upper-division courses in history. Studies in historical methodology and historiography. Directed readings, research, and writing leading to the production of an original piece of historical scholarship. An exit interview is required. Senior seminar is required of all history majors. May not be taken for graduate credit.

HIST 5000 Advanced Selected Topics In History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate standing Special topics in history. The course may be repeated for credit with consent of the instructor.

HIST 5142 Advanced Inquiries in U.S. History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course will develop historical thinking and writing skills through investigation in topics in United States history.

HIST 5143 Advanced Inquiries in World History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate standingThis course will develop historical thinking and writing skills through investigation in topics in World history.

HIST 5592 The History of the Visual Arts in American Museums: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 5592 and ART HS 5592. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and consent of instructor. This course is an introduction to selected topics in the history of museology, focusing on art and anthropology museums as sites for the interpretations of art and culture, and as contested meeting grounds for various views of history and culture.

HIST 6000 The Historian's Craft: 1-3 semester hours

This course will introduce incoming students to graduate work, both in the field of history generally and to the M.A. program at UM-St. Louis in particular. It will familiarize them with the fields of historical study and the UMSL faculty who teach them, protocols of the profession, and methodologies of historical research, writing, and analysis. It will also help students learn about and prepare for careers outside the academy and/or Ph.D. programs in the field. Students may be required to attend colloquia off campus.

HIST 6001 Introduction to Public History and Cultural Heritage: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing or Consent of Instructor. This seminar will introduce students to the theory and practice of public history and cultural heritage. Readings will acquaint students with these fields of study and offer commentary on a variety of strategies for making the past relevant for contemporary audiences.

HIST 6013 Historical and Theoretical Foundations of US History in Schools and Communities: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor The intent of this course is to foster critical inquiry into school and public presentations of historical knowledge. Particular emphasis will be placed on defining the broad and connecting themes of U.S. History and the political and cultural struggles that have shapped school curriculum and public discussion since the nineteenth century.

HIST 6014 World History For The Secondary School Classroom: 3-6 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor The intent of this course is to adapt the themes and subject matter of World history to the secondary classroom and to train teachers in the methodology of Socratic symposium, techniuqes designed to maximize the use of sources, foster critical inquiry, and encourage knowledge of subject matter. Particular emphasis will be placed on defining the broad and connecting themes of World history, on expanding bibliography, and on methods for choosing primary sources for use in an interactive classroom. HIST 6014 may not be used to meet history degree requirements.

HIST 6102 Readings In American History Since 1865: 3-5 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. Directed readings and writing on selected topics and areas in American history since 1865.

HIST 6115 Historical Thinking in Theory and Practice I: 3 semester hours

Same as TCH ED 6115. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing or consent of instructor. This course explores theoretical and research literature on historical thinking. It further examines effective teaching strategies and curriculum materials that facilitate historical thinking and reading skills while also broadening content knowledge. It will familiarize students with text and web-based resources available for instruction.

HIST 6116 Historical Thinking in Theory and Practice II: 3 semester hours

Same as HIST 6116. Prerequisites: HIST 6115 / TCH ED 6115 or consent of instructor. Building upon HIST 6115 / TCH ED 6115, this course emphasizes the design, implementation, and assessment of teaching materials and practices that foster historical thinking and reading. In this hands-on, action research course, students will focus on their own teaching materials and practices to improve their capacity to teach and assess students' historical thinking.

HIST 6121 Directed Readings: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of a member of the Doctoral Faculty. Directed research at the graduate level.

HIST 6122 Collaborative Research: 3-6 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and Consent of Instructor Faculty-student collaboration on a research project designed to lead toward the publication of a jointly-authored article. The faculty member will direct the research.

HIST 6123 Thesis Seminar: 1-6 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. Thesis research and writing on a selected topic in history.

HIST 6124 Graduate Internship: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of supervising instructor and institution offering the internship. Supervised practicum in a museum, historical agency, and other instituion offering an opportunity for hands-on experience in public history.

HIST 6125 Practicum in Public History and Cultural Heritage: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing or Consent of Instructor. In collaboration with a designated community partner, students will research and interpret the past for contemporary audiences. The course will combine traditional classroom sessions with hands-on training.

HIST 6130 Collections Management and Registration: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of Director of Museum Studies Program. Most of the institutions that we call museums collect objects. A collecting institution requires a collections manager or a registrar to track, manage, and insure the safety of its objects, whether it collects art, artifacts, specimens, or live organisms. This course covers collections care and management from acquisition to evaluation, documentation, care, storage (or maintenance), loans, exhibitions, contracts, risk preparedness, and policy-making. It focuses on the practical knowledge and skills needed for collections management and registration. While much of the course material is drawn from historical, ethnographic, and art collections, the basic principles apply broadly to all collecting institutions.

HIST 6131 Museum Origins and Evolution: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of Director of Museum Studies Program. This course traces the social and cultural history of museums from their origins in curiosity cabinets, princely collections, freak shows, and exhibitions, through their late 19th and early 20th century institutionalization, to present-day developments such as blockbuster exhibitions, community collaborations, masterpiece architecture, and the spread of museal and heritage institutions around the globe. Topics include colonialism, modernity, and the production of taxonomical knowledge; museums and nationalism; theories of culture, patrimony, and ownership; manufacture, marketing, and museums; the relationships between museums and academia; identity politics and culture wars; community-based initiatives; and virtual and digital museum spaces.

HIST 6132 Digital Video for Museums and Community History: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of Director of Museum Studies Program. This course covers basic production and post-production in digital video, and examines how digital video has been and can be used for community history projects and museum installations. Students will learn basics of shooting, lighting, sound, scripting, and non-linear editing; interviewing and observational footage; and produce a series of documentary shorts. Readings will include the special characteristics of the cinematic medium and case studies of digital video for community-based research, advocacy, and museum audiences.

HIST 6133 Museums and History in the Digital Age: 3 semester hours

This course introduces and explores the key issues, analyses, critical debates, opportunities and potential drawbacks for museums and public historians using digital media to engage with communities. Students will gain facility in implementing digital strategies for museum and public history initiatives, including how to plan, manage, and assess the success of media projects.

HIST 6134 History Curatorship: 5 semester hours

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. Principles and practices of curatorship in history museums. Historiography and research in material culture; theoretical foundations; methodologies for collecing and curating collections; legal and ethical issues; interpretation; role of the history curator in exhibit and program development; responsibilities to the community.

HIST 6135 Foundations Of Museology I: 3 semester hours

Same as ART HS 6035 and ANTHRO 6135. Prerequisites: Consent of Director of Museum Studies Program. Concepts for understanding museums in their social and cultural context; history of museums; museology and general social theory; information transfer vs meaning-making models; museums and communities; the changing role of museums; museums as complex organizations; process models of museology.

HIST 6137 Museum Organization and Operations: 3 semester hours

Same as ART HS 6037 and ANTHRO 6137. Prerequisites: Consent of Director of Museum Studies Program. This course looks at museum organization and operations in the 21st century. As museums become more focused on visitors, communities, and private donors, their structures, staffing, and practices have changed. This course introduces students to the wide range of museum professions, the evolving function of museums, the effects of new technologies, and the challenges of administration and funding in constrained economic circumstances. The course includes scrutiny of ethical issues such as disputed collections, intellectual property rights, organizational conflicts, and community collaboration and planning.

HIST 6138 Museum Studies Master's Project: 5 semester hours

Same as ART HS 6038 and ANTHRO 6138. Prerequisites: Consent of Director of Museum Studies Program. Research and writing/ exhibit development on a selected topic.

HIST 6140 Readings in Metropolitan History: 3-5 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate StandingDirected readings and writing on selected topics and areas in Metropolitan History.

HIST 6141 Readings in Regional History: 3-5 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate StandingDirected readings and writing on selected topics and areas in Regional History.

HIST 6142 Readings in U.S. History: 3-5 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. Directed readings and writing in selected topics and areas in United States History.

HIST 6143 Readings in World History: 3-5 semester hours

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. Directed readings and writing on selected topics and areas in World History.

HIST 6150 Directed Readings in Metropolitan History: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of a member of the graduate faculty. Directed readings and research at the graduate level.

HIST 6151 Directed Readings in Regional History: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of a member of the graduate faculy. Directed readings and research at the graduate level.

HIST 6152 Directed Readings in U.S. History: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of a member of the graduate faculty. Directed readings and research at the graduate level.

HIST 6153 Directed Readings in Worldl History: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of a member of the graduate faculty. Directed readings and research at the graduate level.

Louis Gerteis
Professor and Chair
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin

Mark A. Burkholder
Curators' Professor
Ph.D., Duke University

Maris Gillette
E. Desmond Lee Professor of Museum Studies and Community History
Ph.D., Harvard University
Anthropology

Carlos A. Schwantes
Saint Louis Mercantile Library Professor of Transportation Studies
Ph.D., University of Michigan

Andrew J. Hurley
Professor
Ph.D., Northwestern University
Certificate in Public History and Cultural Heritage

Steven W. Rowan
Professor
Ph.D., Harvard University

Kevin J. Fernlund
Professor
Ph.D., University of New Mexico

Robert M. Bliss
Associate Professor and Dean of Pierre Laclede Honors College
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin

Priscilla Dowden-White
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Indiana-Bloomington

J. Frederick Fausz
Associate Professor
Ph.D., William and Mary

Adell Patton Jr.
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin

Gerda W. Ray
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

Laura Westhoff
Associate Professor
Ph.D., Washington University

Deborah Cohen
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Chicago

Minsoo Kang
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles

Peter Acsay
Associate Teaching Professor
Ph.D., Saint Louis University

John Hoover
Adjunct Professor Director of St. Louis Mercantile Library
M.A., University of Missouri-Columbia

John R. Gillingham
Founders Professor
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

Jay Rounds
Founders Professor
Ph.D., University of California-Los Angeles

Richard H. Mitchell
Curators' Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin

Blanche M. Touhill
Professor Emerita and Chancellor Emerita
Ph.D., St. Louis University

Jerry M. Cooper
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin

Paul Corby Finney
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., Harvard University

Steven C. Hause
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., Washington University

Charles P. Korr
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles

William S. Maltby
Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., Duke University

Winston Hsieh
Associate Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., Harvard University

John A. Works Jr.
Associate Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin