English

Undergraduate Studies

General Education Requirements

All undergraduate english majors must meet the university and college general education requirements.

English courses may be used to meet the university's humanities requirement, except for the following:

ENGL 1100First-Year Writing (MOTR ENGL 200)3
ENGL 1110First-Year Writing for International Students3
ENGL 2120Topics in Writing3
ENGL 2810Traditional Grammar3
ENGL 3090Turning the Kaleidoscope: How We Look at Texts3
ENGL 3100Junior-Level Writing3
ENGL 3110Junior-Level Writing for International Students3
ENGL 3120Business Writing3
ENGL 3130Technical Writing3
ENGL 3150Feature Writing3
ENGL 3160Writing in the Sciences3
ENGL 3180Reporting3
ENGL 4860Editing and the Production Process3
ENGL 4880Writing for Teachers3
ENGL 4890Writing Internship3
Total Hours45

The college's foreign language requirement may be met in any language.

Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Option

Majors may take no more than 6 satisfactory/unsatisfactory hours in the department. Any English course may be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis except the following:

ENGL 1100First-Year Writing3
ENGL 1110First-Year Writing for International Students3
ENGL 3090Writing about Literature3
ENGL 3100Junior-Level Writing3
ENGL 3110Junior-Level Writing for International Students3
ENGL 3120Business Writing3
ENGL 3130Technical Writing3
ENGL 3160Writing in the Sciences3

Degree Requirements

Bachelor of Arts in English

English majors must complete at least 39, but no more than 48, hours in English exclusive of:

ENGL 1100First-Year Writing3
ENGL 1110First-Year Writing for International Students3
Junior-Level Writing Requirement3

 Students majoring in English must take one three-hour 2000-level course in each of the following areas: Literature in English, Language and Language Studies, and Creative Writing. Collectively, the three 2000-level courses introduce all majors to the intellectual work people in English Studies do, and to explore the range of skills, processes, areas of knowledge, and practices we work with and the texts we produce.

Literature in English3
Introduction to Poetry
Introduction to Fiction
Hey, Have You Read ______?
Drama: The Greatest Hits
Language and Writing3
Rhetorical Ways with Words
Literate Lives
Introduction to English Language Variety
Creative Writing3
Introduction to Creative Writing
Beginning Poetry Writing Workshop
Beginning Fiction Writing
Total Hours9

Junior-Level Writing Requirement

Students choose one three-hour course from the following list to meet the junior-level writing requirement:

ENGL 3090Writing about Literature 13
ENGL 3100Junior-Level Writing3
ENGL 3110Junior-Level Writing for International Students3
ENGL 3120Business Writing3
ENGL 3130Technical Writing3
ENGL 3160Writing in the Sciences3
HONORS 3100Honors Advanced Composition: Writing The City3

3000 Level Major Courses: required total of 9 hours, at least six of which are literature.

Courses at this level feature a more narrow range of content, deepening the skills and habits of mind learned at the 2000 level. 

One 3000-level British Literature Course3
One 3000-level American Literature Course3
An additional 3000-level English Course3
Total Hours9

4000 Level Courses: required total of 12 hours. Pre-requisite: students must pass all three 2000-level core curriculum courses before enrolling in 4000-level courses.

Senior level courses are more specialized in content and more challenging in the kinds of work students produce. A wide range of these is available, in literature in English, writing and language, and creative writing. A student can focus on one of those three areas or may remain a generalist. 

Electives: 9 hours of English courses at any level, exclusive of courses used to satisfy the first-year and junior-level writing requirements.

 

 B.S. Ed. in Secondary Education with Emphasis in English

The B.S. Ed. is a professional education degree designed for students who wish to pursue a teaching career in secondary schools.  Much of the discipline-specific coursework parallels the B.A. or B.S. degree in the discipline; however, the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) requires specific coursework for teacher certification.  Therefore, students interested in the B.S. Ed. should contact the advising office (OASIS) 314-516-5937 in the College of Education for discipline-specific requirements.  Note:  To obtain teaching certification, DESE requires a 3.0 GPA in the discipline and professional education coursework, as well as a 2.75 GPA overall. 

B.A. or in English with Master’s Level Coursework for Secondary Teacher Certification

In addition to the B.S. Ed., students may opt to complete a B.A. or B.S. degree in their discipline as an undergraduate, followed by admission to the Graduate School for Master’s level teaching certification.  The College of Education has a one-year accelerated program for post-graduate certification called Teach in 12, or students can choose a traditional path to certification.  Graduate coursework for certification can apply towards a Master’s Degree in Secondary Education, with additional coursework.  Students interested in Master’s Level teacher certification should contact the advising office (OASIS) 314-516-5937 in the College of Education.  Note:  To obtain teaching certification, DESE requires a 3.0 GPA in the discipline and professional education coursework, as well as a 2.75 GPA overall. 

Minor in English

A student may minor in English by taking at least 18 hours of English courses exclusive of Basic Writing, ENGL 1100, First Year Writing, and ENGL 1110, First Year Writing for International Students. ENGL 3090 is required, and 12 of the 18 hours must be in literature courses, 9 of which must be in courses at the 3000 or 4000 level. Every student taking a minor in English must consult with an adviser in the English department to ensure a coherent program of studies. The GPA in courses for the minor must be 2.0 or better. Nine of the 18 hours must be taken in residence at UMSL. No more than 3 hours taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis may be counted toward the 18-hour minimum.

Professional Writing Certificate

Students earn the Professional Writing Certificate by completing 18 hours in selected writing courses with a grade point average of 3.0 or better. Twelve of the 18 hours must be taken at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Courses may not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Students who wish to pursue a technical writing emphasis should contact the Coordinator for information about appropriate courses and internships.

Professional Writing Courses
MEDIA ST 2212Broadcast Writing And Reporting3
ENGL/MEDIA ST 2080Advertising Copywriting3
ENGL 3140/MEDIA ST 3214News Writing3
ENGL/MEDIA ST 3150Feature Writing3
ENGL 3180Reporting3
ENGL 3280/MEDIA ST 2228Public Relations Writing3
ENGL 4160Special Topics In Writing3
ENGL 4810English Grammar3
ENGL 4850Topics In The Teaching Of Writing1-3
ENGL 4860Editing3
ENGL 4870Advanced Business And Technical Writing3
ENGL 4880Writing For Teachers3
Academic Writing Courses
ENGL 2120Topics In Writing3
ENGL 2810Traditional Grammar3
ENGL 3090Writing about Literature3
ENGL 3100Junior-Level Writing3
HONORS 3100Honors Advanced Composition: Writing The City3
ENGL 3110Junior Level Writing For International Students3
ENGL 3120Business Writing3
ENGL 3130Technical Writing3
ENGL 3160Writing In The Sciences3
Creative Writing Courses
Students may take up to 2 creative writing courses.
ENGL 2040Beginning Fiction Writing3
ENGL 3030Poetry Writing Workshop3
ENGL 3040Fiction Writing Workshop: Narrative Techniques3
ENGL 4130Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop3
ENGL 4140Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop3
ENGL 4895Editing "Litmag3
Capstone Course
ENGL 4890Writing Internship (Required. Usually taken as the last course in the program. Must include an extensive final project.)3
ENGL 4892Independent Writing Project3

When the student has completed requirements for the certificate, the coordinator will notify the university registrar and the college from which the student will graduate. Upon the student’s graduation, completion of the Professional Writing Certificate will be noted on the official transcript and a certificate will be mailed to the student’s residence. Students who have graduated before completing the Professional Writing Certificate will receive the certificate in the mail and will have the certificate entered on their official transcripts.

Creative Writing Certificate

Students earn the Certificate in Writing by completing 18 hours in selected writing courses with a grade point average of 3.0 or better. Twelve of the 18 hours must be taken at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Courses may not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Students in the creative writing emphasis produce original fiction or poetry. Courses in creative nonfiction, editing, feature writing and copywriting may also be taken for this emphasis.

Students should choose courses for the certificate with the guidance of the Writing Certificate Coordinator. Students electing English 4890 as part of the certificate should meet with the coordinator to arrange the internship.

To receive this certificate, the student must take 18 hours chosen from the courses listed below.

Select at least two of the following courses (at least one must be a 4000-level course):6
Poetry Writing Workshop
Fiction Writing Workshop: Narrative Techniques
Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop
Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop
Editing "Litmag
2000-level Courses
Students may take no more than two 2000-level courses.
ENGL 2040Beginning Fiction Writing3
ENGL 2330Introduction To Poetry3
ENGL 2340Introduction To Drama3
Creative Writing Courses
ENGL 3030Poetry Writing Workshop3
ENGL 3040Fiction Writing Workshop: Narrative Techniques3
ENGL 3090Writing about Literature3
ENGL 3100Junior-Level Writing3
ENGL 4130Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop3
ENGL 4140Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop3
ENGL 4160Special Topics In Writing3
ENGL 4890Writing Internship3
ENGL 4892Independent Writing Project3
ENGL 4895Editing "Litmag3
Professional Writing Courses
Students are encouraged to take at least one professional writing course, but no more than two.
ENGL/MEDIA ST 2080Advertising Copywriting3
ENGL/MEDIA ST 3150Feature Writing3
ENGL 4860Editing3

Students may use ENGL 4895, ENGL 4890, ENGL 4140, or ENGL 4130 as their capstone course. If ENGL 4890 is used, it will be an internship in literary publishing, feature writing, or advertising copywriting. To use ENGL 4130 or ENGL 4140, the student must obtain the teacher’s permission and do extra work in the course. The Editing Litmag course, ENGL 4895, may also be used as the final course for this certificate.

When the student has completed requirements for the certificate, the coordinator will notify the university registrar and the college from which the student will graduate. Upon the student’s graduation, completion of the Creative Writing Certificate will be noted on the official transcript and a certificate will be mailed to the student’s residence. Students who have graduated before completing the Creative Writing Certificate will receive the certificate in the mail and will have the certificate entered on their official transcripts.

 

Online Certificate in Technical Writing

Students earn the Online Certificate in Technical Writing by completing 18 hours in selected online writing courses with a grade point average of 3.0 or better, including a capstone course. Twelve of the 18 hours must be taken at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Courses may not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

UMSL Courses
ENGL 3120Business Writing3
ENGL 3130Technical Writing3
ENGL 3160Writing In The Sciences3
ENGL 4870Advanced Business And Technical Writing3
ENGL 4871Publishing: Writers, Editors, and Readers 13
ENGL 4872Technical Presentations 13
ENGL 4890Writing Internship3
ENGL 4892Independent Writing Project3
Missouri S&T Courses
ENGLISH 3560Technical Writing3
TCH COM 2560Technical Marketing Communication3
TCH COM 3440Theory of Visual Technical Communication3
TCH COM 4085 Internship in Technical Communication (individual enrollment)3
TCH COM 4450International Dimensions of Technical Communication3
TCH COM 4530Help Authoring3
TCH COM 4450Proposal Writing3
TCH ED 5510Technical Editing3
TCH COM 5530Usability Studies3
TCH ED 5560Web-Based Communication3
TCH COM 5610History of Technical Communication3
TCH COM 5620Reasearch Methods in Technical Communication3
1

 Pending Faculty Senate approval.

Students may use ENGL 4890,ENGL 4892, ENGL 4870, ENGL 4871, and ENGL 4872 as their capstone course.

When the student has completed requirements for the certificate, the coordinator will notify the university registrar and the college from which the student will graduate. Upon the student’s graduation, completion of the Online Technical Writing Certificate will be noted on the official transcript and a certificate will be mailed to the student’s residence. Students who have graduated before completing the Online Technical Writing Certificate will receive the certificate in the mail and will have the certificate entered on their official transcripts.

Graduate Studies

 

Admission Requirements

To enter the graduate program in English a candidate must satisfy the requirements both of the Graduate School and the Department of English. A candidate should have a bachelor’s degree, with at least 18 hours in English above the freshmen level, 12 of which must be in literature. Normally, only students with a grade point average of 3.0 in undergraduate English courses and an overall undergraduate average of 2.75 will be considered. Though the English department welcomes scores from the Graduate Record Aptitude Exam and letters of recommendation, it does not require either of these. (Students applying for Teaching Assistantships, please see “Financial Aid and Teaching Assistantships.”)

The graduate coordinator of the English Department with the advice of the graduate committee will use the undergraduate record and, and if available, the scores of the GRE general test as the basis for a decision. We welcome letters of recommendation from the applicant’s former English instructors and a sample of expository prose. Applications to the MA in English are considered at all times. However, because spaces in graduate courses are limited, it is strongly advised that prospective students submit their applications well before the semester begins in order to gain admission into their appropriate classes.

Teaching Assistantships

A number of teaching assistantships are available for qualified applicants. In addition to the undergraduate record and the scores on the GRE general test, applications should include two letters of recommendation from former English instructors. Applications should be submitted to the graduate coordinator of the English department no later than March 15 preceding the academic year for which the appointment is desired.

Degree Requirements

Master of Arts in English

In addition to the Graduate School requirements, students must complete at least 36 hours, 24 hours of which must be in 5000-level courses. Twelve hours may be taken in 4000-level courses approved by the department and Graduate School.

Required of both concentrations, literature and writing studies:

  • ENGL 5000: Introduction to Graduate Study in English. Focuses upon bibliography, research methods, and literary criticism. Should be taken at the outset of the program, for graduate (not undergraduate) credit.

Students who choose a literature track must also take at least one course in each of the following six areas:

  • Area 1, British literature before 1660
  • Area 2, British literature between 1660 and 1900
  • Area 3, Twentieth-century literature (British, American, post-colonial, or in translation)
  • Area 4, American literature
  • Area 5, Theories of writing, criticism, language, and/or culture
  • Area 6, Literature in translation study of a particular literary genre, or a course in another relevant discipline

Students who choose the writing studies track must take:

  • 18 hours in literature courses providing broad coverage rather than a narrow focus on a particular genre or historical period (ENGL 5000 constitutes three of these required literature credits)
  • 18 hours in writing studies courses (including ENGL 5840)

If students choose the thesis option (6 hours) they will take 15 hours in literature and 15 hours in writing studies.

Thesis Options

Students may elect the thesis option, which requires a total of 6 hours of thesis credit. The thesis will engage the student in sustained and self-motivated study through the processes of research, conferring with advisors, drafting and revising text. The thesis must be approved and assigned a grade by a thesis committee. The student will select a major professor who, after consulting with the chair and the graduate coordinator, will select two other members of the committee.

Literature Emphasis: The thesis should demonstrate original thought and substantial research and may be a critical study of literary works or a theoretical exploration of issues related to literature.

Writing Studies Emphasis: The final document will demonstrate significant familiarity with scholarship in Writing Studies through the critical analysis and clear synthesis of published research, observational data (where appropriate) and the student’s thoughts/views/reflections/positions. The thesis may be a critical study, theoretical exploration or descriptive assessment of fieldwork drawing on writing, language, rhetorical, socio-cultural or reading theories; literacy; and the history of writing instruction; composition pedagogies; technologies.

 

Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing

The application process is identical to that for the master of arts degree, with these exceptions: there is one annual deadline for all applications, Feb. 15; a writing sample is required (15-20 poems or 20-40 pages of fiction); the GRE test is required only if the applicant seeks financial aid or a teaching assistantship.

In addition to the Graduate School requirements, students must complete at least 39 hours, 30 of which must be in 5000-level courses. Nine hours may be taken in 4000-level courses approved by the department and Graduate School. Students will specialize in one genre, poetry or fiction. They must complete the following course work: 15 hours of workshops, three hours of literary journal editing (ENGL 5190), 3 hours of either ENGL 5170 or ENGL 5180 depending on specialization (fiction writers take ENGL 5170 and poets take ENGL 5180), 3 hours thesis (ENGL 6010). Total designated hours, 24. Any of the following can make up the remaining 15 hours, but we especially recommend the first three:

  1. ENGL 5180 for fiction writers and ENGL 5170 for poets, the opposite of the students’ specialization.
  2. A contemporary literature class offered by the MFA program or the MA program
  3. A composition theory course, recommended mainly for those who want to teach later
  4. another workshop
  5. ENGL 5190, literary journal editing, a second time
  6. Any other graduate level class in literature, linguistics, or composition offered by the Department of English
  7. 5200-MFA readings course, or an independent study-IF you can find someone to work with you.
  8. Up to 3 (9 hours) of 4000 level undergrad lit or linguistics classes offered by the Department of English, recommended especially for those without an English background.
  9. One three hour class outside the Department of English, at least a 4000 level, and with all needed permissions from both departments that will enhance the student’s writing.

Complete information may be found in The Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing, available from the English department.

 

Graduate Certificate in the Teaching of Writing, Gateway Writing Project.

Jointly housed in the Division of Teaching and Learning and the Department of English, this Graduate Certificate prepares teachers at all levels (K-12, college, adult) to improve their students’ performance in writing. The program also emphasizes using writing as a means to promote learning in all content areas. All courses provide opportunities for teachers to write, revise, share feedback, and reflect on their own writing development. Based on the National Writing Project’s core belief that teachers of writing must themselves be writers, the Graduate Certificate in the Teaching of Writing brings together sound pedagogy, composition theory, and writing practice.

The Certificate is an 18-hour program through the Gateway Writing Project (GWP); it may also be coordinated with other graduate programs. Certificate courses may be applicable to the M.A. in English with emphasis in composition or to various M.Ed. programs. The GWP Certificate is especially appropriate for post-master’s candidates who wish to pursue a specialization in teaching writing. The Graduate Certificate in the Teaching of Writing requires a 12 semester-hour core of courses developed by the Gateway Writing Project: The GWP invitational institute (6 hrs), a designated “topics” course (3 hrs.), and an exit course (3 hrs.). The Certificate requires a minimum of 12 semester hours at the 5000 or 6000 level or above. Electives (6 hrs.) may be chosen from approved offerings in English or Education.

Admission

Applicants must be admitted to Graduate School and be selected by the faculty admissions committee for the Gateway Writing Project’s Certificate in the Teaching of Writing. The committee will review candidates on the basis of an interview, an application essay, and supporting documentation. Criteria include experience teaching writing at any level and academic record, especially in writing and the teaching of writing.

Prerequisites

 

ENGL/SEC ED 4880Writing For Teachers (or an equivalent course in teaching writing )3
Coursework or competency in basic computer application.

Required Core Courses

ENGL 4850/TCH ED 5850Topics In The Teaching Of Writing (designated topics)3
ENGL 6880Gateway Writing Project6
TCH ED 6890Seminar In Professional Writing For Teachers (exit course)3
Total Hours12

Electives

Electives may be chosen from other Gateway Writing Project offerings or from courses offered by the appropriate academic department with advisor’s approval. These electives must include at least one more 5000-6000 level course.

Electives6
Suggested electives applicable to an MA in English with writing emphasis:
Modern Linguistics
Theories Of Writing
Writing/Reading Theory
Composition Research
Teaching College Writing
Suggested electives applicable to an M.Ed. in Elementary or Secondary Education ELE:
Literacy Acquisition And Learning For Diverse Students
Problems And Research In Teaching Elementary School
Action Research In Education
Total Hours6

Courses in adult and higher education may also be appropriate. For complete information, see The GatewayWriting Project’s Graduate Certificate in Teaching Writing, available from the English Department, the Division of Teaching and Learning, and the GWP Director.

English Department Learning Outcomes

The English Department offers the bachelor of arts degree and has identified what students will know and be able to do after completing the program. Explore this page to learn more about the opportunities the program provides. Click a shortcut to jump down to view the minors and certificates.

Major
Minor
Professional Writing Certificate
Creative Writing Certificate
Technical Writing Certificate

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in English

English BA Graduates Will Be Strong Writers, Compose Ideas with Clarity and Utilize Effective Writing Processes. They Will:

  • Experiment with and enact various textual and discursive forms
  • Integrate audience expectations and/or needs into texts they create
  • Challenge audience expectations when appropriate 
  • Construct purposeful texts
    • (i.e. texts may include but are not limited to: literature, rhetoric, language, film, music, and other media/interactions)
  • Practice revision processes, with complexity and concision complementing each other
  • Make use of grammatically and mechanically correct prose when the rhetorical situation requires it
  • Adapt and experiment with grammatical and mechanical conventions when the rhetorical situation requires it

English BA Graduates Participate in Conversations via Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, and Critical Thinking. They Will:

  • Read, write, and interact with a variety of texts
    • Read broadly and widely
    • Read closely and critically
  • Engage with increasingly complex texts as readers and writers
  • Contribute their own perspectives to scholarly and public conversations involving texts they read
  • Develop their own ideas and elaborate on them in relation to the ideas of others
    • Discuss texts thoughtfully, inside and outside of classrooms
    • Listen to others and synthesize perspectives when discussing texts
  • Develop and master listening rhetorically, and listening to understand, not merely to argue against.

English BA Graduates Will Engage with a Wide Variety of Texts and Become Astute Analysts and Creators. They will:

  • Define and describe texts
  • Identify patterns in texts
  • Analyze patterns in texts
  • Make claims based on evidence found in texts
  • Develop and propose alternative claims about texts
  • Create original texts in response to texts
  • Create and articulate original ideas in texts

English BA Graduates Will Be Culturally and Historically Aware Citizens and Professionals. They will:

  • Explore and explain the interrelatedness of texts with culture, race, ethnicity, gender, disability, sexuality, class, and power, and the intersectional and sometimes fluid nature of such concepts  
  • Articulate worldviews from varied perspectives and evidence-based positions
  • Discuss the historical dimensions and contemporary implications of texts
  • Explore the structure and history of the English language
  • Demonstrate strong social awareness

English Minor

English Minor Graduates Will Be Able To:

  • Demonstrate a knowledge that what counts as text is broader than traditionally assumed
  • Interpret and compose for numerous contexts
  • Demonstrate knowledge about audience and apply that understanding in shaping texts
  • Compose purposeful texts
  • Exhibit the ability to practice revision processes
  • Make use of correct grammar and writing mechanics when rhetorically appropriate
  • Engage with sources
  • Analyze texts
  • Develop and propose claims about texts
  • Respond to texts with originality and purpose
  • Contribute to scholarly and public conversations
  • View the world from varied perspectives and evidence-based positions
  • Apply skills and knowledge from the minor into their major course of study
  • Discuss texts thoughtfully, inside and outside of classrooms
  • Listen to others and synthesize perspectives when discussing texts

Professional Writing Certificate

Students will be able to:

  • Write clearly, correctly, and concisely
  • Develop knowledge of how writing impacts work and behavior in professional settings
  • Employ a repertoire of writing strategies and practices in the workplace
  • Effectively adapt content to a variety of professional audiences
  • Discern the appropriate tone, style, and format needed for a given writing purpose, audience, and context
  • Demonstrate advanced knowledge of rhetorical strategies to achieve specific results
  • Practice solid revision and editing skills
  • Integrate expectations about professional standards and persuasive, content-based thinking into their written communication
  • Recognize and adjust to expectations in the global workplace setting.
  • Develop a portfolio of professional writing that would serve in a job search
  • Work independently and collaboratively on complex professional documents
  • Adapt to new writing challenges quickly

Creative Writing Certificate

Students will be able to:

  • Identify and execute particular techniques of the genre, such as characterization, plot, dialogue, metaphor, meter, and rhyme
  • Improve, sharpen, and extend these techniques in their own writing through revision
  • Demonstrate practice in multiple creative writing genres
  • Reflect on their own work in the context of literary traditions and aesthetic points of view
  • Possess the ability to critically read and analyze the work of others
  • Incorporate constructive criticism into the revising process
  • Provide critical feedback to other writers during their creative process
  • Experiment with literary traditions to break tradition
  • Explain how different genres inform and intersect with one another
  • Pursue ideas, techniques, and forms that are outside their comfort zone
  • Demonstrate how professional publishing and editing functions, including how and where to send their work for publication
  • Market their skills set as creative writers for employment

Technical Writing Certificate

Students will be able to:

  • Revise and edit texts efficiently
  • Adjust style, tone, and format to best suit a professional context
  • Develop rhetorical flexibility as it pertains to shifting professional writing expectations
  • Identify various readers and stakeholders, and the situations in which they both operate
  • Accurately compose language that meets the needs of readers and stakeholders
  • Identify and solve real world problems via writing/composition
  • Design and create texts in various modes (e.g. digital, videos, alphabetic, auditory, and multiple/combined modes)
  • Demonstrate an ability to apply contextually appropriate rhetorical strategies and technologies to solve communication problems successfully and safely

 
 

Sample Four Year Plan 

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
INTDSC 100311ENGL 23603
CORE - First Year Writing3ENGL 20203
CORE - Mathematics Proficiency3CORE - Communication Proficiency3
Foreign Language 10015Foreign Language 10025
EXPLORE - Social Sciences3 
 15 14
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ENGL 24103ENGL 37103
ENGL 33203ENGL 35303
Foreign Language 21013CORE - Information Literacy3
CORE - US History & Goverment3EXPLORE - Social Sciences3
EXPLORE - Math & Sciences3EXPLORE - Humanities & Fine Arts (non English)3
 15 15
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ENGL 30903ENGL 4000 Level3
ENGL 4000-level course3ENGL elective3
ENGL elective 3EXPLORE - Math & Sciences3
EXPLORE - Social Sciences3Elective or minor6
EXPLORE - Math & Sciences3 
 15 15
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ENGL 4000+ level course3ENGL 4000+ level course3
ENGL elective3Elective or minor13
Elective or minor9 
 15 16
Total Hours: 120

Please Note: This plan is an example of what a four year plan could look like for a typical student. Placement exam scores in math as well as the completion of coursework may change the plan. It should not be used in the place of regular academic advising appointments. All students are encouraged to meet with their advisor each semester. All requirements are subject to change.

Courses

ENGL 1100 First-Year Writing (MOTR ENGL 200): 3 semester hours

Integrates critical reading, writing, and thinking skills and studies actual writing practices. Sequenced reading and writing assignments build cumulatively to more complex assignments. Includes formal and informal writing, drafting and revising, editing for correctness, synthesizing source material, and documenting sources accurately. Fulfills 3 hours of the General Education requirement for Communicating Skills. Does not count toward the major in English.

ENGL 1110 First-Year Writing for International Students: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Essay proficiency test or a TOFEL score of 500 or above. Designed for any student whose first language is not English. Integrates critical reading, writing, and thinking skills and studies actual writing practices. Sequenced reading and writing assignments build cumulatively to more complex assignments. Includes formal and informal writing, drafting and revising, editing for correctness, synthesizing source material, and documenting sources accurately. Special attention given to verb tenses, idioms, articles, and syntax. Does not count toward the major in English. Substitutes for ENGL 1100 in all university requirements.

ENGL 1120 Introduction to Literature (MOTR LITR 100): 3 semester hours

The student is introduced to the various literary types, including poetry, drama, fiction, and the essay.

ENGL 1170 American Literary Masterpieces: 3 semester hours

An introduction to major authors, works, and themes in American Literature from the nineteenth century to the present.

ENGL 1710 Native American Literature: 3 semester hours

Same as ANTHRO 1710. The course surveys the literature of American Indians from its oral tradition of myth, legend, song and oratory through its modern forms. The course satisfies the ethnic literature requirement for Missouri state certification in secondary education and the cultural diversity requirement.

ENGL 1800 Reading Life: 3 semester hours

This course teaches college-level reading in the Humanities. The course primarily covers written texts, but may also include various genres in music, television and film, and theater. The course may be counted towards the major or minor in English.

ENGL 1950 Topics in Literature: 3 semester hours

This course will introduce the student to selected literary topics and/or genres. Each semester the department will announce topics and course content. Topics such as alienation, justice, and the absurd, and genres such as science fiction and contemporary drama are typical possibilities.

ENGL 2020 Introduction to Creative Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. This course is a creative writing survey and workshop focusing on the study of three genres—short fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Students learn primary concepts and techniques of craft, including narrative, voice, character, setting, imagery, metaphor, point-of-view. Students will explore literary conventions specific to each genre, as well as universal qualities that make all writing effective for an audience. The course requires three different kinds of writing: brief analytic essays, open-ended exploratory exercises, and carefully-revised original work. This course fulfills the core requirement in Creative Writing and counts toward the Certificate in Writing.

ENGL 2040 Fiction Writing Jumpstart: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. This course provides exercises, discussions, models, and practice for discovering short stories and the many ways to tell them. Students will read published short stories to learn how other writers have worked with point of view, distance, voice, plot, dialogue, setting, and characterization. Students will also write exercises and stories workshop critique. Students who have taken ENGL 2060 may not take ENGL 2040 for credit. The course fulfills the core requirement in Creative Writing and counts toward the Certificate in Writing.

ENGL 2080 Advertising Copywriting: 3 semester hours

Same as MEDIA ST 2080. To give students a hands-on approach for writing advertising material for print and broadcast against tight deadlines in a professional setting.

ENGL 2110 Information Literacy: 3 semester hours

Designed especially for humanities and fine arts majors, this course introduces students to the main components of information literacy, including digital, web, and media literacies as well as library databases. Students work with both digital and print materials to find, evaluate, and synthesize information while applying the critical thinking habits of questioning and reasoning. Frequent writing and multimedia assignments will provide practice in using various technologies to assemble and to share information.

ENGL 2120 Topics in Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1110. This course will introduce the student to writing in specific areas. The department will announce topics and course content in the schedule. Possible topics are argumentation, reading and writing about public affairs, sports reporting and writing, and writing about science. A student may repeat the course once when topics are different. The course counts toward the certificate in writing.

ENGL 2125 Introduction to Technical Communication: 3 semester hours

This course introduces students to the role of the professional technical communicator in business and industry. Students will explore methods of developing technical documents, including critical analysis, information design, and rhetorical expression.

ENGL 2160 Introduction to American Studies: 3 semester hours

Same as HIST 2160. This course introduces students to the multidisciplinary nature of American Studies and is a required course for those who wish to complete the minor in American Studies. It reviews the discipline from its origins in the 1930s, and it introduces students to St Louis' rich resources for American Studies.

ENGL 2240 Literature of the Old Testament: 3 semester hours

A comprehensive understanding of the Old Testament, its literary background and significance for western civilization.

ENGL 2250 Literature of the New Testament: 3 semester hours

A comprehensive understanding of the New Testament, its literary background and significance for western civilization.

ENGL 2330 Introduction to Poetry: 3 semester hours

A close study of poems, with special emphasis on the varieties of poetic form, and the means of interpretation and evaluation.

ENGL 2340 Introduction to Drama: 3 semester hours

A close study of major dramatic works in various modes, to introduce the student to the forms and techniques of dramatic literature.

ENGL 2350 Introduction to Fiction: 3 semester hours

A close study of major prose fiction, with particular attention to the varieties of fictional forms and techniques.

ENGL 2360 Hey, Have You Read ______?: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. This course satisfies the core curriculum requirement for the literature in English area. It introduces students to approaches to reading literature in the 21st century. The course can focus on a specialty area, such as a genre, time period, or nationality, or on a theme transcending several specialty areas. Students will learn to read closely and begin to look at literature through various theoretical or cultural lenses.

ENGL 2370 Drama: The Greatest Hits: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. This course satisfies the core curriculum requirement for the literature in English area. It studies some of history’s most famous dramas both as literary forms and as cultural expressions. Plays will therefore be considered for themselves—for their genre, structure, and language—as well as for their social function, in an effort to better understand the complex communal values, settings, and crises which produced them. Students will read and discuss a wide variety of well-known plays from ancient Greece and Rome, the early modern English stage, and modern and contemporary culture.

ENGL 2400 Rhetorical Ways with Words: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. This course focuses on the diverse purposes and uses of language and writing, encouraging students to consider their functions beyond solely academic and literary realms. Specifically, students will investigate how language and writing are connected to identity, power, community, and knowledge creation. To accomplish these broad goals, students will read critical scholarship from a variety of related disciplines. They may practice field-specific methods of inquiry and/or investigate local, regional, individual rhetorical and language practices and engage in print and/or multimodal composition. This course satisfies the core curriculum requirement for the Language and Writing Studies area.

ENGL 2410 Literate Lives: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. This course raises definitional and exploratory questions: What is literacy? How does it change across time? Who has access to it? How can literacy both empower and marginalize people? To explore these complex questions, students will investigate the ways in which contemporary practices of literacy—reading, writing, listening, speaking, digital composing, and critical thinking—function in the lives of individuals, communities, and cultures. Students will interrogate current definitions of literacy, study scholarship about literacy, explore literacy myths, and reflect on how their own literate lives have been shaped. They may engage in field work and interact with local literacy communities. This course satisfies the core curriculum requirement for the Language and Writing Studies area.

ENGL 2810 Traditional Grammar: 3 semester hours

An introduction to the terms and concepts of traditional grammar, beginning with functions of the noun and forms of the verb in simple sentences, moving to more complex structures such as subordinate clauses and verbal phrases, and ending with the application of this material to issues of Standard English.

ENGL 2830 Introduction to English Language Variety: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. This course introduces students to the intersections of language and culture, including some of the many dialects of English. Students will learn why people from different cultural groups and regions use different versions of English, how they define themselves based on vocabulary, accent, and phrasing, and how these aspects of language change over time. Topics include variation in accents, morphosyntactic variation (grammar), lexical variation, and the social dimensions of language variation. This course satisfies the core curriculum requirement for the Language and Writing Studies area.

ENGL 3030 Improving on the Blank Page: Writing Poetry: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ENGL 1100 or the equivalent or consent of instructor. This course digs into questions of form and technique in poetry. Students will study and practice form, prosody, figurative language, and other techniques for (to borrow from Chilean poet Nicanor Parra) improving on the blank page. This course may be repeated once for a total of 6 credit hours. It counts toward the Certificate in Creative Writing.

ENGL 3040 Lying to Tell a Truth: Writing Fiction: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ENGL 2040 or ENGL 2060 or the equivalent or consent of instructor. This course examines and provides examples of characterization, dialogue, point-of-view, distance, weight, plot, setting, and more. Students will read published short stories, and discuss the idea of writing as discovery and exploration, that writers work out of curiosity and bewilderment and tell lies to arrive at a truth.

ENGL 3090 Turning the Kaleidoscope: How We Look at Texts: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent and 56 credit hours. This course introduces the use of literary theory in reading and writing about literary texts. Students learn and practice conventions of writing in English studies, basic literary research, and MLA documentation. Strongly recommended for English majors specializing in literature or anticipating graduate study in English. May not be taken on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Counts towards the Certificate in Writing.

ENGL 3100 Junior-Level Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent (3-6 credit hours) and 56 credit hours. Focuses on writing and literacies in various contexts. Builds on intellectual maturity, knowledge, and abilities gained through prior university studies. Enhances analytical, communicative, persuasive, and explanatory capabilities. Includes complex readings and research. Fulfills the university's requirement for a junior-level course in Communicative Skills. Counts toward the Certificate in Writing. May not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

ENGL 3110 Junior-Level Writing for International Students: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1110 or equivalent (3-6 credit hours) and 56 credit hours. This course, designed for any student whose first language is not English, enhances analytical, communicative, persuasive, and explanatory capabilities in contemporary American English. It emphasizes academic reading, writing, research, and documentation. It fulfills the university's junior-level writing requirement and counts toward the Certificate in Writing.

ENGL 3120 Business Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent (3-6 hours) and junior standing. This course further develops the experienced writer's style and analytical capabilities to the level of sophistication necessary for upper-division writing assignments and for business and professional settings. Writing assignments may include business correspondence, reports, resumes, proposals, analyses, feasibility studies, and articles for in-house publications. The course emphasizes clarity, consciseness, organization, format, style, tone and mechanical correctness; expands upon students' research and documentation skills; and requires research in university libraries. Fulfills the University's requirement for a junior-level course in communicative skills. It may not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

ENGL 3130 Technical Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ENGL 1100 or equivalent (3-6 hours) and junior standing. The major elements of industrial technical writing. Writing assignments include technical definitions, abstracts and summaries, mechanism descriptions, instructions, process analyses, technical reports and proposals. Emphasis is placed on clarity , conciseness, organization, format, style and tone. The course includes an introduction to research methods and documentation. All readings are selected from industrial material. Fulfills the University requirement for junior-level course in communicative skills, subject to the approval of the student's major department. May not be taken on the satisfactory/unsatisfactory option.

ENGL 3150 Feature Writing: 3 semester hours

Same as MEDIA ST 3150. Prerequisite: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. Study of freelance and staff-written magazine or newspaper feature articles. Emphasis on relationship between types of publication and article content, research methods, and writing style. Frequent short assignments -- journal entries, interviews, library projects, article critiques, and market reports -- lead to production of full-length feature articles. May not be taken on the S/U option. The course counts toward the Certificate in Writing.

ENGL 3160 Writing in the Sciences: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent (3-6 hours) and 56 credit hours. This course is designed to teach students how to write effectively in the sciences. Writing assignments include short reports, proposals and a major project; projects may include a research or analytical report, a formal proposal or a procedures/instructions manual. The course includes an introduction to research methods and documentation. This course fulfills the University's junior-level writing requirement and may not be taken on the satisfactory/unsatisfactory option.

ENGL 3180 Reporting: 3 semester hours

Same as MEDIA ST 3180. Prerequisite: ENGL 3140 or equivalent. Theory and practice of reporting news for publication in the print media. Includes one classroom session and one field assignment weekly. Stories must be filed within deadline limits. Writing emphasis is on clarity, conciseness, and accuracy. The course counts toward the certificate in writing.

ENGL 3200 Composing Disability: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. This course offers students an understanding of disability as a complex and crucial part of the world and human experience. Students will approach disability as a matter of identity, language, writing, power, education, politics, literature, art, and more. More specifically, they will read disability studies critical theory, literary works, and personal narratives; create accessible multimodal projects; engage in scholarly and/or community-based research; and candidly discuss assumptions about disability. Through this work, students will assess the value and effect of different ways of thinking about disability and understand the core concepts of disability studies and its emergence as a field.

ENGL 3201 Narratives from the Forever Wars: 3 semester hours

Same as MEDIA ST 3201 and MVS 3201. This course studies literature and film written by and about those who served in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, with particular interest in how veterans as individuals are represented in it.

ENGL 3280 Public Relations Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ENGL 3100 or equivalent. An introduction to the process of planning, producing, and evaluating written public relations messages. Writing assignments includemedia releases. letters, memos, position papers, background papers, brochures, and reports and proposals.

ENGL 3310 English Literature Before 1790 (MOTR LITR 102): 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. This course examines the development of English literature from the Middle Ages through the eighteenth century. Students will be introduced to major literary movements and themes through the reading and analysis of representative works of selected major authors. This course fulfills the British Literature requirement for the major.

ENGL 3320 British Literature in the Long 19th Century (MOTR LITR 102): 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. This course meets the requirement for one 3000 level course in British literature. It surveys the arc of British literature from about 1790 into the early 20th century: the Romantic, Victorian, and Modernist eras.

ENGL 3330 Reformers, Revolutionaries, and Romantics in the British Romantic Era: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. Students read poetry and prose by several major writers of the British Romantic period. This course meets the requirement for one 3000 level course in British literature.

ENGL 3340 Full Speed Ahead! Literature in the Dizzying Victorian Era: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. Students read poetry, essays, and fiction by major writers from the Victorian era of British literature. This course meets the requirement for one 3000 level course in British literature.

ENGL 3350 Slouching Toward Chaos: the Early 20th Century in British Literature: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. Students read poetry, drama, and fiction by major writers of the Modernist era of British literature. This course meets the requirement for one 3000 level course in British literature.

ENGL 3500 Special Studies: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisite: A course in area of proposed work and consent of instructor. Individual work, with conferences adjusted to needs of the student. May not be used to meet specific English department distribution and language requirements. May be repeated for a maximum total of four hours credit.

ENGL 3510 World Literature Before 1650 (MOTR LITR 200): 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ENGL 1100. This course surveys World Literature from the earliest times to 1650. Students will examine diverse literary works in a variety of genres and voices. The course will include literary works from diverse traditions throughout the world, excluding literature from the United States and England.

ENGL 3520 World Literature After 1650 (MOTR LITR 200): 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100. This course surveys World Literature from 1650 to the present. Students will examine diverse literary works in a variety of genres and voices. The course will include literary works from diverse traditions from throughout the world.

ENGL 3530 Contemporary World Literature: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. This course covers selected World Literature from the 20th and 21st centuries with emphasis on non-European literatures. This course may include works from Europe, Latin American, the Middle East, Africa, and Asia; it excludes literature from the United States and England.

ENGL 3710 American Literature Before 1865 (MOTR LITR 101): 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. This course features representative selections from American authors from the early seventeenth century to the Civil War. This course fulfills the American Literature requirement for the major.

ENGL 3720 American Literature After 1865 (MOTR LITR 101): 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent. This course examines dramatic upheavals in society that have engendered continuous innovation in American literature since 1865. It will look closely at a variety of individual authors motivated by these artistic, cultural, political, and psychological disturbances; we will also pay close attention to specific literary movements, from Naturalism to Transrealism, energized by these societal changes. This course fulfills the American Literature requirement for the major.

ENGL 3800 Topics in Women and Literature (MOTR LITR 106): 3 semester hours

An examination of the role of women in literature, either as figures in literary works or as writers. Specific topics to vary from semester to semester. Since the topics of ENGL 3800 may change each semester, the course may be repeated for credit if the topics are substantially different.

ENGL 4030 Contemporary Critical Theory: 3 semester hours

This course is to acquaint students with a range of critical methodologies that have gained currency since the 1960's; topics may include formalist, structuralist, post-structuralist, Marxist, reader-response, psychoanalytic, feminist, cognitive, and evolutionary approaches to literature and culture.

ENGL 4060 Adolescent Literature: 3 semester hours

The course will expose students to the large variety of quality adolescent literature available for reading and study in middle and high school classes. It will also examine the relevance of a variety of issues to the reading and teaching of adolescent literature, among them: reader response; theory and practice; multi-culturalism; literacy; the relation of adolescent literature to "classic" literature the role of adolescent literature in interdisciplinary studies; adolescent literature as an incentive to extracurricular reading.

ENGL 4080 Narrative, Cognition, and Emotion: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 2320; ENGL 3090, prerequisite or co-requisite. Examines narrative theory in the light of recent research into cognitive organization and the structure of the emotions. Traditional and contemporary theories of narrative--or realism, symbolism, point of view, tone, and genre--are developed through recent findings in empirical science. A variety of stories and novels are used as test cases for theoretical propositions.

ENGL 4130 A Machine Made of Words: Writing Your Best Poems: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent. This course examines in more detail the ways in which poets construct machines from words—that is, the way that the words of a poem provide its verbal, emotional, and intellectual energy. Through the examination and discussion of both contemporary published poetry and the work of students in the class, students will consider the question: how do poems use language to make sense of (or to defamiliarize) the world and our experience of it? The course counts toward the Certificate in Writing.

ENGL 4140 Polishing Your Stories: Producing a Publishable Short Story: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent. This course gives student writers tools and practice in re-thinking and rewriting their stories. It is for students who are serious about writing stories that can be published in litmag, Bellerive, or other journals. Students will produce drafts for workshop critique and will rewrite them producing at least one that is polished enough for publication. The course counts toward the certificate in Writing.

ENGL 4150 Creative Non-Fiction: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent. This course will examine the aesthetic and technical concerns of the writer of creative non-fiction. Students will read published essays and write their own to submit for workshop. This course counts toward the Certificate in Writing.

ENGL 4160 Special Topics in Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent. Special topics in writing that are not covered in other 4000level English courses. Since the topics of ENGL 4160 may change each semester, the course may be repeated for credit if the topics are substantially different.

ENGL 4180 Novel Beginnings: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent. This course teaches students to engage the reader when writing a Sci-fi / Fantasy / Thriller / Young Adult / Literary novel. Students will work on getting the balance right, on creating a compelling event, dimensional characters, an engaging plot, a setting that feels real, and a point-of-view strategy. Students learn about key ingredients that make a novel beginning interesting to a reader and present their novel beginnings in a workshop format for revision.

ENGL 4260 Chaucer: 3 semester hours

The course concentrates on the poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer, including the Canterbury Tales, early poetic works, and the Troilus and Criseyde. All readings are in the original Middle English.

ENGL 4270 Medieval English Literature: 3 semester hours

A survey of old and middle English literature from Beowulf to Malory's Morte d'Arthur, exclusive of Chaucer. All works are read in modern English translations.

ENGL 4320 Sixteenth-Century Poetry and Prose: 3 semester hours

A broad selection of writers from the late 15th century through 1603, including Thomas More, the Sidneys, Spenser, and Shakespeare's sonnets.

ENGL 4350 Milton: 3 semester hours

All the minor poems and the three longer poems with some attention to the major prose, Milton and his relation to the politics, theology and literature of the seventeenth century.

ENGL 4360 Shakespeare's Friends and Rivals: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor. This course studies the professional London stage from the 1580s to the 1620s with particular emphasis on the drama of Shakespeare’s contemporaries. Though Shakespeare will not be the focus in this course, connections with his works will be discussed. Students will learn the conventions of dramatic genres and how to situate plays in their historical, cultural, and literary contexts. They will also explore how playwrights responded to the theater market in which they exhibited their dramatic wares and the extent to which they saw one another as rivals or collaborators.

ENGL 4370 Shakespeare: Tragedies and Romances: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor. This course explores Shakespeare’s tragedies and romances, with particular attention to their genre as well as their relation to the cultural issues of Shakespeare’s time. Students will learn to see Shakespeare as a dramatic craftsman and explore the question of his contribution to English literature: whether he saw himself as an innovator or inheritor of well-known stories from the classical tradition, Britain’s chronicle histories, scripture, and legend. Shakespeare’s narrative poems as well as modern film adaptations may also be featured.

ENGL 4380 Shakespeare: Comedies and Histories: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor. This course explores Shakespeare’s comedies and histories, with particular attention to their genre as well as their relation to the cultural issues of Shakespeare’s time, above all the place of women and the importance of marriage and male friendship. Students will learn how Shakespeare’s plays explore the rights of citizens and perhaps challenge accepted notions of political power. Students will also uncover Shakespeare’s debt to ancient and contemporary forms of comedy as well as his innovative contributions to that dramatic form. The sonnets as well as modern film adaptations may also be brought into the discussion of these questions.

ENGL 4450 The Eighteenth-Century English Novel: 3 semester hours

The origins and early development of the English novel, from Defoe to Jane Austen.

ENGL 4540 The Nineteenth-Century English Novel: 3 semester hours

Novels of the Romantic and Victorian periods, from Austen to George Eliot.

ENGL 4550 Novels into Films: The Nineteenth Century: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3090, ENGL 3320. Novels by Austen, Eliot, Wilde, Hardy, and others read in themselves and as interpreted in film. Comparisons of the representational and aesthetic techniques available to novels and film.

ENGL 4580 Literature of the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries: 3 semester hours

Literature of the period between 1870 and the First World War, including works by writers such as Hardy, Conrad, James, Wilde, Stevenson, Shaw, Jefferies, and Wells.

ENGL 4610 Selected Major American Writers I: 3 semester hours

American literature of the nineteenth century: Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman and others.

ENGL 4620 Selected Major American Writers II: 3 semester hours

American literature of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries: Dickinson, James, Twain, Cather, Frost, Dreiser and others.

ENGL 4640 American Fiction to World War I: 3 semester hours

Development of the novel and short story in America.

ENGL 4650 Modern American Fiction: 3 semester hours

The novel and short story in America since World War I. There may be some attention to British and continental influences.

ENGL 4740 Poetry Since World War II: 3 semester hours

Reading and analysis of contemporary poetry.

ENGL 4750 Modern British Fiction: 3 semester hours

Critical reading and analysis of British fiction of the twentieth century. There may be some attention to American and continental influences.

ENGL 4770 Modern Poetry: 3 semester hours

Critical reading and analysis of poetry of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Yeats, Eliot, Frost, Williams and others.

ENGL 4790 Rhetoric and Social Justice: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent. This course introduces students to rhetoric as integral to language, communication, and meaning-making. Students will read rhetorical history and contemporary scholarship and theory; apply theories to various scenarios and artifacts; and become more thoughtful practitioners of rhetoric in their own lives. Specifically, the course introduces rhetoric through the lens of social justice, offering students an opportunity to use rhetorical theories and methods to better understand current social events, activist movements, practices of civic engagement, and corresponding media representations.

ENGL 4800 Introduction to English Linguistics: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent. This course presents a survey of linguistics with emphasis on what the field reveals about the English language. Topics include the sounds of language, grammar, writing systems, language acquisition, language in society, language history, dialects, and usage.

ENGL 4810 Descriptive English Grammar: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent; ENGL 2810 or passing grade on English-Education Test of Basic Grammar. This course presents a descriptive study of modern English morphology and syntax (grammar) from the perspectives of traditional, structural, and transformational grammar.

ENGL 4820 History of the English Language: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent. A historical survey of the English language from its IndoEuropean roots through Old and Middle English to the present. Topics include changes in sound, meaning, and grammar, as well as developments in American English, including regional and social dialects.

ENGL 4830 Sociolinguistics: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent. This course presents a survey of topics in sociolinguistics, with some emphasis on language variation in English. The course offers both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Topics may include social dialectology, variationist sociolinguistics, third-wave sociolinguistics, ethnography of communication, language in schools, language and ethnicity, language and gender, and language and sexuality.

ENGL 4850 Topics in the Teaching of Writing: 1-3 semester hours

Same as TCH ED 5850. Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent. Special topics in the practice of and pedagody of writing designed for in-service teachers. Topics may include writing at specific grade levels, writing/reading workshops, writing in urban settings, writing across the curriculum, action research, new technology, classroom and district-level assessment. May be repeated once for credit if topics differ. Counts toward Certificate in Writing.

ENGL 4860 Editing and the Production Process: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent; ENGL 2810 or ENGL 4810. This course provides students an opportunity to perform professional-level copyediting and proofreading, navigate several industry-standard publishing style manuals, understand the basic stages of the book production process and editorial roles at various stages during that process, and recognize and question trends in the practice and execution (media, format) of copyediting. This course counts toward the Professional, Creative, and Technical Writing Certificates.

ENGL 4864 Technical Editing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent (3-6 hours) and junior standing. This course covers the principles and practices of technical editing, including usability, audience analysis, contextual editing, the conventions of scientific and technical communication, and the role of the editor in document development and publication. Students will also learn standard practices of copy editing and the use of style guides.

ENGL 4865 Content Strategy: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent (3-6 hours) and junior standing. This course examines the practice of technical communication in content management system (CMS) environments and covers such subjects as single sourcing, topic-based writing, and adaptive content. Students will learn how to perform a content audit, engage in content modeling, create content templates, and use Framemaker or a similar tool to structure content.

ENGL 4866 Help Authoring: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent (3-6 hours) and junior standing. This course addresses the technological and rhetorical skills necessary for creating effective online help systems, including context-sensitive help for computer applications.

ENGL 4867 Proposal Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent (3-6 hours) and junior standing. This course familiarizes students with many aspects of writing proposals for various purposes in academic, professional, and public spheres. It offers students opportunities to write documents to promote their academic, professional, or personal goals or those of their organization(s).

ENGL 4869 Usability Studies: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent (3-6 hours) and junior standing. This course addresses the methods used by technical communicators to evaluate usability. It focuses on methods used to evaluate human interaction with communication tools and students will learn how to make products more suitable for human use.

ENGL 4870 Advanced Business and Technical Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or its equivalent as judged by the instructor. An advanced, project-oriented course to produce substantial, multifaceted business and technical writing projects. These might include reports, manuals, proposals, Web projects, computer documentation, or other advanced written assignments. These projects demonstrate the ability to handle complex assignments requiring initiative, independent work, and professional-level writing skills.

ENGL 4871 Publishing: Writers, Editors, and Readers: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3120, ENGL 3130; or equivalent. Students will explore how the technological revolution has changed the way writers write, editors edit, and readers read. Topics covered will include the social and political implications of these technological advances in book, magazine, and online publishing. We will discuss how the roles of editors and writers have changed. Students will develop a semester writing or editing project that emerges out of this exploration. This course is for writers interested in having their work published and for anyone interested in working in the publishing field. This course counts toward the Professional, Creative, and Technical Writing Certificates.

ENGL 4872 Technical Presentations: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3120, ENGL 3130, or equivalent. Students learn about different kinds of presentations given in professional contexts and the technologies used to produce them. They will learn to create powerful presentations that make memorable presentations. The course is asynchronous and 100% online, and is designed for graduate students preparing papers for conferences, and for technical and business professionals presenting to their bosses, colleagues, and clients. This course counts toward the Professional and Technical Writing Certificate.

ENGL 4874 International Dimensions of Technical Communication: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent (3-6 hours) and junior standing. This course examines complexities of communication of technical information worldwide. It includes topics such as graphics, icons, symbols; user interface design; intercultural communication.

ENGL 4876 Research Methods in Technical Communication: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent (3-6 hours) and junior standing. This course addresses essential research methods in technical communication, including audience analysis, interviewing techniques, working with subject matter experts, and experimental research design.

ENGL 4877 Writing in Social Media: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 1100 or equivalent (3-6 hours) and junior standing. This course will address theory and practice of communication through social media. It will emphasize the role of social media in industry.

ENGL 4880 Writing for Teachers: 3 semester hours

Same as SEC ED 4880. Prerequisite: ENGL 3090 or junior level English. Writing for Teachers is an English-education course that supports writing across the curriculum for both pre-service English and content area teachers. Teacher candidates learn writing theories and literacy strategies to help their future students construct meaning from their discipline. The course works best for those who are completing level II or beginning level III education courses. The course counts toward the Certificate in Writing.

ENGL 4890 Writing Internship: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or its equivalent as judged by the instructor. Course limited to students who are completing certificates in writing. May be taken concurrently with the final course in the certificate sequence. Students work in a supervised internship to complete professional writing assignments. Special consent form required.

ENGL 4892 Independent Writing Project: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent as judged by instructor. Course limited to students who are completing their certificates in writing. May be taken concurrently with the final course in the certificate sequence. Students work individually with an instructor to complete an extensive creative writing or critical analysis writing project. This course is available on a limited basis only with the approval of the Coordinator and faculty sponsor. Special consent form is required.

ENGL 4895 Editing "Litmag: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: ENGL 3100 or equivalent and at least two creative writing courses. Course is primarily for students nearing the end of their certificates in writing. Students in this course create "Litmag", the UM-St. Louis student literary magazine. Students will call for submissions; they will read and select work to be published; and they will produce the magazine, dealing with issues like format, budget, proofreading, print run, advertising, distribution, and publicity. The course is offered only in the spring and culminates with the publication of "Litmag" in late April.

ENGL 4925 The Short Story in World Literature: 3 semester hours

Students will read a wide variety of short fiction, from very brief pieces to novellas, including stories from all over the world and from several different centuries either in translation or in the original English. The course will also cover short theoretical works on narrative and critical commentaries on some of the fiction.

ENGL 4930 Studies in Gender and Literature: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 4930. The course examines the role of gender in literature, including the transformation of literary genres by women writers, writings by women during a particular historical period, and gender relations in literature. Specific topics vary from semester to semester. The course may be repeated for credit with departmental approval.

ENGL 4932 Female Gothic: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 4932. The course examines the historical development of the female gothic, a genre which employs narrative strategies for expressing fears and desires associated with female experience. From the late 18th century to the present, we will trace the persistence of the Gothic vision in fiction and film.

ENGL 4950 Special Topics In Literature: 3 semester hours

Special topics in literature that are not covered in other 4000-level English courses. Since the topics of ENGL 4950 may change each semester, the course may be repeated for credit if the topics are substantially different.

ENGL 5000 Introduction to Graduate Study in English: 3 semester hours

A course designed to prepare students for the professional study of English. The course will both familiarize students with basic bibliographic tools and scholarly methods and introduce them to issues that are of current critical interest to those engaged in the advanced study of literature. These issues include gender, textuality, reader-response, multiculturalism, feminism, psychoanalysis, cultural studies, literary history and the relationship of literature to philosophy, history, and science. Must be taken within the first twelve hours of graduate study.

ENGL 5100 Graduate Workshop in Poetry: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Open to students in the creative writing program and to others with permission of instructor. Consists of a writing workshop in which the poetry written by the students enrolled in the course is discussed and analyzed by the intructor and members of the class. Students taking this course will be expected to write original poetry throughout the course. May be repeated for maximim graduate credit of fifteen (15) hours.

ENGL 5110 Graduate Workshop in Fiction: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Open to students in the creative writing program and to others with permission of instructor. Consists of a writing workshop in which the fiction (short stories or chapters of a novel) written by the students enrolled in the course is discussed and analyzed by the instructor and members of the class. Students taking this course will be expected to write original fiction thoughout the course. May be repeated for maximum graduate credit of fifteen (15) hours.

ENGL 5170 Techniques, Methods, and Effects in Fiction Writing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Open to students in the MFA program and to others with consent of the instructor. This course analyzes the technical choices made by important contemporary fiction writers in the areas of point of view, tone, setting, form, and plot structure, and it examines the effects of those choices. Close consideration is given to fictional techniques that contribute to a story's characterization, tension, interest, reliability, drama, irony, and humor. The course is primarily for creative writers.

ENGL 5180 Form and Theory of Poetry: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Open to students in the MFA Program and other graduate students with consent of instructor. This course explores various aspects of traditional and contemporary poetry. The student will gain an understanding of formal poetry-rhyme and meter-as well as of traditional types of poetry, for example, the lyric and the narrative. Throughout the course, an emphasis will be maintained on free verse and a greater understanding of its practice. Students will read selectvely in the poetry, theory, and critical approaches of various periods, for example, the romantic and the modern, and within various movements, such as the symbolist or confessional.

ENGL 5190 Literary Journal Editing: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Open to students in the MFA program who have had at least two graduate writing workshops and to others with consent of the instructor. In this course students serve as the first readers of all submissions to the university's literary magazine, Natural Bridge. Students will read and evaluate poems, short stories, and essays and recommend a body of work to the editorial board of the magazine. The editorial board will then consider the class consensus in its final selection of material for publication. In addition to this primary task of editorial selection, students will also be involved in the productions of an issue of the magazine. May be repeated for maximum graduate credit of nine hours.

ENGL 5200 MFA Readings: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Open to students in the MFA program and to others with consent of the instructor. This is an independent reading course. In consultation with an MFA faculty member, students choose works from the MFA Reading List and read them with the goal of broadening and sharpening their technical skills as writers. Students ordinarily choose works in one genre: poetry, the short story, or the novel. Each week the student reads and reports on at least one work. The course may be taken only once.

ENGL 5250 Studies in Middle English Literature: 3 semester hours

Special topics in English literature before 1500.

ENGL 5300 Renaissance Literature: 3 semester hours

Special topics in English literature from 1500 to 1660.

ENGL 5400 Eighteenth Century Literature: 3 semester hours

Studies in Augustan poetry and prose, including drama and fiction, with emphasis on background and major figures.

ENGL 5500 Nineteenth Century Literature: 3 semester hours

Special topics in English romanticism, in Victorian life and thought, and in the development of the novel and of poetry between 1797 and 1914.

ENGL 5600 American Literature Before 1900: 3 semester hours

Selected American writers or topics from the colonial period to 1900.

ENGL 5700 Twentieth-Century American Literature: 3 semester hours

Selected American writers or topics from 1900 to the present.

ENGL 5750 Twentieth-Century British Literature: 3 semester hours

Selected British and Commonwealth writers of the twentieth century.

ENGL 5800 Modern Linguistics: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: A study of selected topics in the structure of the English language, combining readings in current linguistics publications with original research.

ENGL 5840 Theories of Writing: 3 semester hours

An analysis of major modern theories in composition.

ENGL 5850 Studies in Composition: 3 semester hours

The study of special topics in composition. Topics may include history of composition, psychology of writing, reader response theory, etc.

ENGL 5860 Writing/Reading Theory: 3 semester hours

This course studies the parallel evolution of reading and writing theory and pedagogy. Topics include the influence of psycholinguistics and reader-response theory and the link between reading and writing theory and instruction.

ENGL 5870 Composition Research: 3 semester hours

This course equips students both to analyze and conduct research in composition. Coursework will teach students to evaluate methodologies and implications, to analyze data, and to design their own research projects.

ENGL 5880 Writing in the Content Areas: 3 semester hours

Same as TCH ED 5880. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. This course emphasizes the importance of integrating writing instruction in classrooms across subject areas. Theories of writing and writing instruction will be explored, and students will discuss how to put the theories into practice in their classrooms. Students will learn to explore their own writing process while learning strategies that will help them to teach writing rather than just assign writing. The course examines the tools pre-service and in-service teachers will need to work with diverse learning communities, to utilize best practice in the teaching of writing, and to use writing as a tool for student learning in any content area. Students in this class will be held to professional writing and speaking standards. The course counts toward the Certificate in Writing.

ENGL 5890 Teaching College Writing: 3 semester hours

This course provides the opportunity for practical application of composition theory with an emphasis on improving teaching skills. Strongly recommended for graduate teaching assistants.

ENGL 5910 Studies In Poetry: 3 semester hours

Study of a few selected British and American poets.

ENGL 5920 Studies in Fiction: 3 semester hours

Study of a few selected British and American novelists and short story writers.

ENGL 5940 Seminar in Gender and Literature: 3 semester hours

Same as GS 5940. Gender studies in literature of different periods, types, and genres; satisfies area requirement (1-6) appropriate to its period, national literature, and genre.

ENGL 5950 Seminar in Special Topics: 1-3 semester hours

Special topics which are not covered in other graduate-level English courses.

ENGL 5970 Independent Reading: 1-3 semester hours

Directed study in areas of English for which courses are not available.

ENGL 6000 Thesis: 1-6 semester hours

Prerequisite: 3.5 graduate GPA. Thesis research and writing on a selected topic in English studies. May be taken over two semesters, three (3) hours each semester.

ENGL 6880 Gateway Writing Project: 6 semester hours

Same as TCH ED 6880. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. An intensive course in the writing process and the writing curriculum, designed for experienced teachers. Readings of current theory and research will be related to participants' experience as writers and as teachers. May be repeated for credit, but no more than 6 hours may be applied toward the M.Ed. Counts toward the Graduate Certificate in Teaching Writing.

ENGL 6890 Seminar in Professional Writing for Teachers: 3 semester hours

Same as TCH ED 6890. Prerequisites: TCH ED 6880 and consent of instructor. Capstone seminar for the Graduate Certificate in the Teaching of Writing. Participants will pursue the dual role of writer/ writing teacher by designing individual projects with one of these emphases: (1) research writing based on a classroom inquiry into the teaching of writing; (2) expository and creative writing based on an inquiry into the teacher's own evolution as a writer.

Frank Grady
Professor and Chair
Ph.D., University of California-Berkeley

Joseph Carroll
Curators' Professor
Ph.D., University of California-Berkeley

Eamonn Wall
Jefferson Smurfit Professor of Irish Studies
Ph.D., City University of New York

Mary Troy
Professor
M.F.A., University of Arkansas

John Dalton
Associate Professor
M.F.A., University of Iowa

Suellynn Duffey
Associate Professor
Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Steven Schreiner
Associate Professor
Ph.D., Wayne State University

Scott Peterson
Associate Professor
Ph.D, University of Maine

Kurt Schreyer
Associate Professor
Ph.D, University of Pennsylvania

Shane Seely
Associate Professor
Ph.D, Syracuse University

Benjamin Torbert
Associate Professor
Ph.D., Duke University

Lauren Obermark
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., Ohio State

William Klein
Teaching Professor
Ph.D., Michigan Technological University

Barbara Van Voorden
Teaching Professor
M.A., Washington University

Thomas Glen Irwin
Associate Teaching Professor
M.A., University of Missouri-St. Louis

Deborah Maltby
Associate Teaching Professor
Ph.D., University of Missouri - Kansas City

Thomas Scott McKelvie
Associate Teaching Professor
M.A., University of Missouri-St. Louis

Lynn Staley
Associate Teaching Professor
Ph.D., St. Louis University

Drucilla Wall
Associate Teaching Professor
Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Jenna Alexander
Assistant Teaching Professor
M.A., University of Missouri-St. Louis

Jeannie Allison
Assistant Teaching Professor
M.A., University of Missouri - St. Louis

Paula Coalier
Assistant Teaching Professor
M.A., University of Missouri - St. Louis

Matthew Kimbrell
Assistant Teaching Professor
M.A., University of Missouri-St. Louis

Christopher Schott
Assistant Teaching Professor
Ed.D, University of Missouri-St. Louis

Kathryne Dwiggins Watt
Assistant Teaching Professor
M.F.A., University of Missouri - St. Louis

Sally Barr Ebest
Founders Professor
Ph.D. , Indiana University

Peter Wolfe
Curators' Professor Emeritus
Ph.D. , University of Wisconsin

Sylvia Cook
Professors Emeriti
Ph.D., University of Michigan

Jane Zeni
Professors Emeriti
Ed.D., University of Missouri-St. Louis

David Carkeet
Professors Emeriti
Ph.D, Indiana University

Richard M. Cook
Professors Emeriti
Ph.D., University of Michigan

Howard Schwartz
Professors Emeriti
M.A., Washington University

Deborah Aldrich-Watson
Associate Professor Emerita
Ph.D, Columbia University

Kathy Gentile
Associate Professor Emerita
Ph.D., University of Oregon

Nanora Sweet
Associate Professor Emerita
Ph.D., University of Michigan

Jane Williamson
Associate Professor Emerita
Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College

Bruce L. Liles
Associate Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., Stanford University

Jennifer MacKenzie
Teaching Professor Emerita
M.A., Purdue University

William Mayhan
Teaching Professor Emeritus
Ph.D, Washington University

David Rota
Teaching Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Ellie Chapman
Senior Lecturer Emerita
M.A., Murray State University

Judy Gurley
Senior Lecturer Emerita
M.A., University of Arkansas

Judith Linville
Senior Lecturer Emerita
M.A., University of Arkansas

Terence Martin
Senior Lecturer Emeritus
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University-Carbondale