The university offers a number of interdisciplinary programs and courses. These programs combine course offerings from several departments so the subject is examined from a multidisciplinary approach. While most persons who earn certificates do so in the process of completing their undergraduate degree, non-degree seeking students may complete a certificate. Below are descriptions of these interdisciplinary offerings:

  • Bachelor of Liberal Studies degree
  • Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies degree
  • Interdisciplinary undergraduate certificates
  • Interdisciplinary minors
  • Interdisciplinary courses

Interdisciplinary certificates for international or areas studies are housed in the Center for International Studies.

Bachelor of Liberal Studies (BLS)

The Bachelor of Liberal Studies is a degree program that enables students to combine structured areas of academic emphasis in ways more relevant to their interests than the standard academic major.

Students who participate in this program must declare their areas of study (two minors or a minor and undergraduate certificate) at the time they declare that BLS is their intended degree. The plan of study must be approved at the beginning of the program.

The BLS program is administered through the Department of Philosophy.

To obtain a Bachelor of Liberal Studies (BLS), a student must complete:

  • UMSL General Education Requirements (consult General Education section of course listings)
  • In addition, students must complete the State Requirement (3) and Cultural Diversity Requirement (3) if not met in General Education course selection
  • The university requirement of proficiency in English Composition
    • ENGL 1100 - First Year Writing (to be completed in the first 24 credit hours at the university)
    • Junior Level Writing
  • The university requirement of proficiency in Mathematics (to be completed in first 24 credit hours at the university)
  • A Liberal Studies Concentration to consist of two designated BLS Minors in participating departments or other units  or
  • A designated minor and any undergraduate certificate. No course may be used more than once.
  • A capstone course1 (minimum of 3 hours) selected from one of the concentration areas that make up the identified BLS core.

Also Required

  • Minimum of 45 credit hours in upper level course work (2000 or higher)
    • Electives 28-42
    • A minimum of 120 credit hours
    • Overall GPA of 2.0 or better
    • GPA of 2.0 or better in BLS combination areas (unless otherwise specified)
    • Minimum grade of C in all courses used in BLS combination areas
    • Residency requirement, in addition to campus residency, unless otherwise specified, 9 graded hours in each minor and certificate at 2000 level or above and one capstone course
1

Note: Not all minors have a designated BLS capstone course so students must be careful to pair minors and certificates so that they have a capstone course.

The Colleges of Arts and Sciences (CAS), Business Administration (COBA), College of Education (COE), the Pierre Laclede Honors College (PLHC), and the School of Social Work (SW) have joined together to make available Liberal Studies combinations involving the following units:

  • Department of Anthropology and Archaeology (CAS)
  • Department of Art and Art History (CAS)
  • Department of Biology (CAS)
  • College of Business Administration (COBA)
  • College of Education (COE)
  • Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (CAS)
  • Department of Communication and Media (CAS)
  • Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice (CAS)
  • Department of Economics (CAS)
  • Department of English (CAS)
  • Department of History (CAS)
  • Pierre Laclede Honors College (PLHC)1
  • Department of Language and Cultural Studies (CAS)

  • Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (CAS)
  • Department of Music (CAS)
  • Department of Philosophy (CAS)
  • Department of Physics and Astronomy (CAS)
  • Department of Political Science (CAS)
  • Department of Psychological Sciences (CAS)
  • Department of Sociology, Gerontology and Gender Studies (CAS)
  • Department of Theatre Arts (CAS)
  • School of Social Work (SW)
  • Undergraduate certificates
1

Must be admitted to Honors program.

Bachelor of Liberal Studies: Capstone and Other Restrictions

  1. Students who are planning to earn a Bachelor of Liberal Studies degree should declare the BLS as their major within the first 90 hours of the program. Declaration past this time may prevent timely graduation as all capstone courses are not available every semester.
  2. The College of Nursing and the Joint Engineering Program are not participants in the BLS program.
  3. The following Colleges/Departments participate in the BLS program but do not offer a capstone course and must be paired with a minor from one of the areas listed below: Business, Studio Art, Theater Arts, Statistics, Undergraduate Certificates, and Interdisciplinary minors.
  4. Students admitted to the Pierre Laclede Honors College who wish to present the Honors Certificate as a minor for the BLS must complete the Honors Capstone, (one or two credit hours) and also direct three to six hours of their Honors independent study requirement to work demonstrably relevant to their BLS program. Students should consult the BLS faculty advisor in the Honors College about this requirement.
  5. The capstone is required in addition to the courses presented for the minor. A minimum grade of C must be earned in the capstone course. The capstone course is not counted toward the minor residency requirement.
  6. Students choosing to combine the minor in History of Science and Technology with a minor in the Philosophy of Science and Technology may use the same course to satisfy the Logic and Methodology requirement for both minors and may select either PHIL 4491 or HIST 4999 as the capstone. However students selecting HIST 4999 must have also taken HIST 2999.
  7. The following have identified a Capstone, so at least one of these minors must be included in the BLS program:
     
    Anthropology
    One additional 4000 level course in Anthropology not used in the minor.3
    Art & Art History
    One additional 4000 level topics course in Art History not used in the minor.3
    Biology
    BIOL 4889Senior Seminar2
    Chemistry/Biochemistry
    3 total hours from the options listed:3
    Introduction to Chemical Literature
    Chemical Research
    Seminar
    Communication
    One additional 3000/4000 level Communication course not used in the minor.3
    Criminology & Criminal Justice
    One additional 4000 level course in Criminology and Criminal Justice, not used as part of the minor.3
    Economics
    One additional 4000 level Economics course (except ECON 4105, ECON 4160, and ECON 4550) not used in the minor.3
    English
    One additional 4000 level English Literature course not used in the minor.3
    Gerontology
    One additional 4000 level course in Gerontology not used in the minor and to be coordinated with the program director for Gerontology before starting the course.3
    History
    HIST 4999Senior Seminar5
    Honors College 1
    3 total hours taken from the options listed:
    Independent Portfolio Writing
    Independent Study In Honors
    Independent Study: Internships
    Languages and Cultures
    FRENCH 3211Contemporary French Culture3
    JAPAN 3280Readings in Japanese3
    SPANISH 3210Hispanic Culture And Civilization: Spain3
    or SPANISH 3211 Hispanic Culture And Civilization: Spanish America
    Mathematics/Computer Science
    Computer Science: One additional 4000 Level Course in Computer Science not used in the minor.3
    Mathematics: One additional 4000 Level Course in Mathematics not in the minor.3
    Media Studies
    One additional 4000 level course not used in the minor.3
    Music
    Select one of the following:3
    Directed Studies
    Directed Studies: Variable Topic
    Directed Study: Variable Topic
    Directed Studies: Variable Topic
    Philosophy
    One additional 4000 level course not used in the minor.3
    Physics
    PHYSICS 4381Directed Readings In Physics3
    Political Science
    POL SCI 3950Senior Seminar In Political Science3
    Psychology
    One additional 4000 level Psychology course not used in the minor.3
    Sociology
    One additional 4000 level course in Sociology not used in the minor, excluding:3
    Special Study
    Internship In Sociology
1

Must be admitted to Honors program.

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (BIS)

The Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies degree (B.I.S.) provides a flexible, individualized program of study for the self-directed learner. It is developed by each student with advisement by UMSL professional advisers and faculty, and it is intended for students who have unique educational goals that cannot be met by any other UMSL degree program.

Oversight of the B.I.S. degree is the responsibility of the Interdisciplinary Studies Committee, composed of faculty and professional staff, including representatives from Arts and Sciences (Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences), Business, Education, Fine Arts and Communication, Nursing or other divisions. The Interdisciplinary Studies Committee will be convened and supported by the Office of the Provost.

Admission Requirements for the B.I.S. Program

Candidates for the B.I.S. degree must complete an application for admission to the program. The Interdisciplinary Studies Committee approves applications.

Approved programs of study are well-designed, coherent, structured to meet the student’s unique educational goals, and not readily available under any other UMSL degree program.

Students must have demonstrated the equivalent of academic proficiency required for any other undergraduate degree at UMSL.

Degree Requirements for the B.I.S. Program

General Education Requirements

Students must complete the university’s general education requirements. For details refer to the general education requirements section of this Bulletin.

Area of Study

In consultation with faculty and staff advisers, students will carry out an area of study of at least 36 advanced semester hours of graded credit that meets their educational goals. Graded credit consists of degree credit courses in which the student received a letter grade C- or better. The area of study must include at least nine hours at the 3000-level or above; these courses may be in one or more disciplines.

Hour and Grade Requirements

The degree requires completion of 120 semester hours with a 2.0 campus grade point average overall and in the area of study. No more than 15 hours may be taken in one department. At least 45 hours must be earned in courses beyond the introductory level. A minimum of 24 hours of graded credit must be completed in residence at UMSL, of which 15 hours must be in the area of study and completed after admission to the B.I.S. program. Each candidate must be in residence for 24 of the last 30 hours of graded credit (exclusive of courses taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis).

Supervised Professional or Service Internship and Independent Research

Credit not exceeding 6 hours may be earned for department-approved professional internship, service internship, or independent research. The projects or activities must be formulated by the student and carried out under the supervision of a faculty member with the approval of the adviser. Students must submit a written report approved by the supervisor upon completion of the projects or activities.

Interdisciplinary Certificates

Undergraduate Certificate in Child Advocacy Studies

The undergraduate Certificate Program in Child Advocacy Studies (CAST) is an interdisciplinary program requiring 19 credits of training in Child Advocacy Studies. The CAST certificate encompasses a group of courses focused on children, youth, and traumatic stress capped by a field experience. The CAST certificate is appropriate for students who want to specialize in working in a variety of professional settings with children and adolescents, many of whom may have experienced trauma. 

Most courses required by the Certificate Program in Child Advocacy Studies have prerequisites. Some students may satisfy prerequisites by virtue of their prior curriculum. When this is not the case, students are responsible for satisfying the prerequisites. All students must take at least one course outside their home department. All required courses must be taken in residence at UM-St. Louis.

Required courses
PSYCH/SOC WK/CAST 4398Child Maltreatment: A Multidisciplinary Approach3
CAST 4498Forensic Investigation of Child Abuse3
CAST 4598Child Abuse Assessment and Intervention3
Electives6
Please choose two of the following:
Human Relations Skills
Law, Politics and Society
Youth Gangs
Crime Prevention
Juvenile Justice And Delinquency
Violence Against Women
Victimology
Family and Professional Partnerships within School/Community
Child and Adolescent Development
Psychology of Learning, Instruction, and Assessment
Introduction To Gender Studies
Marriage And The Family
Sociology Of Victimization
Intimate Partner Violence
Drugs And Behavior
Psychology Of Trauma
Developmental Psychology: Infancy, Childhood And Adolescence
Traumatic Stress in Childhood and Adolescence 1
Clinical Problems Of Childhood
Developmental Psychology: Cognitive Development of Children
Deviance and Society
Sociology Of Wealth And Poverty
Sociology Of Education
Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families, and Groups
Abused And Neglected Children
Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders
Social Work in Mental Health
Field Experience Options 13
A field experience in a child-related field, approved and supervised by the student’s home department, is the final part of the certificate. All required CAST courses should be completed, though concurrent enrollment in one CAST course is permitted. Additionally, students must receive prior approval from the CAST program director.
Internship in Child Advocacy Studies
Internship In Criminology And Criminal Justice
Internship I
Internship In Gender Studies
Internship In Sociology
Supervised Field Experience In Social Work I
Seminar1
Field Education Seminar
Total Hours19
 
1

 Simultaneous enrollment in a CAST seminar is required for all disciplines. 


 

Undergraduate Certificate in Cybersecurity

The Undergraduate Certificate in Cybersecurity is a six-course (18 credit hours) interdisciplinary studies program. It is designed to help students from all backgrounds achieve a foundation in information security. It provides students the flexibility to focus on technical and/or managerial aspects of computer, software, network, and information security. With primary courses offered by Computer Science and Information Systems departments, the program also allows students to choose from a range of electives based on student interests. This certificate serves a broad group of managers, technical specialists, and professionals with or without a bachelor’s degree. A prior background in information security is not required to enter this program. A minimum GPA of 2.5 is required for admission.

Requirements

All students must take three required courses and three electives (at least one elective must be in Computer Science)

Required Courses
INFSYS 3848Introduction to Information Security3
CMP SCI 4730Computer Networks and Communications3
or INFSYS 3842 Data Networks and Security
CMP SCI 4782Information Security 3
or INFSYS 3858 Advanced Security and Information Systems
Electives
Choose three of the following (at least one must be a CMP SCI course):9
Introduction to Android Apps: Android Fundamentals
iOS Apps
Computer Forensics
Introduction to Cloud Computing
Computer and Network Security
Secure Software Development
Information Security Risk Management and Business Continuity
Total Hours18

Students may substitute the above courses with other courses upon approval by the program adviser in either the Computer Science or Information Systems department. In all cases, 18 hours are needed to complete the Undergraduate Certificate in Cybersecurity. A minimum of four courses must be taken in residence at UMSL. Students may not receive both the Undergraduate and the Graduate Certificate in Cybersecurity.

For more information, students can contact the program directors at cybersecurityUMSL@umsl.edu.

Evolutionary Studies Certificate 

The undergraduate certificate program in evolutionary studies is designed to provide a unifying perspective on the diverse subject areas of a liberal arts education. Evolutionary biology provides a link between the sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities. The core of the program is BIOL 1999, “Evolution for Everyone,” a course on evolution for students who are not majors in biology. (Biology majors who participate in the EvoS program must take BIOL 3302 instead.) In this course, students are introduced to the history of evolutionary thinking, the basic mechanisms of evolution, and the evolution of complex behaviors. In addition to this one required course, to obtain a certificate students must fulfill twenty credits from the list of courses designated below.

No more than eight hours can be taken at the freshman level, and at least eight hours must be taken at the junior-senior level (3000 level or above).

Courses taken for the certificate in the lower division can satisfy general education requirements (that is, breadth requirements). Courses in the upper division can satisfy requirements for the student’s major.

Courses in the Physical and Life Sciences
Physics and Astronomy
ASTRON 1011Planets And Life In The Universe3
Biology
BIOL 1202Environmental Biology3
BIOL 1821Introductory Biology: Organisms And The Environment5
BIOL 1999Evolution for Everyone (Required Core Course) 13
BIOL 2102General Ecology3
BIOL 2012Genetics3
BIOL 2402Vertebrate Anatomy, Evolution and Ecology3
BIOL 2501Biology Of Plants5
BIOL 3102Animal Behavior3
BIOL 3302Introduction To Evolution3
BIOL 4102Behavioral Ecology3
BIOL 4112Evolution Of Animal Sociality3
BIOL 4182Population Biology3
BIOL 4422Entomology3
BIOL 4442Developmental Biology3
BIOL 4501Flowering Plant Families: Phylogeny And Diversification5
Courses in the Social Sciences
Anthropology
ANTHRO 1005Introduction To Biological Anthropology4
ANTHRO 2105Human Variation3
Psychology
PSYCH 1003General Psychology3
PSYCH 2200Drugs And Behavior3
PSYCH 2205Human Sexuality: Psychological Perspectives3
PSYCH 2211Introduction To Biological Psychology3
PSYCH 3205Evolutionary Psychology3
PSYCH 3390Directed Studies1-6
PSYCH 3500Health Psychology3
PSYCH 4300Introduction To Psychopharmacology: Drugs And Mental Illness3
PSYCH 4311Psychology Of Nonverbal Behavior3
PSYCH 4330Hormones, The Brain And Behavior3
PSYCH 4349Human Learning And Memory3
PSYCH 4356Cognitive Processes3
PSYCH 3400Conceptual and Historical Foundations of Psychology3
PSYCH 4374Introduction To Clinical Neuropsychology3
Courses in the Humanities
English
ENGL 4030Contemporary Critical Theory3
ENGL 4080Narrative, Cognition, And Emotion3
Philosophy
PHIL 2280Minds, Brains, And Machines3
PHIL 2281Darwinism and the Philosophy of Biology3
Honors College Courses
See Honors College Courses below

1

Biology majors who participate in the EvoS program must take BIOL 3302 instead.

Honors College Courses

The Honors College will offer seminars as part of the Evolutionary Studies certificate or minor, and they will be identified as such before the opening of registration periods. EvoS seminars in honors will be open to non-Honors College students with at least a 3.0 GPA (students must obtain permission numbers from the Honors College). Please note that all honors college course numbers (e.g. ) relate to generic course titles (e.g. “Inquiries in the Humanities”), and so it is very important to register for the section number with the proper Evolutionary Studies seminar title. Where these honors college courses are cross-listed (e.g. with English xxxx or Philosophy yyyy), non-honors college students should take them under their departmental number.

History and Philosophy of Science and Technology Certificate

The undergraduate Certificate Program in History and Philosophy of Science and Technology (HPST) is an interdisciplinary program requiring a minimum of 18 credits in HPST.

All required courses must be completed with a "C-" or higher. The satisfactory/unsatisfactory option may not be used towards the HPST Certificate. A minimum of 12 hours must be taken at 2000 and above with 9 of those hours being at 3000 or above. Courses in the upper division (3000 level and above) may satisfy requirements for the student’s major, consistently with the major’s requirements.

Requirements

  1. History:
    Select two of the following courses in History and Technology:6
    History Of Economic Thought
    Religion, Philosophy & Science in History: Introduction to The Intellectual History Of The West
    Introduction To Transportation
    History Of Aviation In American Life
    Urbanization And Transportation
    Inquiries in World History 1
    Topics In History And Philosophy Of Science
    Conceptual and Historical Foundations of Psychology
    Total Hours6
  2. Philosophy:
    PHIL 3380Philosophy Of Science3
    Select one of the following in the philosophy of science:3
    Minds, Brains, And Machines
    Darwinism and the Philosophy of Biology
    Philosophy of Science in Historical Perspecitve
    Philosophy Of Science
    Feminism And Science
    Philosophy Of Cognitive Science
    Topics In Philosophy Of Science
    Philosophy Of Social Science
    Topics In History And Philosophy Of Science
    Conceptual and Historical Foundations of Psychology
    Total Hours6
  3. Science: Two courses in the mathematical, physical, life, behavioral, or social sciences. The science courses must be in addition to those satisfying the Gen Ed requirements (for students pursuing a degree at UM St. Louis) and conditional upon their acceptance by the HPST Certificate Undergraduate advisor (6 credit hours).
1

Note: HIST 4143 is offered under different topics; only the specific topic listed here counts as HPST.

Prerequisites

Some courses required by the Certificate Program in HPST have prerequisites. Some students may satisfy prerequisites by virtue of their prior curriculum. When this is not the case, students are responsible for either satisfying the prerequisites by adding courses to their curriculum or obtaining a waiver from the instructor.

Alternative courses to satisfy the History and Philosophy requirements:

Some courses may satisfy either the History or the Philosophy requirement even though they are not listed as such, depending on what their content is. These include but are not listed among those satisfying the requirements, you may do the following:

  • Obtain the description of what the course will cover.
  • Write a very short explanation of why the course ought to count toward satisfaction of the requirement, by showing how it deals with the relevant aspect of HPST.

Submit both to the HPST undergraduate advisor for approval.

Labor Studies Certificate

The Labor Studies Certificate is designed for students who are interested in a focused specialty in labor studies. The 18 credit hour curriculum consists of six credit courses offered over a three-semester period.

HIST 2219United States Labor History3
ECON 3450Labor in the Global Political Economy3
POL SCI 1450Introduction To Labor Studies3
POL SCI 3220Labor Law3
POL SCI 3430Union Leadership And Administration3
Total Hours15

Certificate in Neuroscience

The undergraduate Certificate Program in Neuroscience is an interdisciplinary program requiring 20 credits of training in Neuroscience. The Program provides a group of related courses capped by a research experience. The Program is likely to be of particular interest to students who want to pursue graduate or professional training, but it is intended to appeal to any student interested in Neuroscience.

Courses taken for the certificate in the lower division (1000 and 2000 level) may satisfy general education requirements (that is, breadth requirements), if they are approved general education courses. Courses in the upper division (3000 level and above) may satisfy requirements for the student’s major, consistently with the major’s requirements. All required courses must be completed with a “B-“average or higher. Pass/Fail grades to not count.

Most courses required by the Certificate Program in Neuroscience have prerequisites. Some students may satisfy prerequisites by virtue of their prior curriculum. When this is not the case, students are responsible for satisfying the prerequisites.

Requirements

The two entry level courses:
BIOL 1831Introductory Biology: From Molecules To Organisms 15
or BIOL 1012 General Biology
or BIOL 1102 Human Biology
PSYCH 2211Introduction To Biological Psychology3
Select one of the following statistics courses:3
Biometry
Applied Statistics I
Psychological Statistics
Social Statistics
Electives
Select two of the following: 26
Animal Behavior
Introduction To Neuroscience
Biochemistry
Introduction To Artificial Intelligence
Introduction to Machine Learning
Minds, Brains, And Machines
Philosophy of Mind
Topics In Philosophy Of Mind
Philosophy Of Cognitive Science
Biophysics Of Imaging
Introduction To Psychopharmacology: Drugs And Mental Illness
Behavioral Neuroscience
Hormones, The Brain And Behavior
Human Learning And Memory
Cognitive Processes
Introduction to Social Neuroscience
Select at least 3 credits from one or more semesters of research experience 33
Research
Chemical Research
Individual Studies
Special Readings In Philosophy
Research
Directed Studies
Total Hours20
1

BIOL 1831 is strongly recommended, especially for those considering taking BIOL 4822 Introduction to Neurosciences towards their Neuroscience Certificate (BIOL 1831 is a prerequisite for BIOL 4822)”

2

At least one elective must be taken outside the student’s major

3

This requires completion of a Directed Research Assistantship with a Neuroscience faculty member within any of the participating departments. The research project must be approved in advance by the undergraduate advisor with the assistance of a committee of Neuroscience faculty. It is expected that this research will lead to a presentation of the research (e.g., at the UM-St. Louis Neuroscience seminar or the Undergraduate Research Symposium).

Studies in Religions Certificate

A certificate in studies in religions requires the completion of 18 hours with a grade of C or better.

Courses must be chosen from two or more departments (interdisciplinary offerings excluded), and the program must include two or more courses that focus on different major religious traditions. (Courses that fulfill this requirement are marked with an asterisk [*] in the list below.)

In addition, students are encouraged to broaden their understanding of religions and religious experience by enrolling in several courses in which these subjects are studied in philosophical or cultural contexts.

Students must obtain the approval of the coordinator of studies in religions before completing 12 hours toward this certificate.

Requirements

Select 6 of the following list in accordance with the guidelines above:18
Anthropology
Art
ANTHRO 2173
Archaeology And Cultures Of The Biblical World
Medieval Art
English
Literature Of The Old Testament
Literature Of The New Testament
Special Topics In Literature 1
History
Selected Topics in History 2
Christianity: From Jesus to Martin Luther
Europe In Early Middle Ages: Paganism to Christianity
Religion, Philosophy & Science in History: Introduction to The Intellectual History Of The West
Philosophy
Asian Philosophy
Philosophy Of Religion
Medieval Philosophy
Political Science
Ancient And Medieval Political Thought
American Political Thought
Total Hours18
1

Note: ENGL 4950 should only be taken when Religious Literature is the topic.

2

 Topic in HIST 2000 must be a religious topic.

Trauma Studies Certificate

The trauma studies certificate is designed for students who are interested in a focused specialty in trauma studies or victim services in addition to their own major. It is appropriate for students in the College of Arts and Sciences or any of the schools of the university. It is particularly appropriate for students wishing to pursue careers in psychology, social work, sociology, criminology, law, public health, or nursing.

Requirements

A student may earn a trauma studies certificate by completing 18 hours with a GPA of 2.0 or better from at least three departments from the following courses:

Select at least three of the following:12
Criminology and Criminal Justice
Criminal Law
Communities And Crime
Victimology
Psychology
Psychology Of Trauma
Directed Studies (for three credits only toward certificate) 1
Social Work
Introduction To Strategies for Social Work Practice
Abused And Neglected Children
Child Welfare Practicum Seminar
Sociology
Sociology Of Victimization
Select up to two of the following:6
Criminology and Criminal Justice
Crime Prevention
Policing
Race, Crime, And Justice
Political Science
Public Administration
Introduction To Public Policy
Psychology
Social Psychology
Psychology Of Gender
Abnormal Psychology
Social Work
Gender Issues in Social Work
Sociology
Introduction To Gender Studies
Social Psychology
The Sociology Of Conflict
Race, Crime, And Justice
Total Hours18

1

Please seek approval of the Coordinator of the Trauma Studies Certificate in advance.

Special Topics courses relevant to trauma studies may be included in the certificate when approved in advance by the coordinator of the trauma studies certificate.

Interdisciplinary Minors

Minor in American Studies

American Studies involves an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the history, cultures, politics, and economy of the United States, its colonial antecedents, and its indigenous peoples.   At UMSL, the minor enables students also to study the city and region of St. Louis, a quintessentially American city.   

Students interested in this minor should contact the coordinator of American Studies for advice and information.   

There are 18 hours required in the minor, and in completing these hours candidates must take courses from at least three disciplines.  Candidates must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or better in the minor. Three hours of the minor may be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis, and a maximum of nine hours will be accepted in transfer.  Candidates wishing to take American Studies courses in the Honors College do not need to be members of the Honors College but must register for the courses via the Honors College.    

Requirements for the Minor.  

Completion of the American Studies Minor requires at least 18 credit hours (6 courses) including an interdisciplinary introductory course.   Of the remaining 15 hours, at least six hours must be taken from a small group of core courses designed to give students a foundation for further study and at least six hours from a larger group of elective courses which will broaden students’ experience or enable them to specialize in specific areas. At least six hours must be taken from advanced level (3000 and 4000) undergraduate courses.   Students are recommended to include in this advanced work an American Studies “capstone”, an option that may be fulfilled in several ways, which are described below.

Introductory Course
HIST 2160Introduction to American Studies (must be taken in first 12 hours of the minor)3
Core Courses
Choose at least one of the following:3
American Literature Before 1865
American Literature After 1865
Choose at least one of the following:3
American Civilization To 1865
American Civilization 1865 To Present
Introduction To American Politics
American Traditions: Social And Behavioral Sciences
Elective Courses
Choose at least two courses from the following American Studies electives6
Anthropology
Native American Literature
Native Peoples Of North America
Native American Spirituality
Shamans, Serpents, and Spirits: Archaeology of the Borderlands
Art History
Indigenous Arts Of North America
American Art To 1876
American Art Since 1876
American Architecture
Criminology
Introduction To Criminology And Criminal Justice
Criminal Law
Violence In America
Communities And Crime
Gender, Crime, And Justice
Race, Crime, And Justice
Economics
Monetary Policy in Historical Perspective
History Of American Economic Development
English
Selected Major American Writers I
Selected Major American Writers II
American Fiction To World War I
Modern American Fiction
History
The History Of Women In The United States
The Modernization Of The United States
History Of St. Louis
Topics In African-American History
Sex, Drugs, and Rock 'n Roll: The 1960s in Song, Fashion, Dating, and Protest
Gender Studies
History of Women and Social Movements
Politics of Gender in the United States
History Of Women In The United States
Diversity And Social Justice
Gender and Body Image in Media and Culture
Honors
Inquiries In The Humanities (topic must be approved by American Studies coordinator)
Inquiries In The Social And Behavioral Sciences (topic must be approved by American Studies coordinator)
Advanced Honors Seminar In The Humanities (topic must be approved by American Studies coordinator)
Advanced Honors Seminar In The Social And Behavioral Sciences (topic must be approved by American Studies coordinator)
Military and Veterans Studies
Veterans in America
Gender and the Military
Music History
History of Rock Music
Introduction To African-American Music
Introduction To Jazz
The American Musical Film
Popular Music in America
Musical Journey of the Native North American
American Music
Political Science
Law, Politics and Society
African Americans And The Political System
The Politics of Identity and Social Justice
The Politics of Gender in the United States
American Political Thought
Civil Liberties
The American Presidency
Public Opinion and Political Participation
The Politics Of Poverty And Welfare
Sociology
Social Problems
The City
Aging in America: Concepts & Controversies
Urban Sociology
Power, Ideology And Social Movements
Introduction to Feminist and Gender Theory
Sociology Of Wealth And Poverty

Student considering other elective choices must work with the American Studies faculty coordinator to obtain approval to apply these courses to the minor.

Capstone options:

Students are encouraged to complete a capstone for the American Studies minor.  A capstone course can satisfy three credit hours of the 18 hour minor.  Experiences that could serve as a capstone include appropriate departmental capstone courses, independent studies, research projects, and internships.  Interested students should work with the coordinator of American Studies to have a capstone course approved.
    

Minor in Child Advocacy Studies

The undergraduate minor in Child Advocacy Studies (CAST) is an interdisciplinary program requiring 15 credits of training in Child Advocacy Studies. The CAST minor encompasses a group of courses focused on children, youth, and traumatic stress. The CAST minor is appropriate for students who want to explore working in a variety of professional settings with children and adolescents, many of whom may have experienced trauma. 

Most courses required by the minor in Child Advocacy Studies have prerequisites. Some students may satisfy prerequisites by virtue of their prior curriculum. When this is not the case, students are responsible for satisfying the prerequisites. All required courses must be taken in residence at UM-St. Louis.

Required courses:
PSYCH/CAST 3290Traumatic Stress in Childhood and Adolescence 13
PSYCH/SOC WK/CAST 4398Child Maltreatment: A Multidisciplinary Approach 13
CAST 4498Forensic Investigation of Child Abuse3
or CAST 4598 Child Abuse Assessment and Intervention
Electives6
Please choose two of the following:
Forensic Investigation of Child Abuse (if course not used above)
Child Abuse Assessment and Intervention (if course not used above)
Law, Politics and Society
Youth Gangs
Crime Prevention
Juvenile Justice And Delinquency
Violence Against Women
Victimology
Human Relations Skills
Psychology of Learning, Instruction, and Assessment
Child/Family and Education and Community Involvement
Introduction To Gender Studies
Marriage And The Family
Sociology Of Victimization
Domestic Violence: Theory, Problems, And Practice
Drugs And Behavior
Psychology Of Trauma
Developmental Psychology: Infancy, Childhood And Adolescence
Clinical Problems Of Childhood
Developmental Psychology: Cognitive Development of Children
Deviance and Society
Sociology Of Wealth And Poverty
Sociology Of Education
Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families, and Groups
Abused And Neglected Children
Addictions: Assessment And Intervention In Social Work Practice
Social Work in Mental Health
Total Hours15

1     Course pending faculty senate approval

Minor in Classical Studies

The minor in Classical Studies is an interdisciplinary course of studies intended to encourage undergraduates in various disciplines to come to a fuller awareness of the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome and of the classical tradition that underlies much of modern Western civilization. In addition to appealing to any student’s curiosity about the early stages of society in the West, the minor provides an especially valuable supplement to those who are majoring in many liberal arts areas including history, literature, philosophy, foreign languages, and art.

Students pursuing the minor will acquire a foundation in either Greek or Latin. They may choose to use either sequence to fulfill the foreign language requirement in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Requirements

Candidates for the minor must complete 19 credit hours of course work including:

LATIN 1001
  & LATIN 1002
Latin I
   and Latin II
10
or GRK ANC 1001
  & GRK ANC 1002
Ancient Greek I
   and Ancient Greek II
Select three of the following:9
Art And Archaeology Of The Ancient World
Greek Art And Archaeology
Roman Art & Archaeology
Topics In Ancient Art And Archaeology
GRK ANC 2101Intermediate Ancient Greek Language And Culture3
Rome: The Republic And Empire
Intermediate Latin Language And Culture
Ancient Philosophy
Plato
Aristotle
Any other course approved by the coordinator
Total Hours22

Minor in Environmental Studies

This is an interdisciplinary program that integrates the natural and physical sciences with the social sciences and humanities to study current environmental problems resulting from human population growth, global climate change, overuse of natural resources, pollution and biodiversity loss. A minimum 18 hours are required, 9 of which must be in the natural and physical sciences, including the listed Honors College courses, and 9 must be from the social sciences and humanities. Both BIOL 1202 (Environmental Biology) and POL SCI 3480 Environmental Politics must be completed as part of the total 18 hours. A total of 12 hours must be taken at or above the 2000 level, with one additional course at or above the 3000 level besides POL SCI 3480. At least 9 hours must be taken while in residence at UMSL. A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required.

ANTHRO 1005Introduction To Biological Anthropology4
ANTHRO 2126Archaeology Of Greater St Louis3
ANTHRO 3228People and Plants3
ANTHRO 3232Environmental Archaeology3
ANTHRO 3270Human Ecology, Cultural Collapse, and Sustainable Developments3
BIOL 1202Environmental Biology3
BIOL 1821Introductory Biology: Organisms And The Environment5
BIOL 2102General Ecology3
BIOL 2103General Ecology Laboratory2
BIOL 2501Biology Of Plants5
BIOL 3202Conservation Biology3
BIOL 3203Conservation Biology Laboratory2
BIOL 3302Introduction To Evolution3
BIOL 4102Behavioral Ecology3
BIOL 4192Applications of Geographic Information Systems5
BIOL 4222Tropical Ecology And Conservation3
BIOL 4245Field Biology3
BIOL 4270Global Climate Change3
BIOL 4402Ornithology3
BIOL 4403Ornithology Laboratory2
BIOL 4422Entomology3
BIOL 4423Entomology Laboratory2
BIOL 4501Flowering Plant Families: Phylogeny And Diversification5
ECON 3500The Economics of Government Spending and Taxation3
ECON 4160Geospatial Analysis In The Social Sciences3
ECON 4170Fundamentals Of Cost-Benefit Analysis3
ECON 4550Natural Resource Economics3
GEOL 1002Historical Geology4
HONORS 2050Inquiries In The Natural Sciences1-3
HONORS 2051Inquiries in the Sciences: Laboratory or Field Work1
INTL BUS 4281Entrepreneurship in the Global Environment3
PHIL 2255Environmental Ethics3
POL SCI 3480Environmental Policy3
POL SCI 3595Studies In Comparative Politics3
POL SCI 3850International Organizations And Global Problem-Solving3
POL SCI 3900Special Readings1-10

Minor in Latina/Latino Studies 

Latina/Latino Studies at the University of Missouri-St. Louis is an interdisciplinary program dedicated to the study of the historical, social, political, language, and cultural experiences of U.S. Latina/Latinos, their families and communities. Students in this program will examine how transnational understandings of race, ethnicity, politics, culture, and language are mapped onto and struggled over within the United States, the Midwest, and St. Louis.

In addition to two required courses—Introduction to Latina/Latino Studies and an internship/service learning Capstone Experience—students will select three electives to round out the minor, each from a different discipline, on topics such as immigration, bilingualism, cultural worldview, comparative politics, and history (more classes will be added as created). Students will combine courses across the disciplinary spectrum into an individualized program to gain a deeper understanding of Latina/Latino cultures, histories, and social conditions; while they engage in collaborative projects, civic programs, and service learning; and enhance writing and analytical skills.

Introductory Course
HIST 2002Introduction to Latina/Latino Studies3
Electives9
Choose 3 from following list; at most one course from each discipline will count toward the minor/certificate
Shamans, Serpents, and Spirits: Archaeology of the Borderlands
Race, Crime, And Justice
General Linguistics in Tchg English to Speakers of Other Languages
Basic Principles of Second and Foreign Language Acquisition
Sociolinguistics and Communication in the Classroom
Languages and World View
Mexican American History
U.S. Social Movements In The 20Th Century
Present Moral Problems
Introduction To Comparative Politics
Political Systems Of South America
Political Systems Of Mexico, Central America And The Caribbean
Introduction to Spanish Translation and Interpreting
SPANISH 2101 or above (SPANISH 1199 can substitute)
Capstone
A service learning/internship capstone experience course in the Latina/Latino community approved by the program director.3
Total Hours15

Minor in Legal Studies

The minor in Legal Studies is open to all undergraduate students at UMSL, whatever their major field. It offers a secondary field of concentration in one of the most important areas of social life. Students may use the minor as a complement to their major, as an additional qualification for career opportunities, or as general education.

This interdisciplinary minor coordinates liberal arts courses related to law. A faculty member in Legal Studies will advise students and will work with their major advisers in planning appropriate courses.

Candidates must take:

POL SCI/CRIMIN 1200Foundations Of Law: An Introduction To Legal Studies3
Select five of the following: 115
Introduction to Personal Law
Legal Environment Of Business
Business Law: Contracts, Sales, Secured Transactions, Bankruptcy
Business Law:Negotiable Instruments, Business Organ., Property
The Law Of International Business Transactions
Introduction To Criminology And Criminal Justice
Criminal Law
Criminal Justice Policy
Courts
Rights Of The Offender
Communities And Crime
Law And Economics
Topics In American Constitutional History
Medieval England: From Arthur to Richard III
Media Law And Regulation
Topics In Philosophy Of Law
Law, Politics and Society
Judicial Politics And Policy
Gender And The Law
Constitutional Law
Civil Liberties
The Supreme Court
International Law
Total Hours18

1

At least three courses must be taken at the 3000 level and above. No more than two courses from a single discipline may be included in the minor.

Minor in Public Affairs Journalism

Requirements

  1. Nine hours in communication/English professional training:
    ENGL 3140News Writing3
    or MEDIA ST 3214 News Writing
    ENGL 3180Reporting3
    or MEDIA ST 2212 Broadcast Writing And Reporting
    Select one of the following:
    Writing Internship
    Internship In Journalism
    Internship In Radio
    Internship In Television/Film
    Total Hours6
  2. Nine hours in public affairs at the 3000 level or above
    1. a. Students earning a writing certificate or majoring in communication with a mass communication emphasis must take 15 hours (at least 9 of these at the 3000 level or above) in economics, political science, or sociology.
    2. b. Students majoring in economics, political science, or sociology must take nine hours (in addition to the required English/communication courses) at the 3000 level or above in addition to English/communication courses chosen from those listed above and/or in the two cognate areas outside their major (i.e., economics, political science, or sociology).

A list of courses applicable to the minor is available from the coordinator.

Minor in Urban Studies

A minor in urban studies includes 18 hours of course work. Candidates must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or better in the minor. Courses taken on a satisfactory/ unsatisfactory basis may not be applied to the minor. Special topics courses relevant to urban studies may be included in the minor when approved in advance by the coordinator of the urban studies minor.

Requirements

Students must take:

Select six of the following 118
American Architecture
The Artist And The City
Crime Prevention
Communities And Crime
Urban Areas and Real Estate Markets
Selected Topics In History
Introduction To Urban Politics
Urban Administration
Environmental Psychology
Social Problems
Urban Sociology
Problems Of Urban Community
Total Hours18

1

 At least three courses at the 3000 level or above. No more than two courses from a single discipline may be incuded in the minor.

Courses

INTDSC 1003 University Studies: 1 semester hour

This course, required of all new freshmen in the College of Arts and Science and the College of Fine Arts and Communication, is designed to assist students in making the transition to the university experience and to UMSL by giving students the knowledge and tools needed to succeed as a scholar. The course will also familiarize students with the relationship between their education and their career and personal goals, and will assist in developing positive connections with faculty, staff, and peers at UMSL. Students will learn about faculty expectations, support services, and student life, as well as academic disciplines. The course counts toward the 120 credit hours needed for graduation.

INTDSC 1004 SUCCEED Special Topics: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: By consent of SUCCEED director. This course is designed to assist students in the SUCCEED program make the transition to the university experience and to UMSL. This course gives students in SUCCEED the opportunity to be co-enrolled in courses that meet their interests and abilities through a mutual agreement between SUCCEED staff and UMSL course instructors regarding enrollment and student expectations.

INTDSC 1010 Information Research & Student Success: 1 semester hour

Students will use online library resources to learn search techniques for different types of information. Course content will be delivered through interactive, online tutorials and short, informative videos. Students will develop an understanding of academic research that will set a foundation for critical thinking skills. The course will help students in practical ways, such as for researching term papers, but also in more abstract ways, such as exposing them to the world of scholarship and academic knowledge.

INTDSC 1030 Language and Communicative Arts Across the Disciplines: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: None. This course is designed to advance the academic skills of university-level students. This course consists of listening to academic lectures across the disciplines; reading texts and articles to supplement lectures; writing summaries, essays and responses to exam questions; understanding and editing grammar and sentence structure; phonetics and word stress patterns; presentation skills; and advancing skills in note-taking, critical thinking, and comprehension of advanced college-level vocabulary of various fields of study.

INTDSC 1220 Special Topics in Gerontology: 3 semester hours

Same as GERON 2220. Selected topics dealing with various aspects of gerontology. The specific content of this course will vary from semester to semester. The course may be repeated with permission from the Gerontology Director.

INTDSC 1700 Major and Career Exploration: 1 semester hour

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn & explore various majors and career paths within a structured setting. Both informative and interactive, the course will provide students with the opportunity to learn broadly about college majors and their relationship to the 'world of work,' while also researching specifically the options they are interested in pursuing. The course seeks to assist students with answering two questions, "What do I want to study?" and "How do I want to make a life for myself (and family)?" Components of the course will also educate students about the current and projected employment market, and how to further research pertinent career information.

INTDSC 1999 Big History: From the Big Bang to the Present: 3 semester hours

Same as HIST 1999. An introduction to the humanities, social science, and science disciplines through a sweeping overview of natural and human history from the Big Bang to the present. Course will include lectures from faculty in various Arts and Sciences units, films, and group discussions.

INTDSC 1999A Big History: From the Big Bang to the Present: 6 semester hours

Same As HIST 1999A. An introduction to the humanities, social science, and science disciplines through a sweeping overview of natural and human history from the Big Bang ot the present. Course will include lectures from faculty in various Arts and Sciences units, films, field trips, and group discussions.

INTDSC 2003 Careers in Health and Medicine: 1 semester hour

Same as ANTHRO 2003, GERON 2003, SOC 2003. In this course, students will learn about occupations in such fields as medicine, the allied health professions, health non-profit organizations, and global healthcare delivery. Students will understand the education and skills necessary for various careers and for application to medical, professional, and graduate schools, and will become familiar with majors, certificates and minors that are available at UMSL. They will learn about employment opportunities in the healthcare industry in the St. Louis metropolitan area, and will be introduced to members of the local community who give guest lectures. Students will gain practical experience by shadowing a healthcare professional in their job.

INTDSC 3010 Peer Mentoring: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Instructor's consent required. The objective of this interdisciplinary course is to prepare and support undergraduate students working across campus as learning assistants, tutors, peer mentors, student leaders, etc. The course will support the development of general pedagogical knowledge of active learning, leadership and facilitation skills, and effective communication and listening skills, that they will use to facilitate learning in settings where students are working collaboratively, reviewing course content, or receiving supplemental instruction to guide their success. This course may be repeated for up to 6 credit hours.