Campus Address: 110 Clark Hall and 221 Clark Hall (Veteran's Center)
Web Site: http://www.umsl.edu/~mvs/
Main Number: 314-516-6037 and 314-516-5705 (Veteran's Center)

General Information

Veterans Studies is a multi-disciplinary field of study devoted to developing a clearer understanding of veterans and the veteran experience.  Veterans Studies will provide students a foundational understanding of military structure, culture, combat, and the personal changes resulting from military service.  It will challenge students to think more clearly about how veterans fit into society and what obligations, if any, a society holds towards its veteran community. The program provides students the knowledge necessary to better serve veterans and the veteran community, as well as better relate to veterans in our society.

The mission of the Department of Military and Veterans Studies is to enable success for current and future veterans on campus, and to create a researched-based curriculum for students who are interested in studying the veteran experience.

Academic programs:

Military and Veterans Studies provides academic programs leading to one of two undergraduate minors, or a bachelor’s degree (through the interdisciplinary studies program).  Coursework is multi-disciplinary and it is designed for students of any background or any major. Military and Veterans Studies students will graduate with a nuanced understanding of the military and veteran experience, the role veterans play in our society, and the obligations our society might hold towards this subset of our population.  

Student Services: 

The Department of Military and Veterans Studies enables success for current and future veterans primarily though its sponsorship of the UMSL Veterans Center.  The Veterans Center exists to assist veterans in their transition from military to campus life.  It is a one-stop resource center, staffed by student veterans and veteran volunteers, committed to facilitating and coordinating the overall integration of veterans into the UMSL academic community.  The UMSL Veterans Center is UMSL Veterans serving UMSL Veterans!

General Education Requirements

MVS 2100: Veterans in America satisfies a "Social Sciences" general education requirement.

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Acquire a working knowledge of the history of veterans in American society
  • Understand how the professional nature of the modern military might affect a person who has left service
  • Analyze the psychological effects of military service in a time of war and the process of recovery from such distress
  • Acquire the ability to evaluate veteran issues in a multi-disciplinary manner to identify and address the “hard questions” about our society’s relationship with its veteran community
  • Inspire you to continue your research into veterans studies as an emphasis area in your major field of study 

Minor in Veterans Studies

The Minor in Veterans Studies is a multi-disciplinary program whose course work focuses and enhances students’ majors to prepare them to work for or with veterans. It is also designed to encourage and enable veteran students to reflect more deeply on their service experiences. This minor includes a foundation course, an introductory course in the psychology of trauma, elective courses, and a capstone.  Electives may be chosen from four areas:

Cultural: exploring perspectives and experiences of veterans through various media

Relational: understanding how veterans relate among various aspects of our society

Institutional: understanding the context and structure of military service and veteran institutions now and in the past

Clinical: establishing effective skills to better serve for, with, and in veteran populations

Alternative elective courses (including other MVS courses) could be included with the consent of the department chair. While it is encouraged, students are not required to limit their electives to a single area.

MVS 2100Veterans in America3
PSYCH 2232Psychology Of Trauma3
Electives9
Cultural
Introduction To Cultural Anthropology
World Cultures
Sex And Gender Across Cultures
Cultures Of The Near And Middle East
Modern American Fiction
Present Moral Problems
Islamic Philosophy
Social And Political Philosophy
Institutional
The Vietnam War
US Foreign Relations and Military History To 1900
US Foreign Relations and Military History Since 1900
World Politics
Studies In War And Peace
International Law
Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice
Communities And Crime
Relational
Intercultural Communication
Communication & Conflict
Communication Barriers I
Psychology Of Death And Dying
Cross-Cultural Psychology
Introduction To Psychopharmacology: Drugs And Mental Illness
Introduction To Gender Studies
Masculinities
Clincal
Social Work And Social Issues
Social Welfare As A Social Institution
Communication In The Nursing Profession
Bioethics
Psychology Of Death And Dying
Introduction to Gerontological Practice
Capstone
MVS 4100Veterans Studies Capstone Seminar 3
Total Hours18

Minor in Military History and Logistics

This interdisciplinary minor educates students in the art and science of military operations and processes through rigorous academic grounding in military history, business logistics, and organizational leadership theory. It is ideally suited for students pursuing professional careers in intelligence, the armed forces, and other military-related fields. It is also intended as a supplemental course of study for students enrolled in the Reserve Officer Training Corps program.

Students must receive a grade of "C" or higher in required courses.

Program Requirements

Core

All students must take 9-credits of core courses consisting of:

MIL SCI 1101Introduction to Leadership I3
MIL SCI 1102Introduction To Leadership II3
PHIL 1130Approaches To Ethics3

After completing the program’s core requirements, students may choose to pursue either a
Military History track or a Military Logistics and Operations track for an additional 9-credits.

Military History Track

Students may choose from the following courses:

HIST 2004United States History: The Civil War Era, 1860-19003
HIST 2018The Vietnam War3
HIST 2023US Foreign Relations and Military History To 19003
HIST 2024US Foreign Relations and Military History Since 19003
HIST 2025Topics in Military History3

Military Logistics and Operations Track

Students may choose from the following courses:

LOG OM 3300Business Statistics3
LOG OM 3320Introduction To Operations Management3
LOG OM 4330Business Logistics Systems3
LOG OM 4350Management Science Methods3
MGMT 3600Management And Organizational Behavior3
MGMT 3625Leadership in Organization3
PSYCH 3318Industrial And Organizational Psychology3


 

FAQ's

What is Veterans Studies?   

Veterans Studies is a multi-disciplinary field of study devoted to developing a clearer understanding of veterans and the veteran experience.  Veteran Studies will provide students a foundational understanding of military structure, culture, combat, and the personal changes resulting from military service.  It will challenge students to think more clearly about how veterans fit into society, and what obligations, if any, a society holds towards its veteran community. The program provides students the knowledge necessary to better serve veterans and the veteran community, as well as better relate to veterans in our society.

What will I learn?   

Veteran Studies will provide students a foundational understanding of military structure, culture, combat, and the personal changes resulting from military service.  It will challenge students to think more clearly about how veterans fit into society and what obligations, if any, a society holds toward its veteran community.

Do I need to be a veteran to take Veterans Studies classes? 

No.  In fact our goal is to provide non-veterans the academic depth to understand and serve in the veteran community. 

If I am a veteran, should I take Veterans Studies classes? 

Absolutely.  Veterans are encouraged to join Veterans Studies for the same reasons as other students.  But also so they can explore new ways to reflect on their own service and experiences

Why should I take a Military and Veterans Studies Course? 

If you want to better understand the veteran experience as an emphasis in your major or just because of your curiosity, then Military and Veterans Studies is a fit for you.  Veterans Studies courses develop insights and multidisciplinary perspectives that enhance your major.  Typical majors include:  Psychology, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Social Work, Sociology, Anthropology, Nursing, History, Political Science, Business and English.  This list is not exhaustive. 

Web Site: http://www.umsl.edu/~umslrotc
Main Number: 314-935-5521

Background

The Military Science Program in the Department of Military and Veterans Studies is the academic home to Army Reserve Officers Training Corps (Army ROTC).  UMSL is partner institution in the Gateway Army ROTC Battalion – which is hosted at Washington University in St. Louis.  Completion of the Army ROTC program of instruction qualifies the student for a commission in the United States Army, Army National Guard, or United States Army Reserve. The curriculum does not provide technical training in a job specialty, nor does it emphasize vocational training; rather, it complements and provides a base for normal progression in the commissioned officers' educational program.

Leadership and management objectives are included in academic periods of instruction. Practical leadership experience is gained in a field training environment by attendance at a thirty-two-day summer camp, normally between the junior and senior years. Nursing students attend a nursing internship at Army hospitals following the normal summer camp. A leadership laboratory also provides experience in a range of leadership positions during the school year. The program offers both a four-year and a two-year program, each with its own special advantages. Students are invited contact the Military Science Program to obtain additional information.

The program requires four years of military science courses, which consist of a two-year basic course and a two-year advanced course. Students can begin the four-year program as a freshman or as a sophomore.

There is also a two-year ROTC program for those students with only two years of college remaining. The two-year course is designed for junior college and other non-ROTC college transfer students, but may be utilized by students who did not enroll in the basic course outlined below. Graduate students may also qualify for enrollment in the two-year course. Additional information regarding eligibility requirements for the two-year program may be obtained by contacting the Department of Military Science.

Basic Course

The basic course is normally taken as an elective subject by students in their freshman and sophomore years. The purpose of this instruction is to qualify students for entry into the advanced course by familiarizing them with the organization of the Army, military skills, basic leadership and time management, and military tradition. Students do not incur any military obligation as a result of enrolling in the basic course. 

Advanced Course

Instruction in the advanced course includes leadership and management, the exercise of command, military teaching methods, tactics, logistics, administration, history, and military justice. Leadership experience and command experience are provided by assigning advanced course students as cadet leaders. Participation in regularly scheduled physical training is a required part of the leadership training. Classroom instruction consists of two one and a quarter hour (seventy-five minutes) periods and a one and a half hour (ninety minutes) leadership laboratory period each week. Only students who have demonstrated a definite potential for becoming competent officers will be selected for the advanced course. Students entering this course must be selected in accordance with the prerequisites listed below. 

  • Pass a military physical examination
  • Pass a background screening
  • Pass the three-event physical fitness test
  • Pass healthy body-fat standards           

Monetary Allowances

Cadets selected for admission into the advanced course qualify for a nontaxable monetary allowance of $400–$500 per month for up to twenty months. Cadets may also qualify for the simultaneous membership program with the United States Army Reserve or National Guard, which can provide over $16,000 during the last two years of school. Both the United States Army Reserve and the National Guard offer additional monetary incentives for cadets who join their organizations. 

Army ROTC College Scholarship Program

Financial assistance is available in the form of two-, three-, or four-year ROTC academic scholarships for selected students. Under the Army ROTC Scholarship Program, the students/cadets receive reimbursement for their tuition and fees. Additionally, Army scholarship recipients receive a flat-rate allowance of $1200 per year for textbooks and other expenses and a $300–$500 per month stipend for up to 10 months per year. During the thirty-two-day advanced course summer training between the junior and senior years, Army ROTC also pays attending cadets $29.82 per day plus room and board. There are also numerous national and organizational scholarships that students may compete for as members of Army ROTC.

Textbooks and Uniforms

All textbooks, uniforms, items of insignia, and equipment incident to membership in the Army ROTC Program are furnished by the Gateway Battalion.

Leadership Laboratory

Leadership laboratory is open to students who are members of the Reserve Officer Training Corps or who are eligible to pursue a commission as determined by the professor of military science. Leadership laboratory is the formalized phase of leadership training conducted by the cadets. It is scheduled for one and one half hours (ninety minutes) each week for both the basic and advanced officer courses (non-contracted and contracted). All uniforms and equipment required for cadet activities are furnished.

FAQs

What is Army ROTC?  

ROTC is the Reserve Officers Training Corps. It is the largest officer commissioning program for the U.S. Army. It is structured as a college class in which one learns valuable leadership skills.

Do ROTC courses count for credit?

Yes!  All MILSCI courses at UMSL count as elective credit (towards your 120 requirement) and your grades are included in GPA calculations.  In addition, MIL SCI 1102 and MIL SCI 1102 are core courses for the Military History / Military Logistics Minor.

Am I joining the Army by signing up for ROTC?

NO, you are not joining the Army. Only if you are commissioned as a Second Lieutenant will you join the Army. If you are not receiving scholarship or stipend support, there is no military obligation whatsoever during the first two years of ROTC.

Can I just take the ROTC class for the leadership education or for my minor? 

YES.  You can take any 1000 or 2000 level class without prerequisite.  You can choose (or not choose) to participate in the extracurricular events like physical training, field training and other military skills. Before signing up for a 2000 level class, you should have a discussion with the UMSL ROTC advisor.

How about Scholarships?  Do you have any available? 

The Army offers full tuition 2, 3, and 4 year scholarships for the best students (you must be medically, physically, academically qualified and pass a background check).  These scholarships are merit and potential based.  The number and type of scholarships available is different every year, but once awarded a scholarship is a financial commitment from the Army to you through your graduation.

Web Site: http://parks.slu.edu/current-students/student-organizations/afrotc-207
Main Number: 314-977-8227

Background

The Aerospace Studies program in the Department of Military and Veterans Studies is the academic home to Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps (Air Force ROTC).  UMSL is partner institution in Detachment 207, Air Force ROTC – which is hosted at St. Louis University.  This program provides pre-commissioning education for qualified students who desire to serve on active duty as commissioned officers in the United States Air Force.

The aerospace studies curriculum is divided into two phases: (1) the general military course; and (2) the professional officer course. The department offers a standard and condensed four-year commissioning programs. The four-year program provides coursework during the freshman through senior years. The condensed program compresses the general military course to one academic year beginning in the fall. To obtain specific information, please contact the Aerospace Studies Program directly.

General Military Course

This program of instruction is open to any student and consists of the first- and second-year courses for students in the four-year Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) program. These courses deal with the Air Force structure and the development of air power. They strengthen interest in becoming a professional Air Force officer, develop knowledge of world military forces, and enable the student to understand how the United States Air Force supports national objectives and policies. 

Professional Officer Course

Aerospace studies courses offered during the third and fourth years must be completed by all students who seek a commission through AFROTC. Coursework continuity is designed to prepare college students to serve as active duty Air Force officers upon graduation and commissioning. The curriculum stresses national security in contemporary American society, leadership, management, and professionalism. Special emphasis is placed on developing the cadet's communication skills. Students entering this course must be selected in accordance with the prerequisites listed below. Students not currently enrolled in the AFROTC program must have permission of the department chairperson prior to enrolling in these courses. 

  • Pass a military physical examination
  • Pass the four-event physical fitness test
  • Pass height/weight standards
  • Have a 2.5 cumulative GPA or higher for undergraduates or a 3.0 cumulative GPA or higher for graduate students.

Note: Call the Aerospace Studies Program at 314-977-8227 for specific requirements. 

Leadership Laboratory

Leadership laboratory is the formalized phase of leadership training conducted by the cadets. It is scheduled for up to two hours each week. All uniforms and equipment required for cadet activities are furnished.  It is required for members of the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps, or students who are eligible to pursue a commission as determined by the chairman of the Department of Aerospace Studies. 

Monetary Allowances

Once the admission criteria have been met, the student may compete for the opportunity to contract for four years of active duty as a commissioned officer upon graduation. Upon selection and acceptance, the student receives a monthly, tax-exempt stipend ranging from $300.00–$500.00. Tuition assistance is possible but not guaranteed. It is awarded on a competitive basis.

Field Training

Cadets are required to attend a four-week field training course at Maxwell Air Force Base in Montgomery, AL before they may formally enroll in the professional officer course. Field training provides a better understanding of the United States Air Force mission, increases the cadets' proficiency in junior officer training areas, and stresses the importance of physical conditioning.  Students attending these courses receive pay for the encampment plus travel allowances.

FAQ

How do I join AFROTC if I am already in college? 

Once you are enrolled as a full time student, you can register for AERO 1001 if you are a freshman. If you are a sophomore or only have 3 years left of your degree, you may still join but will need to contact the Unit Admissions Officers first.

Do AFROTC courses count for credit?

Yes!  All AERO courses at UMSL count as elective credit (towards your 120 requirement) and your grades are included in GPA calculations. 

What is the difference between AFROTC and enlisting in the Air Force? 

AFROTC is one of three commissioning sources for the USAF. Upon completion of a bachelor’s degree and AFROTC you will be commissioned as an officer, followed by specific training in a career field. Officers are trained to be the leaders and supervisors of enlisted personnel. Rank, pay, and career opportunities for officers are commensurate with their elevated level of responsibility. Enlisting in the Air Force is done through a local recruiter followed by basic training and prospective technical training. This avenue does not require a college degree.

Will the Air Force pay for my school? 

AFROTC offers many scholarship opportunities. Prospective AFROTC cadets can apply for a high school scholarship before entering into college. Once in college, AFROTC cadets can apply for an in-college scholarship. This process is handled by the host detachment.

Air Science Courses

AERO 1001 The Air Force Today: 2 semester hours

Introduction to contemporary military issues and overall Air Force structure. Professionalism, human rights, and civilian-military relationships are stressed. Leadership laboratory activities designed to develop leadership potential, and includes military customs and courtesies, drill and ceremonies and base visitations.

AERO 1002 The Air Force Today: 2 semester hours

Continuation of AERO 1001. Includes strategic offensive and defense forces, general purpose forces, aerospace support forces, and relationships with U.S. Army forces. Individual communicative skills emphasized.

AERO 1500 Leadership Laboratory: 0 semester hours

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in an AERO course. Instruction is conducted within the framework of an organized cadet corps with a progression of experiences designed to develop each student's leadership potential. Course work includes a study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and ceremonies, career opportunities in the Air Force, and the life and work of an Air Force junior officer. Students develop their leadership potential in a practical, supervised laboratory, which typically includes field trips to Air Force installations throughout the United States. This course is generally taught at St. Louis University. It is required for all AF ROTC students.

AERO 2001 The Air Force Way: 2 semester hours

.

AERO 2002 The Air Force Way: 2 semester hours

.

AERO 3001 Air Force Management And Leadership: 3 semester hours

Integrated management course emphasizing the individual as a manager in air force milieu. Motivational and behavioral processes, leadership, communication, and group dynamics covered for development of the junior officer's professional skills as an Air Force officer. Basic managerial processes involving decision-making, utilization of analytic aids in planning, organizing and controlling in a changing environment are emphasized as professional concepts. Classroom activity, three hours per week; leadership laboratory, one hour per week.

AERO 3002 Air Force Management And Leadership: 3 semester hours

Continuation of AERO 3001; includes organizational and personal values, management of forces in change, organizational power, politics, and managerial strategy and tactics within context of the military organization. actual Air Force cases used to enhance learning and communication processes. Classroom activity, three hours per week; leadership laboratory, one hour per week.

AERO 4001 National Security Forces In Contemporary American Society: 3 semester hours

The armed forces as an integral element of society; American civil-military relations; environmental context in which U.S. defense policy is formulated and implemented; societal attitudes toward the military leader-manager in a democratic society; fundamental values and socialization processes associated with the armed services. Individual and group oral and written reports. Classroom activity, three hours per week; leadership laboratory, one hour per week.

AERO 4002 National Security Forces In Contemporary American Society: 3 semester hours

Continuation of AERO 4001. Requisites for maintaining adequate national security forces; political, economic and social constraints on the national defense structure; impact of technological and international developments on strategic preparedness; formulation and implementation of national security policy. Classroom activity, three hours per week; leadership laboratory, one hour per week.

Military Science Courses

MIL SCI 1101 Introduction to Leadership I: 3 semester hours

Examine the challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. You will learn how the personal development of life skills such as cultural understanding, goal setting, time management, mental/physical resiliency, and stress management relate to leadership, officership, and the Army profession. Enrollment in MIL SCI 1101 does not require a commitment to join the US Army, (FALL ONLY).

MIL SCI 1102 Introduction To Leadership II: 3 semester hours

Investigate leadership fundamentals such as problem-solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback, and using effective writing skills. You will explore dimensions of leadership attributes and core leader competencies in the context of practical, hands-on, and interactive exercises. Learn fundamental military concepts and explore the Army's leadership philosophy. Enrollment in MIL SCI 1102 does not require a commitment to join the US Army. (SPRING ONLY).

MIL SCI 1500 Leadership Laboratory: 0 semester hours

Prerequisites: Must be currently enrolled in a MIL SCI course. Leadership Laboratory provides basic and advanced leadership experience in military courtesy, drill and ceremonies and practical application of classroom-taught subjects. Functions and responsibilities of leadership positions are developed through student-led staff planning actions and command positions. This course normally meets at Washington University. Note: All military science scholarship and advanced course students must register for MIL SCI 1500.

MIL SCI 2201 Innovative Team Leadership: 3 semester hours

Explore the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and leadership theories. The focus continues to build on developing knowledge of leadership attributes and core leader competencies through the understanding of Army rank, structure, and duties as well as broadening knowledge of land navigation and squad tactics. Enrollment in MIL SCI 2201 does not require a commitment to join the US Army. (FALL ONLY).

MIL SCI 2202 Foundations of Tactical Leadership: 3 semester hours

Develop greater self-awareness as you assess your own leadership styles and practice communication and team building skills. Examine the challenges of leading teams in the complex operational environment. Study dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling, and operation orders. Explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations. Enrollment in MIL SCI 2202 does not require a commitment to join the US Army. (SPRING ONLY).

MIL SCI 3301 Adaptive Team Leadership: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Successful completion of MIL SCI 1101 through 2202; OR attendance at the Leader's Training Course (LTC); OR member of US Army Reserve or National Guard Unit. This is an academically challenging course where you will study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of Army leadership, officership, Army values and ethics, and small unit tactics. At the conclusion of this course you will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a team or squad in the execution of a tactical mission during a classroom practical exercise (PE), a leadership lab, or during a situational training exercise (STX) in a field environment. (FALL ONLY).

MIL SCI 3302 Applied Team Leadership: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: MIL SCI 3301. Continue to learn and apply the fundamentals of Army leadership, officership, Army values and ethics as you hone your leadership abilities in a variety of tactical environments and the classroom. Successful completion of this course will help prepare you for success at the ROTC Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) which you will attend the summer following this course at Fort Lewis, WA. You will receive systematic and specific feedback on your leadership attributes, values and core leader competencies from your instructors, other ROTC cadre, and senior cadets. (SPRING ONLY).

MIL SCI 4401 Adaptive Leadership: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the ROTC Leadership Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). This course focuses on practical application of adaptive leadership. Throughout the semester, students will attend weekly training meetings and fill the roles of Army staff officers. They will plan, execute and assess ROTC training and recruiting events. Study will also focus on the Army values, leader ethics and how they are applied in the Full Spectrum Operating Environment. The officer's role in the Uniform Code of Military Justice, counseling of subordinates, administrative actions and other aspects of everyday military life will also be discussed. (FALL ONLY).

MIL SCI 4402 Leaders In A Complex World: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: MIL SCI 4401. Explore the dynamics of leading in the complex situation of current military operations in the contemporary operating environment. Examine differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. You will also explore aspects of interacting with non-government organizations, civilians on the battlefield and host nation support. Significant emphasis is placed on preparing you for your branch school and first unit of assignment. (SPRING ONLY).

MIL SCI 4411 Advanced Military Science Studies I: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: MIL SCI 4401 or permission of instructor. An in-depth study of the role of the Army officer in today's Army.

MIL SCI 4412 Advanced Military Science Studies II: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: MIL SCI 4401 or permission of instructor. A study of how the Army officer develops the leadership traits necessary to lead soldier's into battle.

MIL SCI 4413 Military Medical Technologies Independent Study: 3 semester hours

This course explores how medical advances have improved soldiers' chances of surviving battlefield injuries from the Civil War to the Iraq War. Also explores how soldiers are now surviving more catastrophic injuries and what the implications are on long term health care for these soldiers both physically and mentally.

Military and Veterans Studies Courses

MVS 1100 Veterans Transition Seminar: 1 semester hour

This course is designed for the student veteran who is new to UMSL but not eligible for the First Year Experience class. It will survey essential life skills (time management, financial management, physical fitness) and tools for academic success (note-taking, writing, research, oral presentation). It will familiarize students with the relationship between their education and their career and personal goals. It will also expose students to campus and veteran-specific support services. Maybe most importantly, this course will provide a venue for veterans to connect with other veterans who are facing a similar transition.

MVS 2000 Selected Topics in Military or Veterans Studies: 1-3 semester hours

Selected topics in military or veterans studies. The topics will vary each semester. May be taken more than once for credit as long as the topic differs.

MVS 2100 Veterans in America: 3 semester hours

Prerequisite: ENGL 1100, ENGL 1110 or HONORS 1100. With a focus on the American veteran experience, this survey course will explore basic concepts, ideas and research into veterans and veteran institutions. In a multidisciplinary manner, we will examine military culture, the unique status of veterans in our society, and veteran institutions. We will study the successes, challenges and obligations our society faces related to its veteran community.

MVS 2130 Gender and the Military: 3 semester hours

Same As: GS 2130. This course investigates how the military treats gender difference, explores how military culture is defined, and how gender is a socially constructed concept. Topics include: What is military culture? What is gender? How do military culture and gender intersect? How does gender identity affect the military/soldiers? How prevalent are sexual assault and sexual harassment? How does this affect morale? How might it be eradicated? How do LGBTQ issues play out in military culture? How do disability and trauma shape the military experience? How does the military experience affect veterans' families? How are these issues being addressed globally?.

MVS 2200 Examining Cultural Experiences of Veterans: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor. This course is designed to explore the cultural experiences of veterans. Through discussion, reflection and writing, students will examine the service experience in another culture and then relate those limited interactions within the context of the culture as a whole. For non-western cultural experiences, this course meets UMSL Cultural Diversity [CD] requirement.

MVS 3100 Current Issues in Military and Veterans Studies: 1-4 semester hours

Selected topics in military or veterans affairs with emphasis on current issues and trends. May be repeated as long as the topic is different for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

MVS 3300 Veterans Public Policy and Advocacy: 3 semester hours

This course provides an overview of American public policy towards military veterans and then works to propose more effective veteran policies. The focus of the course will be on understanding the current issues facing veterans. Once that is accomplished we will design new solutions to the current problems. Finally, we will practice effecting change through various written products and presentations.

MVS 3500 Internship in Veterans Studies: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior Standing and consent of the department chair. Independent study involving regular on-site work with an appropriate public or private agency serving the veteran community. A written report reflecting on the experience is required. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

MVS 4100 Veterans Studies Capstone Seminar: 3 semester hours

Prerequisites: MVS 2100 and senior standing. Mentored by a faculty member, students in this course will apply insights gained from previous coursework into a substantial Veterans Studies project. Students will work with the instructor and the class to develop a topic, establish a research or project plan, then prepare a project or paper suitable for presentation to the public. Students should expect that their work will be published or presented at an end-of-the-year symposium. This is not an independent study.

MVS 4200 Independent Study in Military and Veterans Issues: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Faculty mentored, independent study through readings, reports, or field research. No student may take more than a cumulative total of 6 hours of Independent Study.

MVS 4300 Current Topics in Military or Veterans Studies: 1-3 semester hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing. Selected topics in military or veterans studies with emphasis on current issues and trends. May be repeated as long as the topic is different for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

MVS 6220 Social Policy and Military Veterans: 3 semester hours

Same as SOC WK 6220. Prerequisites: SOC WK 5200 or its equivalent or consent of the instructor and graduate standing. This course provides an overview of public policy towards military veterans, with an emphasis on social work. The course focuses on political theory and public policy and reviews the various methodological approaches to studying public policy, the pertinent theories related to public policy analysis, an introduction to military culture and current issues facing veterans. The main focus of the course will be on understanding the current issues facing veterans and how public policy affects these issues.

James Craig
Associate Teaching Professor and Department Chair
M.P.A., Harvard University

Rebecca McMenamin
Manager of Veteran and Military Services

Matt Snell (Lt Col, USA)
Adjunct Professor, Director of Military Science

Michael Cook (Lt Col, USAF)
Adjunct Professor, Director of Aerospace Studies

Lee Rodriquez (MasterSergeant, USA, retired)
Adjunct Assistant Professor in Military Science